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The Law of Divine Compensation: On Work, Money, and Miracles

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Marianne Williamson is a bestselling author (Return to Love, Healing the Soul of America), a world-renowned teacher, and one of the most important inspirational thinkers of our time. In The Law of Divine Compensation, she reveals the spiritual principles that help us overcome financial stress and unleash the divine power of abundance. A guru to anyone interested in spiritu Marianne Williamson is a bestselling author (Return to Love, Healing the Soul of America), a world-renowned teacher, and one of the most important inspirational thinkers of our time. In The Law of Divine Compensation, she reveals the spiritual principles that help us overcome financial stress and unleash the divine power of abundance. A guru to anyone interested in spirituality, Williamson's words ring with power and truth as she assures us that, with faith in God's promise of prosperity for all, we need never fear the future.


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Marianne Williamson is a bestselling author (Return to Love, Healing the Soul of America), a world-renowned teacher, and one of the most important inspirational thinkers of our time. In The Law of Divine Compensation, she reveals the spiritual principles that help us overcome financial stress and unleash the divine power of abundance. A guru to anyone interested in spiritu Marianne Williamson is a bestselling author (Return to Love, Healing the Soul of America), a world-renowned teacher, and one of the most important inspirational thinkers of our time. In The Law of Divine Compensation, she reveals the spiritual principles that help us overcome financial stress and unleash the divine power of abundance. A guru to anyone interested in spirituality, Williamson's words ring with power and truth as she assures us that, with faith in God's promise of prosperity for all, we need never fear the future.

30 review for The Law of Divine Compensation: On Work, Money, and Miracles

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    "Spiritual growth involves giving up the stories of your past so the universe can write a new one." I love Marianne Williamson books and this one is no exception. She reminds me that love is the most important thing and that miracles abound and transcend the laws on time and space. Her prayers are fabulous--each and every one. Here is an example: Dear God, I surrender to you who I am, what I have and what I do. May my life and talents be used in whatever way serves You best, I surrender to You my failur "Spiritual growth involves giving up the stories of your past so the universe can write a new one." I love Marianne Williamson books and this one is no exception. She reminds me that love is the most important thing and that miracles abound and transcend the laws on time and space. Her prayers are fabulous--each and every one. Here is an example: Dear God, I surrender to you who I am, what I have and what I do. May my life and talents be used in whatever way serves You best, I surrender to You my failures and any pain still in my heart. I surrender to You my successes, and the hopes that they contain. May the Light of Your Love shine deep within my heart, and extend through me to bless the world. Amen My favorite part of the book was an exercise in the chapter called "Positivity" where you list every one you have ever worked with and forgive and bless and thank them and then let them go. Then you do the same with those you currently work with. Then you visualize the perfect work situation and put it out there and ask for a miracle. I am happy with my current work and not looking for new work, but I still felt such peace after doing this exercise--like a huge weight was lifted. I am so grateful Marianne is in this world and writing books. Thank you God for Marianne. Amen.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kate Walker

    This is a slim but mighty volume filled with spiritual counsel related to matters of work and money. The book cover is a fetching shade of blue with a gold embossed design. The hardback cover underneath the jacket is a dark navy with the same gold accents. I so appreciate when the book designers pay attention to those kind of details. The paper, the typeset, the layout, all of it is very elegant. The message of the book, as I understand it, is that we should ask ourselves how we can best serve h This is a slim but mighty volume filled with spiritual counsel related to matters of work and money. The book cover is a fetching shade of blue with a gold embossed design. The hardback cover underneath the jacket is a dark navy with the same gold accents. I so appreciate when the book designers pay attention to those kind of details. The paper, the typeset, the layout, all of it is very elegant. The message of the book, as I understand it, is that we should ask ourselves how we can best serve humanity in our work, and that blessings, material and spiritual, flow back toward us when we offer up our work toward the greater good. "As long as we make love our bottom line, then our lives will naturally prosper." Rather than thinking about what's in it for us, we ought to concern ourselves with the question of how our work can best serve others. There are many prayers throughout the book in which we pray that God (or the Divine Guide within, if you prefer) will attune our minds toward love and service in all that we do. Miracles naturally flow from that prayerful state of consciousness, according to the "Divine Law of Compensation" as Ms. Williamson describes it in her book. For those of us in transition from one type of work to another, this is an interesting perspective to consider. By focusing on the spiritual element of our work, we put ourselves in the best position to receive the miracles that are happening all around us, if our eyes and hearts and minds are open to perceiving those miracles. It makes perfect sense to me and I intend to integrate these teachings into my own thinking about work, money and miracles.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sheryl Valentine

