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No money? No problem. You can start packing your bags for that trip you’ve been dreaming a lifetime about. For more than half a decade, Matt Kepnes (aka Nomadic Matt) has been showing readers of his enormously popular travel blog that traveling isn’t expensive and that it’s affordable to all. He proves that as long as you think out of the box and travel like locals, your tr No money? No problem. You can start packing your bags for that trip you’ve been dreaming a lifetime about. For more than half a decade, Matt Kepnes (aka Nomadic Matt) has been showing readers of his enormously popular travel blog that traveling isn’t expensive and that it’s affordable to all. He proves that as long as you think out of the box and travel like locals, your trip doesn’t have to break your bank, nor do you need to give up luxury. How to Travel the World on $50 a Day reveals Nomadic Matt’s tips, tricks, and secrets to comfortable budget travel based on his experience traveling the world without giving up the sushi meals and comfortable beds he enjoys. Offering a blend of advice ranging from travel hacking to smart banking, you’ll learn how to: * Avoid paying bank fees anywhere in the world * Earn thousands of free frequent flyer points * Find discount travel cards that can save on hostels, tours, and transportation * Get cheap (or free) plane tickets Whether it’s a two-week, two-month, or two-year trip, Nomadic Matt shows you how to stretch your money further so you can travel cheaper, smarter, and longer.


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No money? No problem. You can start packing your bags for that trip you’ve been dreaming a lifetime about. For more than half a decade, Matt Kepnes (aka Nomadic Matt) has been showing readers of his enormously popular travel blog that traveling isn’t expensive and that it’s affordable to all. He proves that as long as you think out of the box and travel like locals, your tr No money? No problem. You can start packing your bags for that trip you’ve been dreaming a lifetime about. For more than half a decade, Matt Kepnes (aka Nomadic Matt) has been showing readers of his enormously popular travel blog that traveling isn’t expensive and that it’s affordable to all. He proves that as long as you think out of the box and travel like locals, your trip doesn’t have to break your bank, nor do you need to give up luxury. How to Travel the World on $50 a Day reveals Nomadic Matt’s tips, tricks, and secrets to comfortable budget travel based on his experience traveling the world without giving up the sushi meals and comfortable beds he enjoys. Offering a blend of advice ranging from travel hacking to smart banking, you’ll learn how to: * Avoid paying bank fees anywhere in the world * Earn thousands of free frequent flyer points * Find discount travel cards that can save on hostels, tours, and transportation * Get cheap (or free) plane tickets Whether it’s a two-week, two-month, or two-year trip, Nomadic Matt shows you how to stretch your money further so you can travel cheaper, smarter, and longer.

30 review for How to Travel the World on $50 a Day: Travel Cheaper, Longer, Smarter

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jkhickel

    Matt Kepnes (1) gave a short but very informative interview in the New York Times about travel, which (2) drew me to his blog, which seems current, lively, and useful, so I figured I'd (3) take a chance and invest $15.00 in his travel book. Well, two out of three ain't bad...I guess. I was surprised that the advice in the book was so elementary. Join frequent flyer clubs, get a credit card that is affiliated with one or more of the clubs to maximize points, consider staying at a youth hostel, use Matt Kepnes (1) gave a short but very informative interview in the New York Times about travel, which (2) drew me to his blog, which seems current, lively, and useful, so I figured I'd (3) take a chance and invest $15.00 in his travel book. Well, two out of three ain't bad...I guess. I was surprised that the advice in the book was so elementary. Join frequent flyer clubs, get a credit card that is affiliated with one or more of the clubs to maximize points, consider staying at a youth hostel, use secondary airports, search the internet for cheap airline prices. Very little that I haven't already read several times somewhere else. Also, the thrust of the book was surprising to me. I'm an older (60+) occasional traveler, who considers the watch-out-for-the-hidden-fees world of travel costs to be alternately frustrating and scary, and I'm looking for protection. This book appears to be written for the youthful, carefree, sell-all-your-stuff-and-wander-the-world-for-a-year-or-more backpacking crowd. I really don't need a lot of advice about how to pare my possessions down to the minimum, and get rid of the stuff I don't need. Frankly, I love all my stuff -- PARTICULARLY the stuff I don't need! Directing people to sites such as Priceline and Hotwire (and their shadow sites), and Craig's List, isn't exactly cutting edge advice for a book that has a 2013 copyright date. I would recommend taking advantage of Kepnes's well-written blog, and pass on this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karen!

