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JLA, Vol. 18: Crisis of Conscience

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In the wake of Brad Meltzer's Identity Crisis , the JLA decides the time has come to tell Batman that they stole part of his memory. However, the League is attacked by the Secret Society of Super-Villains, out for vengeance now that their own memories are restored. As the JLA battles, Martian Manhunter confronts Despero, the alien conqueror, behind the villains memory-r In the wake of Brad Meltzer's Identity Crisis , the JLA decides the time has come to tell Batman that they stole part of his memory. However, the League is attacked by the Secret Society of Super-Villains, out for vengeance now that their own memories are restored. As the JLA battles, Martian Manhunter confronts Despero, the alien conqueror, behind the villains memory-restoration. By the time the dust settles, the League may have won the battle but lost the war. Collecting: JLA 115-119


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In the wake of Brad Meltzer's Identity Crisis , the JLA decides the time has come to tell Batman that they stole part of his memory. However, the League is attacked by the Secret Society of Super-Villains, out for vengeance now that their own memories are restored. As the JLA battles, Martian Manhunter confronts Despero, the alien conqueror, behind the villains memory-r In the wake of Brad Meltzer's Identity Crisis , the JLA decides the time has come to tell Batman that they stole part of his memory. However, the League is attacked by the Secret Society of Super-Villains, out for vengeance now that their own memories are restored. As the JLA battles, Martian Manhunter confronts Despero, the alien conqueror, behind the villains memory-restoration. By the time the dust settles, the League may have won the battle but lost the war. Collecting: JLA 115-119

30 review for JLA, Vol. 18: Crisis of Conscience

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    A Batman related read in celebration of his 80th birthday! What a fantastic end to a really cogent storyline - really liked the questions about privacy and surveillance that are asked here!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Spinning out of Identity Crisis, the Secret Society of Super-Villains have gotten they're memories back and they are pissed. Now they know who the relatives of all the JLA members are and they want revenge. The League must defeat the villains and decide if they are going to strip the villains' memories again in order to protect their families. Geoff Johns and Chris Batista knocked it out of the park with this one. Good art, fantastic story. Johns brought back some villains we haven't seen in a v Spinning out of Identity Crisis, the Secret Society of Super-Villains have gotten they're memories back and they are pissed. Now they know who the relatives of all the JLA members are and they want revenge. The League must defeat the villains and decide if they are going to strip the villains' memories again in order to protect their families. Geoff Johns and Chris Batista knocked it out of the park with this one. Good art, fantastic story. Johns brought back some villains we haven't seen in a very long time and made them dangerous again.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Well that was well-written but not much of a surprise. I think Johns has a good handle on the characters but it feels like he had to shoehorn this into the greater "event" plotline, so it doesn't come as much of a shock how this turned out. Or perhaps it's just a question of when this "set of momentous moments" will get forgotten in favour of some future event or whim. Maybe I'd feel more oomph if the villains had half a brain cell between them here and took one action that seemed coordinated wi Well that was well-written but not much of a surprise. I think Johns has a good handle on the characters but it feels like he had to shoehorn this into the greater "event" plotline, so it doesn't come as much of a shock how this turned out. Or perhaps it's just a question of when this "set of momentous moments" will get forgotten in favour of some future event or whim. Maybe I'd feel more oomph if the villains had half a brain cell between them here and took one action that seemed coordinated with any other villain. Decent art, a little cartoony but it services the action well enough.

  4. 4 out of 5

    C.J. Edmunds

    Following the events of the groundbreaking, IDENTITY CRISIS by thriller author, Brad Meltzer, this 18th volume of the Justice League of America, collects Issues 115-119. Take note, all this happens before the New -52, just in case you got suddenly confused and wondering. I felt IDENTITY CRISIS, blew the ball out of the park and so our heroes are left to deal with the memory tampering that they did with the villains but also with Batman. Crisis of ethics come into play with this collection and alo Following the events of the groundbreaking, IDENTITY CRISIS by thriller author, Brad Meltzer, this 18th volume of the Justice League of America, collects Issues 115-119. Take note, all this happens before the New -52, just in case you got suddenly confused and wondering. I felt IDENTITY CRISIS, blew the ball out of the park and so our heroes are left to deal with the memory tampering that they did with the villains but also with Batman. Crisis of ethics come into play with this collection and along with that the return of the villains memories, which lends them to resume their attacks on our heroes on a more personal scale for they already know of our superheroes true identity as well as personal lives. So what's the logical step to do in order to protect the one you love? Lois lane has been hurt as well as Bruce's on and off girlfriend, Selena Kyle, aka. Catwoman. Do you repeat what was done by lobotomizing the villains again or does ethic dictate that one stays thy hand, or this case, Zatanna's magical hand, and look for a solution. This Aftermath issue for me will only work if one has read, IDENTITY CRISIS. And since the New 52 has already happened, all these past crisis are moot. But for those who enjoyed the world of DC before the New 52, then this is a must!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Berk