    Marianne was a very great teacher for me in my early years with "A course in Miracles". Over the years I have read all of her books, and while I have enjoyed them all in one way or another, this one is one of her better ones, up there with "The Gift of Change". We can always be reminded of the real "cause" of abundance and security. I also found many of the prayers sprinkled throughout the book to be perfect for me right now. Here is a favorite: Dear God, I surrender to You who I am, what I have an Marianne was a very great teacher for me in my early years with "A course in Miracles". Over the years I have read all of her books, and while I have enjoyed them all in one way or another, this one is one of her better ones, up there with "The Gift of Change". We can always be reminded of the real "cause" of abundance and security. I also found many of the prayers sprinkled throughout the book to be perfect for me right now. Here is a favorite: Dear God, I surrender to You who I am, what I have and what I do. May my life and talents be used in whatever way serves You best. I surrender to You my failures and any pain still in my heart. I surrender to You my successes, and the hopes that they contain. May the Light of Your Love shine deep within my heart, and extend through me to bless the world. Amen.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    Contemplating a career change, I recently consulted a career/life coach. She recommended this book after one of our discussions. So, I'll start by saying that I'm an atheist, non-theist, agnostic (whatever you want to call someone who doesn't subscribe to a particular religion) who leans toward a predetermined universe. This being my starting point, I simply replaced the word God with "wonder and awesomeness of the universe," the word "prayer" with "self reflection and self forgiveness" and "fait Contemplating a career change, I recently consulted a career/life coach. She recommended this book after one of our discussions. So, I'll start by saying that I'm an atheist, non-theist, agnostic (whatever you want to call someone who doesn't subscribe to a particular religion) who leans toward a predetermined universe. This being my starting point, I simply replaced the word God with "wonder and awesomeness of the universe," the word "prayer" with "self reflection and self forgiveness" and "faith" with "trust that the good guy really does win (even when he loses)." About halfway through the book, I was reminded of a conversation I had when I first realized that although I was brough up a Christian, I no longer identified as one. The conversation was inspired by a slew of "what ifs," that went something like this. What if "God" just really represents some higher level of energy, an enlightened state, a perfect equilibrium? And what if the purpose of life is to eventually reach that perfect equilibrium? And what if in order to transcend through the levels, we have to first learn a series of valuable lessons that if and only when mastered will allow us to move on? And what if we are destined to make the same mistakes over and over again, until we learn that lesson? And what if after death, our energy force is recycled either moving on or being forced to repeat the process again and again? And what if it is none of the above? According to Williamson, each failure or rather perceived failure should be seen as an opportunity. It's only then that we will see the possibilities that have always surrounded us. In that sense, the world, the universe, and/or "god" has already provided us with all the tools we need to succeed, but it's up to us to open our eyes. And while not an earthshattering revelation, it is certainly an enlightened one. In that sense, attitude is everything. How we choose to behave, to react, to act can either help us realize our full potential or guarntee we will never reach it. She talks a lot about the power of positivity and the pitfalls of negativity. She talks about love, love, and even more love. Basically, she seems to be saying that in order to be successful we need to do a few things: 1. love ourselves (warts and all) 2. love others (even the mean ones) 3. seek to fulfill your potentional by doing that which makes you happy rather than that which you think will make you rich 4. if you do #3 well, you'll never have to worry about money because the money will take care of itself 5. don't confuse money with happiness, but also don't demonize the making of it 6. money is nice only so far as it is a necessity for allowing us to reach our full potential thus enriching the world 7. be true to yourself and your gifts, find your greatness 8. and finally, take care of your physical, mental and spiritual health through good nutrition, exercise, and meditation Unlike Williamson, I don't believe in God. I'm also not sure what if any purpose the universe has for little ole me. But I do believe that life, the here the now, is the only thing that we know for certain. For this reason, I think we need to seize the moment. Find meaning and true joy in each day. I can't imagine a better way of doing that than to do what you love, that thing that excites you, the work that doesn't feel like work. I mean, imagine if we all supported ourselves doing things that made us happy? Talk about a win-win. At one point Williamson says something to the effect that we need to stop asking kids "what they want to be" and instead ask them "who they really are." I find that a rather empowering distinction. What makes you happy? What would you do even if you didn't get paid? What do you value and is what you're doing in all areas of your life honoring your values? The book is certainly inspirational in much the same way that a sappy Mitch Albom book is inspirational. I think religious undertones aside, much of what she says resonates because they are universal truths, the make-you-feel-good kind to boot. Unfortunately, the real challenge we all face is how to make these truths a reality in our lives. She makes it sound so simple. Just exude love. Just place your trust in God or the universe or the flying spaghetti monster or whatever. And that's great for the ten minutes the buzz lasts. In that sense, it's more a starting point for changing thought processes than anything else.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