    This is definitely a book for rookies. Rookies who cannot use Google. Or common sense. It was anticipated that, weighing in at 316 pages, the "in-depth" region chapters were not remotely "in-depth". The majority of the specific advice is trite: join clubs and use sign-up bonuses on credit cards. Couch surf. Ride the bus or train instead of flying. If you're in a major city for a couple of days and are going to the major attractions, get one of those discount cards that you see advertised literal This is definitely a book for rookies. Rookies who cannot use Google. Or common sense. It was anticipated that, weighing in at 316 pages, the "in-depth" region chapters were not remotely "in-depth". The majority of the specific advice is trite: join clubs and use sign-up bonuses on credit cards. Couch surf. Ride the bus or train instead of flying. If you're in a major city for a couple of days and are going to the major attractions, get one of those discount cards that you see advertised literally everywhere. In countries with potable tap water, use a refillable water bottle. Really, dude? I also find it odd that a lot of his advice on how to save money and budget is to seriously skimp on food. Should one eat out for every meal? No. Should one eat at hotdog stands in Sweden? Hells No. Don't get me wrong, I hit up the grocery store when I'm travelling, but not for every meal. Oh well. If you are a complete rookie, check it out from the library, or scope out this guy's blog. If your budget it really this tight, you can't afford this book anyway.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Yazeed AlMogren

    This book was written for Americans, you will not see any tips for travel inside United States, but so far if you want to travel the world you will find a very helpful tips that will let you see a lot of countries with even a bare-bone budget.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    If you haven’t already been bitten by the travel bug, this comprehensive guide to traveling to places well-traveled or isolated will certainly do the trick. Author Matt Kepnes himself notes that the tips in How to Travel the World on $50 a Day: Revised: Travel Cheaper, Longer, Smarter come to an average of $50 per day: Obviously, travel in France and Germany will be more expensive, although that’s balanced out by travel in Central America and South Asia, which can run as low as $25 per day. I ha If you haven’t already been bitten by the travel bug, this comprehensive guide to traveling to places well-traveled or isolated will certainly do the trick. Author Matt Kepnes himself notes that the tips in How to Travel the World on $50 a Day: Revised: Travel Cheaper, Longer, Smarter come to an average of $50 per day: Obviously, travel in France and Germany will be more expensive, although that’s balanced out by travel in Central America and South Asia, which can run as low as $25 per day. I had just about given up on foreign travel before picking up this book. Matt Kepnes finally gave me hope that I, too, may someday will be able to stroll down the Avenue des Champs-Élysées despite my pitiful teacher’s salary.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chanel

    I don't want to rate this title, because it was not what I expected but I could see how it would be really helpful. There wasn't anything in here that was enlightening or groundbreaking about international travel. There was, however, a great compilation of information and resources about how to travel cheaply to destinations all over the world. I would only suggest this book to someone who is in the very early stages of planning an international trip who already has a clear destination or destina I don't want to rate this title, because it was not what I expected but I could see how it would be really helpful. There wasn't anything in here that was enlightening or groundbreaking about international travel. There was, however, a great compilation of information and resources about how to travel cheaply to destinations all over the world. I would only suggest this book to someone who is in the very early stages of planning an international trip who already has a clear destination or destinations in mind, is willing to take in a LOT of information, do their research, and has the time to sift through all of the helpful information provided by the author and his experiences/research.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    I came across this book while scanning the library shelves. I had never heard of Matt or read his blog. I never gave much thought to backpacking and after reading up on the hostel and backpacking scene on the Internet I realized that I would not be into either. I’m too square, too old and have always been too much of a non-wild introverted female. I do like to travel, but would not like to travel like Matt. I would not like Matt’s form of travel when it comes to hotels either. In my younger days I came across this book while scanning the library shelves. I had never heard of Matt or read his blog. I never gave much thought to backpacking and after reading up on the hostel and backpacking scene on the Internet I realized that I would not be into either. I’m too square, too old and have always been too much of a non-wild introverted female. I do like to travel, but would not like to travel like Matt. I would not like Matt’s form of travel when it comes to hotels either. In my younger days, I slept in vehicles on the side of the road and in rest stops—so I have done the cheapest of the cheap. I have also tent camped, but at this point in time, travel is not something I wish to do cheaper than I already do if it means having to find free places to stay. I travel with a husband and two daughters, so travel that does not include a hotel is not for me. I also do not like the amount of time Matt travels for. The longest I have ever traveled is a month with my husband and then toddler about 15 years ago. We tent camped, stayed in a few hotels and with family. It was a lot of fun and I could have traveled a bit longer back then. These days, however, I find that after two weeks away, I am ready to be home. Travel for the sake of traveling and traveling is not for me. I can only visit so many beaches, mountains, and tourist attractions, before I grow weary of it. Too much entertainment becomes too much entertainment just like too much work becomes too much work. Matt’s book introduced me to W woofing a kind of working vacation. No thank you. Why? Well, traveling or not, if you are working for room and board, it is still work and it still has a cost. It can also be potentially dangerous. Who pays if you get hurt on the farm? I find it hard to believe that a person will pay for travel insurance if they are not willing to pay for a decent hotel to stay in. A hotel stay is a sure thing. Travel insurance? You might not even end up using it. Of course if you chose to Wwoof and you get hurt without it…...good luck. Overall, this book was a miss for me. It might be useful for the young or inexperienced person who wants to backpack, couch-surf and work so they can spend an extended amount of time traveling. I’m not that person. Why? Matt’s form of traveling isn’t really travel in my opinion. It is just living a hobo lifestyle in the world. Homeless people do it all the time---only for a lot less than $50 a day and out of necessity. $50.00 a day seems luxurious for one person to spend while backpacking for a living. Also, you don’t really spend $50 a day. It is about averages. Matt’s average is $50 a day. That is what happens in Matt’s travel world. Some days he spends a lot and some days he spends a little or none by couch surfing and staying with friends. In my day to day existence I don’t stay anywhere for free nor do I eat for free, get free transportation or have free entertainment—tvs, computers and radios all require electricity or batteries. I don’t expect my travels to include free things I don’t normally get in my day to day life. I do expect my travels to include things I have in my day to day life like a bed, healthy food, shelter, and comfort in addition to it adding something interesting to my day. The more I think about it, $50 seems like way too much money to spend a day. I’m not even impressed with Matt’s average. I don’t partake in some of the high adrenaline activities Matt mentions, nor am I an avid drinker, or a big eater, if I ditched the husband and kids, I’m sure my average would probably be less. Since it is only the average that counts, I only have to throw in a enough nights on a friend’s or stranger’s couch to get to $50 or less---a tent on the side of the road where no one can see me would probably work as well. It works for many panhandlers. I’ll take a gun. In all of my travels, I have discovered that when it comes to travel, longer isn't necessarily better and cheaper isn't necessarily smarter. Sometimes you spend more upfront (Matt touches on this) but end up saving more in the long run. When it comes to expenses, I have found that most people don't agree on how much expensive is. What is expensive for someone else, might be cheap for me and vice versa. For example, I often hear people complain about food at zoos and amusement parks. I find them to be no more expensive than most fast food places. Knowing that the money goes back to either the zoo animals or an amusement facility I enjoy makes my meal more enjoyable than knowing it is simply going back to corporate headquarters. Some experiences are worth more to some people and less to others. Traveling what is best for you in time and expense is the smartest thing to do. Stay in those places you enjoy, travel to the places you enjoy and stay away from places you have doubts about. Budget more than you think you will need for your travels and you will never come home disappointed when you realize you still have cash in your pocket or in the bank. Budget the least amount for your travels and you will teach yourself to dread traveling.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Candice Walsh

    I consider myself an experienced traveller, and find myself learning a ton of new stuff. Especially when it comes to banking and exchange rates, cuz I'm just no good at that shiz. (Although most of the info is catered towards Americans, it's applicable to Canadians as well.) Just take into consideration that everything in this book is written from Matt's experience, and he really knows his stuff. But experiences may vary. Popped in to offer a review early, since it's ridiculous someone has rated I consider myself an experienced traveller, and find myself learning a ton of new stuff. Especially when it comes to banking and exchange rates, cuz I'm just no good at that shiz. (Although most of the info is catered towards Americans, it's applicable to Canadians as well.) Just take into consideration that everything in this book is written from Matt's experience, and he really knows his stuff. But experiences may vary. Popped in to offer a review early, since it's ridiculous someone has rated this with a one star before the book is even published. Ah, the Goodreads community.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Completely Melanie

    This book was so informative and incredibly helpful! I have already started using some of the tips that I have learned from this book and applying them to a trip I am taking this summer. I will probably even bring this book along with me over the summer as well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary Paul

    When I was considering backpacking Europe in the summer, I had a wide variety of enticing titles to choose from- "The Rough Guide", "The Savvy Backpacker", "The Lonely Planet Guide". Ooh, how Very! But how to choose? My answer was to look to the bloggers, look the folks who had actually done it. Look to the travelers on limited budgets and see what they say. Fortunately for me, one book came up over and over: "Travel the world on $50 a day". Matt Kepnes ("Nomadic Matt") has left a big footprint i When I was considering backpacking Europe in the summer, I had a wide variety of enticing titles to choose from- "The Rough Guide", "The Savvy Backpacker", "The Lonely Planet Guide". Ooh, how Very! But how to choose? My answer was to look to the bloggers, look the folks who had actually done it. Look to the travelers on limited budgets and see what they say. Fortunately for me, one book came up over and over: "Travel the world on $50 a day". Matt Kepnes ("Nomadic Matt") has left a big footprint in the budget-conscious travel world. His blog was full of interesting advice that was new even to me, a fairly seasoned traveler. I buckled down, bought the book, and shoved the extra half pound in my 20lb backpack. For the next two and a half months wandering Europe, it was my bible. From the first chapter, Matt saved me money. Although I knew about things like Skyscanner and Airbnb, I didn't know about Blabla car or workaway.org. Though it wasn't my first time around the block, I suddenly realized how much money I had been losing through poor exchange rates and foreign banking fees (!!) Thanks to Matt, my husband and I stayed in a Scottish castle for free for two weeks with a ragtag bunch of musicians. We met Italian bankers and Spanish cinematographers through ridesharing. We were even able to save 3% on all purchases and use points to pay for our flights home at the end of the journey. Matt motivated me on how travel is even cheaper than I had imagined and gave me the confidence and savvy to look into other more exotic areas. If my advice is unclear, even if this isn't your only travel guide, make sure it makes your list. You will be very grateful. Thanks a lot, Nomadic Matt. Travel safe everyone.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Steffani

    (NOTE: I was contacted by the author who was stunned I said there was no Europe section in my book. We have concluded that I must have been stuck with a weird misprinted copy, and since I worked in a bookstore for a few years, I know that can happen. I've left my review below as it was originally done, but I'll say that I'm now 250 days into being a nomad and this is one of the books that was hugely inspiring and helpful in getting me out there and living my dream. I'm glad Matt Kepnes reached o (NOTE: I was contacted by the author who was stunned I said there was no Europe section in my book. We have concluded that I must have been stuck with a weird misprinted copy, and since I worked in a bookstore for a few years, I know that can happen. I've left my review below as it was originally done, but I'll say that I'm now 250 days into being a nomad and this is one of the books that was hugely inspiring and helpful in getting me out there and living my dream. I'm glad Matt Kepnes reached out and checked in with me. I've changed my rating to 4 stars since the issue I had with the book is apparently not an issue but rather a publishing gaffe. C'est la vie!) This is sort of like two books in one. The first half is a must-read info for anyone seeking to travel the world -- but it's all very basic stuff. Nowhere did I see a recommendation to appoint an enduring power of attorney or more complicated advice like that. The second half only addresses certain regions of the world -- and doesn't include ANY advice on Europe, as if one cannot travel there affordably, and in all my research, it can certainly be done and done very, very nicely. Matt writes economically and clearly. There is no razzmatazz here but it's a practical look at how to get the finances tended to with your travel. If Asia and Australia are where you're seeking to travel, he's got a lot of information in the second half on that. But Europe, Africa, not so much. I was pretty resentful that it went into specific regions, actually, since that stuff's easy to find out on the web. I'll have to look for some other books in hopes they might have more insight.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Darcey

    I'm more than a little disappointed in the Kindle edition of this book. The structure is… okay; the writing style precisely what one would expect to see on Kepnes' site (which is good: he stays with his voice!) However, this did not cover anything new or groundbreaking that you wouldn't be able to find with some concerted searching on his blog, or on the internet in general. The travel regions he covers (Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, Central America & South America) are also ea I'm more than a little disappointed in the Kindle edition of this book. The structure is… okay; the writing style precisely what one would expect to see on Kepnes' site (which is good: he stays with his voice!) However, this did not cover anything new or groundbreaking that you wouldn't be able to find with some concerted searching on his blog, or on the internet in general. The travel regions he covers (Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, Central America & South America) are also easily covered on other sites. I had been hoping for information on Asia in general (China, India), Africa (Egypt specifically), Jordan (Asia/Middle East) and the border-crossing Turkey, as Egypt, Jordan and Turkey are all on my very-budget travel plan for this summer… And none of them were even given a mention; the closest it gets is mentions of Balkans train passes that may count Turkey in, and Royal Jordanian airlines as well as Egyptair. In short: Kepnes combines the contents of his blog for an easy one-stop reference, but I would suggest saving your money and getting the content - for free! - by browsing his, and other, blogs. There's nothing here that isn't there already: save the $10 for the Kindle version of the book and tuck it away for a hostel in Sultanahmet Square, Istanbul. If returning it were an option, I'd be doing so.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steven Grimm

    This is a super-practical book with a lot of up-to-date information. Based on my own travel experience, I think it comes pretty close to delivering on the promise in its title. I give it 4 stars as of March 2013. But the problem with this kind of book is that it will gradually get less accurate over time as its information falls out of date. For example, right now AirBnB may have few apartments listed in certain parts of South America as described in the book, but in a year or two maybe it'll in This is a super-practical book with a lot of up-to-date information. Based on my own travel experience, I think it comes pretty close to delivering on the promise in its title. I give it 4 stars as of March 2013. But the problem with this kind of book is that it will gradually get less accurate over time as its information falls out of date. For example, right now AirBnB may have few apartments listed in certain parts of South America as described in the book, but in a year or two maybe it'll increase in popularity and be the right go-to site for finding short-term housing. That said, it also works as inspiration: though the specifics will change over time, the general principles of not sticking to the typical (expensive) tourist path will likely be true for the foreseeable future. So it's worth reading as an exploration of possibilities, even for people who don't have any big trips planned in the near future.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maddy

    Holy shit, I finished this ages ago. Whoops. Pretty much changed my view of travelling from "something you save up oodles of money for and then splurge until it's done, and repeat" to "possibly, MAYBE something you could consider doing longer term despite not being rich." And it has some awesome tips for someone like moi who has never travelled in their life.

  14. 5 out of 5

    KATHERINE

    Basically stay in hostels cook food there and take public transportation or hitch hike.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marc

    Some useful tips and a decent price breakdown. Particularly helpful for those new to budget traveling internationally and want a quick comparison between the most visited international places. The downside is that despite being up "updated" I found myself thinking that most of the information was from trips around 2014. Websites and apps have changed quite a bit in some places, so don't really on this book too closely for the most up to date info.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Pickens

    This book is a good place to start in planning a trip, particularly for setting a budget for lodging and travel. I prefer to read his blog and Facebook articles as they are specific to traveling in certain areas.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Candice Walsh

    This is Matt's newest edition, with some additions and updates throughout. I forgot about how great of a resource this is. Mostly for new travellers, but still some great info in here if you're more seasoned!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    A good book full of good advice. I'm not sure if all the prices are current, but it's definitely a good starting point to have an idea of how much to budget per country and how to save while on the road.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Maryellen Edwards

    A really useful book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    There were a lot of informational nuggets in this book that I will definitely be using as I plan my next trips.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    This is a review of the 2015 version of this book, which is not listed on Goodreads. For the most part I enjoyed this guide. It was a quick read, at first glance it seems like a lot of info to take in but not everything in this book will apply to you. While in terms of long-term travel and in-depth travel hacking, I'm considered a rookie, most of this information I already know from a) experience and 2) other guides and blogs. For someone totally new to this concept, whether or not they've tra This is a review of the 2015 version of this book, which is not listed on Goodreads. For the most part I enjoyed this guide. It was a quick read, at first glance it seems like a lot of info to take in but not everything in this book will apply to you. While in terms of long-term travel and in-depth travel hacking, I'm considered a rookie, most of this information I already know from a) experience and 2) other guides and blogs. For someone totally new to this concept, whether or not they've traveled before, this could be a good thing. If you're used to traveling on the cheap: you're already a pro. While there's always new tips and tricks to be gleaned, checking out the author's blog, nomadicmatt.com, will give you a load of topics, and you can target what you're looking for specifically. He did reference quite a few credible sources, like thepointsguy.com and Benny of fluentin3months.com, both of which I was already familiar with. I liked that for information that was not his particular area of expertise, he used other people's examples, or at least used them to beef up his points. You could definitely benefit from "How to Travel the World on $50 a Day" if you have absolutely no clue about traveling and the travel industry. If you're fairly competent in the subject, you are not really going to gain any new information. To be honest, I was hoping for more "travel hacking" tips. While not the advertised book, it would have made this a bit more interesting and informational.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Damali

    I've never read any of these types of books, so I've obviously chosen the wrong one. So far, it's talked a lot of getting credit cards with points to save money on travel and from past experience, I prefer not to jump back into the credit card game at all, so none of it really applies to me. It's talked about getting airline deals. I more or less figured out my own system by having alerts sent to my email for two years, so I know what to expect for the lowest price for the places I plan to go, an I've never read any of these types of books, so I've obviously chosen the wrong one. So far, it's talked a lot of getting credit cards with points to save money on travel and from past experience, I prefer not to jump back into the credit card game at all, so none of it really applies to me. It's talked about getting airline deals. I more or less figured out my own system by having alerts sent to my email for two years, so I know what to expect for the lowest price for the places I plan to go, and I'm traveling during the cheapest part of the year. Travel insurance, I'm opting out of that also to save money. Moving back home to save money or renting out my house doesn't apply to me. It has given me a few websites that may be useful, but that's about it to far. To be continued...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alec Rigdon

    Matt Kepnes is perhaps the most accessible, relatable travel writer for those on a budget. His blog was a huge help for a recent international trip and this book provides a great resource for cheap travel. He covers his bases with tons of research. Unfortunately, his writing could use a lot of help. The book had many of awkward repeats and questionable structure issues. That said, $50 Dollars a Day is invaluable to travelers of all types.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Johnny Ward

    Save your money, it's like a hungry man asking for advice and being told to order a sandwich. Save money by staying in hostels, be from the US and collect airmiles on credit cards, ONLY go to places where there are literally thousands of tourists and use the internet to book flights. Not to mention the fact that having traveled around the world to literally almost every country in the word, $50 is a sexy title, but a false one too. Awful. Now wonderful, can you give me my four hours back :S

  25. 5 out of 5

    James

    This is the most inspiring book I've ever read - not because it's meant to be but because it's 100% practical. It makes the world feel so accessible.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anne - Books of My Heart

      I love to travel and this audio is non-fiction on how to do so at lower costs. It also seems timed right since summer is a big travel season.  It includes an introduction and three parts. Part One deals with planning your trip. Part Two is on the road expenses such as accommodations, food, transportation and activities. Part Three is regional information ( on the same things as Part Two)  including: Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, Central America, South America, China, India   I love to travel and this audio is non-fiction on how to do so at lower costs. It also seems timed right since summer is a big travel season.  It includes an introduction and three parts. Part One deals with planning your trip. Part Two is on the road expenses such as accommodations, food, transportation and activities. Part Three is regional information ( on the same things as Part Two)  including: Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, Central America, South America, China, India and Japan. The introduction is short and basically contains a list of questions which are answered later and a pep talk for those who are too afraid or think they don't have the money to travel. I found this boring since it didn't answer any questions and I don't need encouragement. I have traveled and will continue to travel. In the planning section, there are some good tips. Depending on your background, they may be helpful. I had two parents who grew up during the depression. I know almost all of the thrifty tips Matt shared. I know about the different banking options, travel reward credit cards, airline frequent flyer programs, hostels, hotel discount programs, etc.  The information on travel insurance was new to me and would be imperative for the longer trips. Some of the tips were stated repetitively. I recognize repetition as a key factor in learning, but I got it the first time. If I didn't, I can listen again. The information on purchasing a backpack was interesting. One would either need to take good notes or get this on Kindle so key details could be highlighted or bookmarked. The same is true for the lists of websites for researching things from airfares, to places to stay and sights to see. I don't know how to notate audio. After the planning and costs in general, How to Travel the World for $50 a Day goes into regions and covers places to stay, transportation, meals and sightseeing in somewhat more detail for the area. Again, the main tips are repeated from the general ones. The narrator does a very good job. His voice is very clear and easy to understand. He does say the websites and other information slowly enough one could write it down. The author is a youngish guy, now 36 who started longer-term traveling at 23. Many of the discounts are only available to students, which end somewhere in the 20s. Also, leaving your things at your parents' home and having them get your mail or pay your bills, is not going to work as well for someone in their 50s or 60s whose parents have died or are in assisted living. Travel lasting more than a few months is also harder for those with children, aging parents or pets. Overall, it is helpful but quite repetitive. I don't see how to go to a specific area of the audio, so an ebook would be more useful to me so I could highlight, take notes and search. The main way to travel cheap is hostels, couch-surfing, eat street food or cook at the hostel. For transportation use rewards points or find discount sale prices. There are some websites mentioned for budget hotels and transportation overseas which are not typically known to American travelers and would be helpful.     Read this review in its entirety at The Book Nympho

  27. 4 out of 5

    Firangiz

    Don’t let fears of danger or being too old stop you from traveling. Traveling doesn’t have to be too expensive and there are creative and effective ways to save money. Unless you’re a risk taker, or you plan on working while you travel, you’ll be making things easier for yourself by saving up money before departure. Cut costs on plane tickets by getting Round the World tickets and being flexible about times and destinations. Round the World Tickets (RTW) are offered by multiple airlines like Americ Don’t let fears of danger or being too old stop you from traveling. Traveling doesn’t have to be too expensive and there are creative and effective ways to save money. Unless you’re a risk taker, or you plan on working while you travel, you’ll be making things easier for yourself by saving up money before departure. Cut costs on plane tickets by getting Round the World tickets and being flexible about times and destinations. Round the World Tickets (RTW) are offered by multiple airlines like American Airlines. The more willing you are to make last-minute decisions about your travel times and destinations, the cheaper it will be. Midweek flights, early morning/late night departures are cheaper. Choose a functional backpack for your travels: waterproof, every compartment with 2 zippers, with lots of compartments. Set a budget, be smart about it. Set money aside for different categoies like accommodation, transportation, food. You can use CouchSurfing, Servas International, Hospitality club for accommodation. Save money on food by cooking your own meals and taking advantage of lunch specials. Australia is affordable if you house-sit, work for room and board and stay smart about food. You can do volunteer work on WWOOF. Southeast Asia is a great destination for the frugal traveler. More pricey are Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore and least are Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia. Traveling the world is not as dangerous or as expensive as you may think. You just have to let go of your need for luxurious accommodations and be willing to embrace your adventurous spirit. There are a number of ways that any traveler can easily cut costs. Chances are, you can travel the world and spend less money on a day-to-day basis than you are currently spending at home. Cut travel costs by budgeting and using hospitality exchange services. Get a travel credit card. These handy credit cards give you travel points every time you use them. This means you’ll eventually be able to fly at a very reasonable price, if not for free. These cards don’t charge any extra fees for overseas purchases, so if you’re planning to travel regularly, they are a sensible thing to have. *Read with Blinkist

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    While the book was good, there wasn't anything I couldn't find on 'Nomadic Matt's' blog/website. In fact, I did go on his website to find a very similar set-up in a post specifically for America. It's a good resource, especially if you're like me and prefer physical notes. One of it's biggest flaws is that it specifically focuses on overseas destinations; I skipped over half of the book because it was for a specific country or region. There is a new edition of this book, and it came out barely a While the book was good, there wasn't anything I couldn't find on 'Nomadic Matt's' blog/website. In fact, I did go on his website to find a very similar set-up in a post specifically for America. It's a good resource, especially if you're like me and prefer physical notes. One of it's biggest flaws is that it specifically focuses on overseas destinations; I skipped over half of the book because it was for a specific country or region. There is a new edition of this book, and it came out barely a week after I purchased this copy (so I was a little frustrated that I didn't know about it), and I wonder if the new edition would have more information about America because the author was doing a road-trip around America the last I checked. Overall, it was a decent read. Although I don't regret it, if I had the chance to do it over again, I would save the money and do an in-depth review of his website. The book just didn't exactly do as much to prepare me for my summer trip as I was hoping.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shelby

    I've had unfaltering wanderlust for over a year. I daydream about hopping on a plane and never coming back. Unfortunately, I'm pretty frugal and refuse to splurge on a random international vacation. I did, however, splurge on this book. The general premise of the book is well-meaning but improbable for most people, especially the target audience for this book. Live on $50 a day for a year, he says. It's less than you'd normally spend at home! His advice? Save up $18,000+ and sell all of your mater I've had unfaltering wanderlust for over a year. I daydream about hopping on a plane and never coming back. Unfortunately, I'm pretty frugal and refuse to splurge on a random international vacation. I did, however, splurge on this book. The general premise of the book is well-meaning but improbable for most people, especially the target audience for this book. Live on $50 a day for a year, he says. It's less than you'd normally spend at home! His advice? Save up $18,000+ and sell all of your material belongings. Not very realistic. First of all, saving up that much money isn't easy and is a very long process. So maybe don't travel the world for years. Despite this, there are a ton of very helpful tips and internet links to save you money. Albeit, some of it was obvious - travel credit cards, don't eat out, travel during off seasons - but some of it I wouldn't have thought of on my own. It's well-organized and easy to skip around to what you want to find! It even has a few helpful indexes in the back. Even if I never use any of this advice, it was interesting to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Erin Russell

    In general, this book assumes the reader has very little travel experience. The book is composed of three parts: 1 - Planning: Discussion of why travel is worthwhile, banking internationally, credit cards that can help you accumulate points redeemable for travel, what to look for in a backpack and a travel insurance policy. 2 - On-the-road expenses: A few interesting and novel ideas, including some sharing economy websites for meals, but a lot of this was pretty obvious. 3 - Breaking it down by reg In general, this book assumes the reader has very little travel experience. The book is composed of three parts: 1 - Planning: Discussion of why travel is worthwhile, banking internationally, credit cards that can help you accumulate points redeemable for travel, what to look for in a backpack and a travel insurance policy. 2 - On-the-road expenses: A few interesting and novel ideas, including some sharing economy websites for meals, but a lot of this was pretty obvious. 3 - Breaking it down by region (I didn't actually read this section - just skimmed it): The author estimates daily travel costs in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, SE Asia, Central America, S America, China, India and Japan. Some areas are >$50/day and some are less. All estimates are based on the author's travel style. All costs are given in USD.

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