    Crisis of Conscious acts as a aftermath to Identity Crisis. But it takes place after the OMAC project. And to start I really liked Identity Crisis and loved The OMAC project so I ended up really liking this too. I think they’re good comics and they’re definitely more interesting then the Justice League since 2011 (though at this time I’ve read none of Scott Snyder’s League except for they first issue). It’s got a good lineup of hero’s and other than the threat being some bigger conspiracy (it’s al Crisis of Conscious acts as a aftermath to Identity Crisis. But it takes place after the OMAC project. And to start I really liked Identity Crisis and loved The OMAC project so I ended up really liking this too. I think they’re good comics and they’re definitely more interesting then the Justice League since 2011 (though at this time I’ve read none of Scott Snyder’s League except for they first issue). It’s got a good lineup of hero’s and other than the threat being some bigger conspiracy (it’s always a big conspiracy) it’s really solid and fun to read and drawn well and has good moments for all the heroes. I think this should be in the collection with Identity Crisis but then I wouldn’t have to buy it again. 4 stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Warren

    Countdown to Infinite Crisis

  7. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    A really good follow-up to Identity Crisis.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Good treatment of the fallout of Identity Crisis. For the record, I think this comic is some of the last we see of women-NOT-overposed-and-overexposed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jim C

    This is part of the fallout of the events of Identity Crisis. This one deals with the repercussions of the mind-altering done by some members of the Justice League. I really enjoyed the novel Identity Crisis and I am reading its side companion pieces. In that novel, a despicable event happened and the Justice League answered back by altering minds of several characters including Batman. Those characters have had their memories returned and they are not happy. I liked this collection but I was ho This is part of the fallout of the events of Identity Crisis. This one deals with the repercussions of the mind-altering done by some members of the Justice League. I really enjoyed the novel Identity Crisis and I am reading its side companion pieces. In that novel, a despicable event happened and the Justice League answered back by altering minds of several characters including Batman. Those characters have had their memories returned and they are not happy. I liked this collection but I was hoping for more of an impact. We have the question of "how far is too far" for punishment and the enforcers of this punishment. I wish that this book delved into that a little more but instead the book focused on the physical fighting. The artwork was terrific and if you a fan of Catwoman, you will enjoy this as I thought she was the stand out of this collection. This was an enjoyable read but I thought it could have been better. I believe the problem is that this was filler between two major events in this universe and the writer was restricted with his story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    I really enjoyed this one. It's one for you, even if you aren't much of a comic book reader. It explores deep themes of love, marriage and loss. It's a bit of a sad read if you know the characters of the DC universe. Some key individuals die. But how the themes are dealt with was surprisingly mature. I learned a few things from it, like how the perpetuity of love after someone passes away can be a comforting and positive thing, not just another reminder of sorrow. I really enjoyed this one. It's one for you, even if you aren't much of a comic book reader. It explores deep themes of love, marriage and loss. It's a bit of a sad read if you know the characters of the DC universe. Some key individuals die. But how the themes are dealt with was surprisingly mature. I learned a few things from it, like how the perpetuity of love after someone passes away can be a comforting and positive thing, not just another reminder of sorrow.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Irenski

    Picking up where Identity Crisis ended this book is the failing apart of the JLA. While I urge readers to read Identity Crisis first, the book really captures what makes the Justice League so great while also tearing them apart.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Despite some logic and ethics issues (who cares if we mindwipe badguys) this was still pretty fast paced and fun. Geoff Johns is definitely my favorite DC writer. He rules. I love how he contrasts the personalities of the various Leagers. The big fight towards the end was exciting. I also really liked this art. This is the best arc of the whole Countdown to Infinite Crisis set. Def worth a read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rob McMonigal