    The moment I opened this book I felt like I had entered a cult. Williamson filled some blank pages flowery, unnecessary, and religious sentences, stamped a beautiful cover on it, and called it a novel. A short tweet, "Think positively and your life will be positive" is the collective sum of all the bestowed wisdom in the book. And yet, even this message is fundamentally flawed. Seeing the positive side of life and thinking positively are messages I very much agree with. But she seems to believe The moment I opened this book I felt like I had entered a cult. Williamson filled some blank pages flowery, unnecessary, and religious sentences, stamped a beautiful cover on it, and called it a novel. A short tweet, "Think positively and your life will be positive" is the collective sum of all the bestowed wisdom in the book. And yet, even this message is fundamentally flawed. Seeing the positive side of life and thinking positively are messages I very much agree with. But she seems to believe that this positive thinking should lead to an acceptance of circumstances. She even goes so far as to state that the universe is "miraculous" and will provide everything if one were merely to wait. Her evidence? Quite literally a fairy tale. I believe that positive thinking should make one realize that their lives are not defined by the circumstances they were born into. Your life is just that. Yours. You control it, it is malleable if only you possess the strength. If I had merely accepted the role fate delegated me, I would most certainly not be the man I am today. And yet, Williamson wants me to think positively, and let the universe carry out the rest? No thanks. I bought this book because the title suggested to me that it was about how opportunities unveil themselves to those who work for them. But all I found was a book promoting docility, religion, and so-called "positivity" as the answer to all of life's woes. Now you can pretend to accept what's currently wrong in your life. After all, many have it worse than you. Or you can take responsibility, fix what you don't like, and emerge stronger, better, and more confident than ever before. I prefer the latter.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Wainwright

    No magic in here—clean living, hard work, and keeping it simple are pretty much the "secret" (or "The Secret") ingredients to all success, financial and otherwise. And obviously, no spiritually-based program for living will work without both faith and action, so if you're a non-believer and/or a lazybones, this is not the book for you. No, wait—let me rephrase that: this is SO not the book for you. There are no bulleted chapter summaries, no handy a-b-c recipes for SUCCESS. You will have to ferr No magic in here—clean living, hard work, and keeping it simple are pretty much the "secret" (or "The Secret") ingredients to all success, financial and otherwise. And obviously, no spiritually-based program for living will work without both faith and action, so if you're a non-believer and/or a lazybones, this is not the book for you. No, wait—let me rephrase that: this is SO not the book for you. There are no bulleted chapter summaries, no handy a-b-c recipes for SUCCESS. You will have to ferret out exercises on your own. I say "Amen!" and pass the lemonade, but if you like things spelled out, this is N-O-T the B-O-O-K for you. