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30 review for Old Testament:King James Bible (audiobook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    It took me about 2.5 years, but I finished it! Cover to cover! I’m happy to say I’ve now read the entire Bible! (I have already read The New Testament several times.) I learned new things and gained new perspectives on God’s interactions with his children in ancient times. It was a different era back then, but there are many relevant stories to apply to today.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    My first serious attempt to read the Old Testament took place during my sophomore year in high school, and it ended that same year somewhere in the middle of Leviticus. (All that stuff in the Law of Moses about cleansing rituals after menstruation and copulation was just a bit much for me at the time…) At other times, I’ve read various books of the Old Testament -- Genesis, Exodus, Ruth, Esther, Isaiah, Psalms and Proverbs, Daniel, Jonah -- and studied passages and stories from throughout the tex My first serious attempt to read the Old Testament took place during my sophomore year in high school, and it ended that same year somewhere in the middle of Leviticus. (All that stuff in the Law of Moses about cleansing rituals after menstruation and copulation was just a bit much for me at the time…) At other times, I’ve read various books of the Old Testament -- Genesis, Exodus, Ruth, Esther, Isaiah, Psalms and Proverbs, Daniel, Jonah -- and studied passages and stories from throughout the text (a favorite has always been 1 Samuel 1). But in fall 2008, I was inspired by my interfaith work, my time at Harvard Hillel, and Scott’s example to finally complete a front-to-back read-through. And so it began, again. And then it stalled. For a year or two. I renewed my efforts in 2010 and got to the middle of 1 Kings, before stalling again. Then in fall 2012, I returned, reviewed, picked back up where I left off, and read more or less steadily after that, mostly just a chapter or two each night. I made the most rapid progress once Atticus was born and I started reading on my smartphone whenever I nursed him. (Which, incidentally, amounts to a lot of time during the day!) One of my more poignant experiences in this journey took place when I read this passage from the last chapter of Isaiah while nursing Atticus: 10 Rejoice ye with Jerusalem, and be glad with her, all ye that love her: rejoice for joy with her, all ye that mourn for her: 11 That ye may suck, and be satisfied with the breasts of her consolations; that ye may milk out, and be delighted with the abundance of her glory. 12 For thus saith the Lord, Behold, I will extend peace to her like a river, and the glory of the Gentiles like a flowing stream: then shall ye suck, ye shall be borne upon her sides, and be dandled upon her knees. 13 As one whom his mother comforteth, so will I comfort you; and ye shall be comforted in Jerusalem. Beyond this, I was moved by the many other passages of lyrical prose in Isaiah. But I enjoyed Psalms less than expected. While there are some beautiful songs, more of the psalms than I realized basically involved David asking God to punish his enemies--not particularly charitable of him… At the same time, I enjoyed Ecclesiastes more than expected. It advanced what struck me as a sage perspective on life: we should feel gratitude for the giftedness of life and its simple pleasures, as a way to alleviate the disappointment and emptiness that accompanies insatiable ambition. I was perplexed by the book of Job. (Seriously, still confused -- if anyone knows of a good exegesis of Job, please point me to it.) But at a basic level, I felt that the narrative in Job is quite contrary to what I had expected: Rather than having “the patience of Job,” Job is actually a chronic complainer (not that I blame him… some pretty awful stuff happened to him) who repeatedly blames, accuses, and questions God. He ultimately repents of this perspective after being called to do so by God, however, so I guess it ends happily. I enjoyed reading about all of the temple rites, covenants, and imagery, and finding echoes of those things in my own experiences with the LDS temple ceremonies. I appreciated coming to understand more about the symbolic role of the tribe of Ephraim in the House of Israel. I found more meaning than ever before in the opening chapters of Genesis, and in the covenant Abraham made with the Lord. I found Ezekiel’s visions to be pretty trippy. I remain most curious about the historical period covered in the book of Judges. Some new favorite scriptures: 2 Kings 4:13 And he said unto him, Say now unto her, Behold, thou hast been careful for us with all this care; what is to be done for thee? wouldest thou be spoken for to the king, or to the captain of the host? And she answered, I dwell among mine own people. 2 Chronicles 32:31 Howbeit in the business of the ambassadors of the princes of Babylon, who sent unto him to inquire of the wonder that was done in the land, God left him, to try him, that he might know all that was in his heart. Ecclesiastes 2:4-12 4 I made me great works; I builded me houses; I planted me vineyards: 5 I made me gardens and orchards, and I planted trees in them of all kind of fruits: 6 I made me pools of water, to water therewith the wood that bringeth forth trees: 7 I got me servants and maidens, and had servants born in my house; also I had great possessions of great and small cattle above all that were in Jerusalem before me: 8 I gathered me also silver and gold, and the peculiar treasure of kings and of the provinces: I gat me men singers and women singers, and the delights of the sons of men, as musical instruments, and that of all sorts. 9 So I was great, and increased more than all that were before me in Jerusalem: also my wisdom remained with me. 10 And whatsoever mine eyes desired I kept not from them, I withheld not my heart from any joy; for my heart rejoiced in all my labour: and this was my portion of all my labour. 11 Then I looked on all the works that my hands had wrought, and on the labour that I had laboured to do: and, behold, all was vanity and vexation of spirit, and there was no profit under the sun. 12 ¶And I turned myself to behold wisdom, and madness, and folly: for what can the man do that cometh after the king? even that which hath been already done. Ecclesiastes 3:9-13 9 What profit hath he that worketh in that wherein he laboureth ? 10 I have seen the travail, which God hath given to the sons of men to be exercised in it. 11 He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end. 12 I know that there is no good in them, but for a man to rejoice, and to do good in his life. 13 And also that every man should eat and drink, and enjoy the good of all his labour, it is the gift of God. Jeremiah 36:3 It may be that the house of Judah will hear all the evil which I purpose to do unto them; that they may return every man from his evil way; that I may forgive their iniquity and their sin. Daniel 3:18 (“But if not...”) 17 If it be so, our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace, and he will deliver us out of thine hand, O king. 18 But if not, be it known unto thee, O king, that we will not serve thy gods, nor worship the golden image which thou hast set up. More broadly, after these five long years of Old Testament reading, what have I learned? What themes have I taken away from the text? I admit I sort of began the Old Testament mentally prepared to do battle with it, to tackle it, to treat it like a long, hard slog… a slog filled with genocidal maniacs, idol worshippers, scheming dowagers, and gang rapists. And yeah. There was that. o_O But there was also so much more than that. Innumerable lessons of inestimable worth. -- It is true that the God of the Old Testament is a god of jealousy, wrath, and vengeance. Indeed, Jehovah is an emotional, not passionless, God. But above all, He is a God of lovingkindness. He does not desire to inflict suffering upon his people. He sorrows at our pain and desires to show us mercy. He is a giving God that blesses His people in abundance and looks for any opportunity, any excuse to do so. He is both a Father and a husband to the people of Israel. -- God is angered by the abomination of idol worship and the defilement of His holy temple. But to an equal or greater degree, He hates the way His people oppress the poor and needy, the stranger, the widow, the lame and afflicted. He chastises them for their greed, their usury, their exploitation and corruption. He hates their pride, especially the pride of their priests and rulers. He abhors their violence and bloodshed. -- The law of Moses is a charitable law -- it emphasis the mercy and forgiveness of God, and it calls upon the Israelites to exercise that same mercy and forgiveness toward their fellow men -- toward debtors and servants, toward strangers and Gentiles. -- Jehovah values the condition of the heart over outward ritualistic observance. In fact, contrary to prevailing Christian narratives, Jesus was not necessarily radical in His criticism of the ruling religious elites but was rather following the pattern of many Old Testament prophets before Him who had chastised Israel for the sin of hypocrisy. -- Prophecy is not determinative. Often, prophecy is simply a means God uses to warn His people to repent. He would rather they repent than the prophecy be fulfilled. (See the book of Jonah, Jeremiah 36:3). -- God engages in dialogue with His prophets, and He will sometimes change his mind as His servants the prophets plea and bargain on behalf of the people of Israel. (Evident in God’s conversations with Moses, Jeremiah, Daniel, and more.) -- Jehovah calls upon the weak, the meek, the stuttering, the uncharismatic to be His servants. His prophets and servants often do not come from the halls of power, ecclesiastical or otherwise. -- God is in control of the nations and the events of world politics (Daniel 4:17). He allows and sometimes uses wicked, profane leaders and nations to wage conquest and war to accomplish his purposes, such as the punishment of wayward Israel. (But at the end of the day, they’ll be punished for their wickedness too.) He is also the great creator who controls the forces of nature and uses those to punish the wicked and bless the righteous. (I can’t say that I’m particularly persuaded by these principles, but it’s definitely something taught by the prophets of the Old Testament.) I’m grateful for this experience, grateful for the Old Testament, grateful for all the scribes and prophets and translators throughout history who have made it possible for these words to be passed down to us. I’m grateful to God for providing us with these words through his imperfect messengers. And I am grateful for the way these words have facilitated a process of learning, growth, and revelation for me these past years.

  3. 4 out of 5

    NaDell

    Started reading the Old Testament again the first day of 2012 until September 22nd when I finished it. One of the best things I learned was that God definitely has an order to things. There are reasons for the way he commands us to do things, even if we can't see the reasons behind it. Started the Old Testament again in 2018. I accepted a challenge from a friend this year to read the Bible by the end of the year and just finished. It was good to remember all of the things that were told to people Started reading the Old Testament again the first day of 2012 until September 22nd when I finished it. One of the best things I learned was that God definitely has an order to things. There are reasons for the way he commands us to do things, even if we can't see the reasons behind it. Started the Old Testament again in 2018. I accepted a challenge from a friend this year to read the Bible by the end of the year and just finished. It was good to remember all of the things that were told to people all throughout time to bless and benefit them and to help them to return to live with Heavenly Father again. I think it's easy for us to say, "Why didn't they just listen to Moses? All they had to do was keep the commandments and they wouldn't have had to wander the desert for 40 years!" But it's harder for us to examine ourselves and whether we are doing all that we need to do to not be 'wandering in the desert'. I was surprised nearly daily how the Old and New Testament reading I did was often about the same things. Scriptures are for us to read and to learn from.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This was my first time reading straight through, every word. Of course I sped-read through the long lists genealogies and contents of the temples, etc. I was really struck at how God always remembers his covenants and is always willing to take those with whom he has made covenant back into his favor, always waiting with open arms. One sign of his mercy is sending messengers or prophets to his children. This time reading through I was really struck by a vision of the image of the kind woman from This was my first time reading straight through, every word. Of course I sped-read through the long lists genealogies and contents of the temples, etc. I was really struck at how God always remembers his covenants and is always willing to take those with whom he has made covenant back into his favor, always waiting with open arms. One sign of his mercy is sending messengers or prophets to his children. This time reading through I was really struck by a vision of the image of the kind woman from Shunem or the Shunemmite, riding forward, in shock but undaunted in her faith to find the prophet after her son had died.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Blaine Riesberg

    Shout out to Hugo and Jake, it's been a blast!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Griffiths

    Replete with, genocide, infanticide, fratricide, sexual slavery, indentured servitude, polygamy, racism, tribalism, torture, and worse, all condoned by a supposed god. Also replete, with anachronisms, known forgeries, contradictions, and provably untrue mythological stories and fictional charcters. This book makes extraordinary claims that are not supported by evidence. most of the falsifiable claims have been proven false. There isnt a 8 year old child on the planet that couldn't improve on the Replete with, genocide, infanticide, fratricide, sexual slavery, indentured servitude, polygamy, racism, tribalism, torture, and worse, all condoned by a supposed god. Also replete, with anachronisms, known forgeries, contradictions, and provably untrue mythological stories and fictional charcters. This book makes extraordinary claims that are not supported by evidence. most of the falsifiable claims have been proven false. There isnt a 8 year old child on the planet that couldn't improve on the "wisdom" and "morality" of this book. Humanity would be far better off leaving this bronze age morality behind.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    The star rating system just seems inappropriate for this book. I listened to the cd version from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for several months while getting ready in the mornings. My mind wandered often. But, I enjoyed hearing the familiar stories that I had heard all my life and was surprised by how violent people were in the name of religion. Things never change.

  8. 4 out of 5

    KT

    4 1/2 stars because although I consider this holy writ and I think the KJV is fabulous (read Wide as the Waters for the story of the English Bible), the editors/compilers over the years could have edited it for clarity and content, I think. I'm sorta kidding. I do take some of the stuff with a grain of salt, however, and chalk it up to some things being lost in translation/editing/the ages.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Schexnayder

    Epic, the story of a nation and its failure to keep its covenant with God, this is the classic object lesson for all of human society, which is why it has stood the test of time like no other ancient record.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Steve Hendricks

    Dense and weird which I guess is what makes it cool? Good stuff in here to throw down Tarantino style if you need to say some hard stuff before you break someone off

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Packer

    Loved that I have actually made it through the Old Testament!

  12. 5 out of 5

    James

    a few takeaways: the god of wrath is preferable to the god of love; no one is good, everyone is bad, and there is no sympathy for those who cross the lord; much of the criticism seems to come from those peoples who are simply caught up in a bad crowd, epoch, or tribe; i have actually come to favour petty authority to sappy vacancy; highlights outside the pentateuch include judges and daniel; psalms is pure mush

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    Reading the entire Old Testament is the ultimate act of perseverance. I did so only once before when I had much more time to dedicate to the endeavor. This time around was more challenging to my Internet-fragmented brain, but I am glad I stuck with it. Just a couple of questions: Chronicles were important to include why, exactly? Haha

  14. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

    I won’t read it through again... however, as my study by topic takes me there, I’ll gladly go. Basically from Job on, it is wonderful to read. The last books and chapters are filled with prophecy about the coming Savior and His subsequent second coming.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    I have to admit that I struggled with some of the parts of the Old Testament. I thought some of the language was difficult to understand even with the guide. But we muddled through. We finished. Hooray.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David McArthur

    I believe everyone should read The Old Testament from cover to cover every 30 years or so. I'm glad I have. I just hope I don't live another 30 years.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    Reading the Old Testament was difficult at times, but it was important for me to read this Holy Book. I learnt a lot.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

    That its the most wonderful book ever written.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stela Idrizi

    Loved it! So beautiful and so many lessons to learn. One of my favorite books for sure ❤️

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tucker Bateman

    It only took me 5 years to read it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Clark

    I re-read this during the school year as part of my church assignment to teach 14 high school-aged kids the Old Testament in an early morning seminary class. The narrative parts (that tell a story) are definitely more digestible than the prophecies, but those are important for a different reason. I think that God has two main sides to His character: mercy and justice. The mercy "God is love" side of things is definitely harder to see in the Old Testament, and the justice "repent or you will be d I re-read this during the school year as part of my church assignment to teach 14 high school-aged kids the Old Testament in an early morning seminary class. The narrative parts (that tell a story) are definitely more digestible than the prophecies, but those are important for a different reason. I think that God has two main sides to His character: mercy and justice. The mercy "God is love" side of things is definitely harder to see in the Old Testament, and the justice "repent or you will be destroyed" side is on every other page. But both are definitely there! The harsh justice, the book's extreme length, and the difficulty in understanding it are probably the biggest hurdles. But there are some exquisite gems hidden among the 1000+ pages! And the promises are still sure. Best of luck to any who are going to tackle this beast of a book!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    My goal was to read the Old Testament, and it took me 2 years. This was my second time, the first time I read it was about 30 years ago. I won't even claim I understood it, maybe 1/3 of it was understandable. The familiar stories of the Old Testament are wonderful and great to get reacquainted with. I want to reread and study Zechariah with a commentary to understand that book even better because it felt like that had some very important stuff in it that I couldn't quite grasp. I'm not going to My goal was to read the Old Testament, and it took me 2 years. This was my second time, the first time I read it was about 30 years ago. I won't even claim I understood it, maybe 1/3 of it was understandable. The familiar stories of the Old Testament are wonderful and great to get reacquainted with. I want to reread and study Zechariah with a commentary to understand that book even better because it felt like that had some very important stuff in it that I couldn't quite grasp. I'm not going to rate it with stars. In another 10 years I may just read it again and hopefully I'll understand even more.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    Always interesting. I must admit that this time through, I scanned some of the chapters in Leviticus, Numbers, I Chronicles, and Song of Solomon. But read every word of the remaining books and chapters. My study system is to read until done, then start over. So I'm already well into it again. I just forgot to record it when I finished it in February. May 3, 2018 finished again. Read in its entirety except for some scanning as the last time.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sean O'Donnell

    Finally sat down and read the whole Old Testament cover to cover. I've read large portions over the years, but never read it straight through. I'm so glad I did. What an experience. I felt so much closer to God. I learned that the God of the Old Testament is loving and forgiving and keeps his promises. I am so grateful for the good in the world inspired by this miraculous book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    The Old Testament is a work of beauty and truth. I have read it several times, and each time has been a time of edification and strength. The symbolism is difficult, but much has been learned over the last few years which makes understanding easier.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Luetta

    A book all should read and incorporate the lessons of life taught in its pages into ones personal life.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Finished for the first time completely!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    Wow! I didn't know about the hidden treasures found in the book of Zechariah about the Lord's second coming . . . what a nice finish along with Malachi.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    read LDS version of O.T. concurrently with "Verse by Verse, The Old Testament" by D. Kelly Ogden and Andrew Skinner. Goal was to read it during 2014.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Read the whole thing for seminary this year. Fabulous book!!!

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