    This trade follows the revelations of Identity Crisis, the point at which DC decided that "Lo, there Comes a Crisis..." means a yearly crossover. This is the start of the end for the DC Universe that Byrne, Giordano, and Stern created lo those many years ago. Bats flips at the news that his "friends" in the JLA have wiped his mind, the League fights over whether or not it was right, Superman plays dumb, and the next thing you know. villains are attacking secret identities, J'ohnn is accused of b This trade follows the revelations of Identity Crisis, the point at which DC decided that "Lo, there Comes a Crisis..." means a yearly crossover. This is the start of the end for the DC Universe that Byrne, Giordano, and Stern created lo those many years ago. Bats flips at the news that his "friends" in the JLA have wiped his mind, the League fights over whether or not it was right, Superman plays dumb, and the next thing you know. villains are attacking secret identities, J'ohnn is accused of being no better than Zatanna, and oh yeah, we get a super surprise Guest Villain. The Cliff Notes version of all this? Geoff Johns does Avengers Disassembled. That's not to say this is a bad story. In fact, given what happens in the mini-series, for anything *other* than this to occur would make no sense. When Bats goes against the League, the League falls because he's the brains holding it together. When Supes gives up on the League and lets himself get played, the League falls because he's the heart holding it together. There was only one thing that was going to happen when the dust cleared--a League unable to sustain itself. There are some really great moments here--Johns handles the Bats-Catwoman interplay well, for instance, especially when she shows that she wants to be with him and not the villaisn with whom she used to associate. He also gets the Carter-Ollie dynamic going well. But some of the others--Hal and Wally in particular, seem to be playing the roles the writers want for them, rather than using their natures to tell the story. (In fact, Wally gets a little mental whiplash--he's against the mindwipe in his own book but appears to be for it here.) Martian Manhunter also seems to be playing the role of "Everyman" rather than that of the league's core. I think the biggest problem here--and one that's plaguing DC and Marvel very badly right now--is that these are no longer stories written for their own sake. This is an arc entirely devoted to clean up and set up. Can it be a good story? Sure. It can even be a great story. But to my mind, a comic has to stand on its own two legs, not be propped up by the uber-plot of the year (or in this case, years). There's a way this could have been handled to do that, but it would have meant more talking and less action. In a slugfest against a whole slew of League villains, there's simply not enough time for such things as real character development, beyond the obvious. It's a shame, really. However, to get the full picture, of today's DCU, this is a must-read. (Library 01/08) Trebby's Take: Helps move the big picture along, doesn't really shine as a League story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    At the time it was first published (first as monthly issues, then as a trade paperback) it capitalised on the reveal (from Identity Crisis) that even Batman had been mind-wiped. Ooooh! The Justice League is self-destructing to begin with, but then comes along Despero and the Secret Society of Super-Villains to make matters worse. Today, years later, this has become a forgotten, irrelevant storyline, in light of the many "Crises" that DC has gone through, not to mention the many series/character r At the time it was first published (first as monthly issues, then as a trade paperback) it capitalised on the reveal (from Identity Crisis) that even Batman had been mind-wiped. Ooooh! The Justice League is self-destructing to begin with, but then comes along Despero and the Secret Society of Super-Villains to make matters worse. Today, years later, this has become a forgotten, irrelevant storyline, in light of the many "Crises" that DC has gone through, not to mention the many series/character reboots. It's like the events of this book are (now) from another continuity, which in fact is what they've become. Some good moments here, but nothing spectacular, nothing that survived the subsequent re-shuffling of the DC Universe. Ideal for completists, but that's it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    J.M. Hushour

    Zatanna, Zatanna, Zatanna...I don't care how good you look in your velvet tophat and fishnet stockings, you should know better than to try and erase Batman's FREAKIN' MEMORY, because only bad things will happen. Like Batman beating up Hawkman and quitting the Justice League kind of bad. Oh, right, do one better JLA (this should stand for Jiant Lame Asses) and alienate Bats from his only real steady lay, Catwoman. And, yes! Yes! while you're at it, imprison a parallel Earth's Superboy in another Zatanna, Zatanna, Zatanna...I don't care how good you look in your velvet tophat and fishnet stockings, you should know better than to try and erase Batman's FREAKIN' MEMORY, because only bad things will happen. Like Batman beating up Hawkman and quitting the Justice League kind of bad. Oh, right, do one better JLA (this should stand for Jiant Lame Asses) and alienate Bats from his only real steady lay, Catwoman. And, yes! Yes! while you're at it, imprison a parallel Earth's Superboy in another dimension where he can coldly plot the evisceration of the entire DC multiverse! Idiots! This is the reason why Batman is so much better than, say, Aquaman. Bats would never leave a litany of bad decisions in his wake.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matej

    JLA: Crisis of Conscience collects JLA issues #115-119 that answer some of the unanswered questions left from the Identity Crisis. The plot is surprisingly interesting, the story moves rather quickly and it ends on a pretty big cliffhanger. The art is pretty clean and simplistic, and although it looks great, it is not that memorable. Overall, this is a quick and interesting aftermath to the Identity Crisis. JLA: Crisis of Conscience collects JLA issues #115-119 that answer some of the unanswered questions left from the Identity Crisis. The plot is surprisingly interesting, the story moves rather quickly and it ends on a pretty big cliffhanger. The art is pretty clean and simplistic, and although it looks great, it is not that memorable. Overall, this is a quick and interesting aftermath to the Identity Crisis.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Daniels

    The misuse of their superpowers leads members of the Justice League of America to reconsider being a team in JLA: Crisis of Conscience. Following a number of stories preceding it, this graphic novel represents the struggle of a team to work together when its members are in conflict over one another's actions, even when those actions were aimed at serving the greater good -- to prevent evil from prevailing. The misuse of their superpowers leads members of the Justice League of America to reconsider being a team in JLA: Crisis of Conscience. Following a number of stories preceding it, this graphic novel represents the struggle of a team to work together when its members are in conflict over one another's actions, even when those actions were aimed at serving the greater good -- to prevent evil from prevailing.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

    This is a very good follow up to Identity Crisis. The repercussions of recent events have affected the Justice League in a major way. You see the unraveling of the JLA after Batman quits the team. That also sets the stage for Infinite Crisis.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Longer review possibly coming. ARTISTIC PRESENTATION: B to B plus; STORY/PLOTTING/PANELS: B plus; CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B; ACTION SCENES: B; JLA/JSA FOCUSES/MYTHOLOGY: B to B plus; WHEN READ: end of November 2013; OVERALL GRADE: B to B plus.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    A fast-moving look at a League that's crumbling. Good writing and solid art all throughout. There's just a few things that keep this from being a four-star book for me. The villains are built up to be a big time menace. Writers Geoff Johns and Allan Heinberg do a good job of making things feel different here: our heroes seem truly vulnerable. So it's disappointing to see the bad guys quickly dispatched so the Leaguers can stand around bickering about what to do with them. An underwhelming payoff A fast-moving look at a League that's crumbling. Good writing and solid art all throughout. There's just a few things that keep this from being a four-star book for me. The villains are built up to be a big time menace. Writers Geoff Johns and Allan Heinberg do a good job of making things feel different here: our heroes seem truly vulnerable. So it's disappointing to see the bad guys quickly dispatched so the Leaguers can stand around bickering about what to do with them. An underwhelming payoff to an intriguing buildup. My other issue is that this feels like one chapter in a rather long story (which it essentially is, as everything in the DC Universe was building up to Infinite Crisis at this point). A great deal has happened before the reader turns the first page and it's clear there's a lot more story to come by book's end. This is nothing new for modern mainstream comics but it feels a little more egregious here. This is a good read and, at only five issues, it's clear that more story could have been included to give the reader a more satisfying experience.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John

    JLA was a "Turn of the Century"/"Cusp of the Millenium" book. It had Grant Morrison, Mark Waid, and Joe Kelly. This was part of the shift where Geoff Johns started to take control, IMO. It was an arc that was fallout from Identity Crisis. When characters started to experience trauma from Death of Superman, Knightfall, Emerald Twilight, etc. He had worked extensively on JSA, but here is where we started working on the JLA, Green Lantern Rebirth and Infinite Crisis shortly thereafter. Johns was the JLA was a "Turn of the Century"/"Cusp of the Millenium" book. It had Grant Morrison, Mark Waid, and Joe Kelly. This was part of the shift where Geoff Johns started to take control, IMO. It was an arc that was fallout from Identity Crisis. When characters started to experience trauma from Death of Superman, Knightfall, Emerald Twilight, etc. He had worked extensively on JSA, but here is where we started working on the JLA, Green Lantern Rebirth and Infinite Crisis shortly thereafter. Johns was the "middleway" one of the writers who tried to balance the darkness with the light.

  22. 4 out of 5

    James J

    This follows on from the superb Identity Crisis and the quality certainly drops. It’s wasn’t bad, it just wasn’t in any way good. Felt like an unnecessary read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brannigan

    An awesome story that connects Identity Crisis with Infinite Crisis.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fizzgig76

    Reprints JLA #115-119 (August 2005-November 2005). The JLA are facing a moral dilemma in the form of a past that has come back to haunt them. The Justice League had decided to mind-wipe Doctor Sun after an attack on Sue Digby and used Zatanna to change the personalities of their enemies who discovered their secret identities. Now, the Justice League’s greatest enemies know what they did and their true identities and want revenge. As the JLA fights attacks while seeking the source of the enemies Reprints JLA #115-119 (August 2005-November 2005). The JLA are facing a moral dilemma in the form of a past that has come back to haunt them. The Justice League had decided to mind-wipe Doctor Sun after an attack on Sue Digby and used Zatanna to change the personalities of their enemies who discovered their secret identities. Now, the Justice League’s greatest enemies know what they did and their true identities and want revenge. As the JLA fights attacks while seeking the source of the enemies new found knowledge, they also must face Batman...who also was a victim of their past mistakes. Written by Geoff Johns and Allan Heinberg, JLA 18: Crisis of Conscience was illustrated by Chris Batista. The series was meant to fill in the gaps between the mini-series Identity Crisis and the series sweeping mini-series Infinite Crisis (the book was part of “Countdown to Infinite Crisis”). I find this period of DC a bit of their downfall. Identity Crisis was the start of the “not fun” DC. The ramifications of this series left the DC Universe shattered and created multiple mini-series that only made the events worse. JLA 18: Crisis of Conscience is a good example of this. The story in JLA 18: Crisis of Conscience is pretty splintered. The action and attack of the villains seems not well planned especially if it is Despero who plotted the whole thing. Here, we get unbalanced issues that leads to a conclusion that gives nothing to the casual reader...it ends in a bang. If you were to randomly pick up this comic and not know what happened before or after, it would be pointless to read. The problem is this whole “moral high ground” issue. The age old question of why superheroes don’t just kill the villains is a valid one but DC’s decision to shatter great teams feels like a fumble. JLA was a fun series before the whole Identity Crisis, and the deeper and deeper it fell into this whole pattern of mini-series, comics like the JLA suffered. The rights of super-villains might be an interesting subject to explore, but it doesn’t feel right for the series or the DC Universe’s standard comics. I always felt that there was an easy way out of the story explored in this volume. If Jean Loring had been the victim of the rape and was mindwiped, it would have explained her totally uncharacteristic murderous behavior in Identity Crisis and this volume could have dealt with the JLA realizing that they are responsible for Sue Digby’s death...It just would have been a more compelling story. JLA 18: Crisis of Conscience marked the penultimate volume of this series. The book feels like a bit of an ending. It doesn’t stand alone and ends in a cliffhanger which provides little resolution for readers who want a complete story. The JLA which started so grand ended with the next volume JLA 19: A World Without a Justice League.

  25. 5 out of 5

    M

    Geoff Johns is one of the best in the business at taking classic tropes, ideas, and characters, and breathing fresh life into them. In the 18th volume of JLA, Johns has the team deal with the fallout of the Identity Crisis storyline. With the truth about Dr. Light's mindwipe having surfaced, the team as a whole is falling apart. Making matters worse, the old-school Secret Society (Wizard, Felix Faust, Floronic Man, Matter Master, Chronos, and Star Sapphire) have had their minds restored by the a Geoff Johns is one of the best in the business at taking classic tropes, ideas, and characters, and breathing fresh life into them. In the 18th volume of JLA, Johns has the team deal with the fallout of the Identity Crisis storyline. With the truth about Dr. Light's mindwipe having surfaced, the team as a whole is falling apart. Making matters worse, the old-school Secret Society (Wizard, Felix Faust, Floronic Man, Matter Master, Chronos, and Star Sapphire) have had their minds restored by the alien conqueror Despero. Armed with the knowledge of the heroes' identities and loved one, the Society is back for revenge - and it's all part of Depero's plot to take over the entire team. Johns dusts off unused and "joke" characters from an old DC era, and brings them back with a vengeance. While it is tough to deal with a more modern and darker tone on the JLA, Johns is able to help integrate it with past events to help ease the transition. Granted, the new 52 initiative will wipe this from continuity, but kudos to the writer was elegantly dealing with the pitfalls and challenges of established continuity.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Crisis of Conscience. Of all the Infinite Crisis preludes, this one is the most obvious sequel to Identity Crisis. That's because it returns to the central question of stealing away free will from villains in order to protect heroes. It's rather joyful to see this so clearly a part of modern continuity and also to see the return of the classic Secret Society of Super-Villains, though there's a bit too much repetition of ground already covered by Identity Crisis and a bit too much fighting. This Crisis of Conscience. Of all the Infinite Crisis preludes, this one is the most obvious sequel to Identity Crisis. That's because it returns to the central question of stealing away free will from villains in order to protect heroes. It's rather joyful to see this so clearly a part of modern continuity and also to see the return of the classic Secret Society of Super-Villains, though there's a bit too much repetition of ground already covered by Identity Crisis and a bit too much fighting. This book is also another one that's a very clear prequel to Infinite Crisis as it ends on a cliffhanger (which unfortunately undercuts this story's independence a bit, but so it goes) [3+/5].

  27. 4 out of 5

    Angel

    I liked this one, but it felt a bit rushed. I was worried that readers who had not read Identity Crisis might miss out on quite a bit, but the volume gives you enough background and summary to catch up. This was good because I have read Identity Crisis, but it has been a while. In the aftermath of the events from Identity Crisis, the heroes have to deal with the consequences of their actions, including a bunch of villains very pissed off over what the league did to them last time. You get to dec I liked this one, but it felt a bit rushed. I was worried that readers who had not read Identity Crisis might miss out on quite a bit, but the volume gives you enough background and summary to catch up. This was good because I have read Identity Crisis, but it has been a while. In the aftermath of the events from Identity Crisis, the heroes have to deal with the consequences of their actions, including a bunch of villains very pissed off over what the league did to them last time. You get to decide how ethical or moral the league's actions were given their desire to protect loved ones. The volume does end in a cliffhanger, as it is setting up for the larger Infinite Crisis event (a volume I have also read). If nothing else, a nice quick read, but it is clear it is just a story to set up something bigger down the road.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    Rereading, this is a placeholder and not quite a story, set in between Identity Crisis and Infinite Crisis, ending in a cliffhanger - not clearly leading anywhere. It's well crafted, but without resolution. Script and art talent do not overcome continuity, bringing my opinion down. If you like the main Justice League characters, here they are, including the Geoff Johns version of Hawkman - and, well, each hero or heroine - current at the time. Despero is back to being, well, desperate, after a m Rereading, this is a placeholder and not quite a story, set in between Identity Crisis and Infinite Crisis, ending in a cliffhanger - not clearly leading anywhere. It's well crafted, but without resolution. Script and art talent do not overcome continuity, bringing my opinion down. If you like the main Justice League characters, here they are, including the Geoff Johns version of Hawkman - and, well, each hero or heroine - current at the time. Despero is back to being, well, desperate, after a mid-90s streak of mind-controlled heroism. Chris Batista draws well, and Rags Morales covers are top-notch. I like Allen Heinberg's scripts, and the collaboration here with Johns is tight, but, still tightly wound. Put it this way: the conscience remains in crisis. Justice League does not meet civil liberties. Mildly recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Acton Northrop

    Like the second half of "Superman: Grounded," this story tries to pick up the dangling plot threads and mangled characterizations from what went before and more or less shape them back into what passes for an actual superhero story. Fine artwork throughout from Chris Batista, some top notch throwdowns between the League and the Secret Society and Despero and some always-welcome spotlight on Catwoman. (Best of all, unlike "Identity Crisis," no rapes! What a concept!) If this story wasn't a bridge Like the second half of "Superman: Grounded," this story tries to pick up the dangling plot threads and mangled characterizations from what went before and more or less shape them back into what passes for an actual superhero story. Fine artwork throughout from Chris Batista, some top notch throwdowns between the League and the Secret Society and Despero and some always-welcome spotlight on Catwoman. (Best of all, unlike "Identity Crisis," no rapes! What a concept!) If this story wasn't a bridge between two of the worst comics of the past 20 years (the end leads directly into "Infinite Crisis"), I'd be fine with going a star higher.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Follows the dilapidated Identity Crisis arc. As the title suggests the JLA are having a tad of an issue regarding disposing the Secret Society of Villains' knowledge of the JLA's identities and families. Ironic considering how the JLA played mind-fuckery with the baddies and even their own. Mainly this book is only good to see how Batman loses it with his fellow JLA peers at having his mind screwed over by Zatanna for their convenience. Oh and some lovely Bat/Cat moments, but that's another stor Follows the dilapidated Identity Crisis arc. As the title suggests the JLA are having a tad of an issue regarding disposing the Secret Society of Villains' knowledge of the JLA's identities and families. Ironic considering how the JLA played mind-fuckery with the baddies and even their own. Mainly this book is only good to see how Batman loses it with his fellow JLA peers at having his mind screwed over by Zatanna for their convenience. Oh and some lovely Bat/Cat moments, but that's another story.

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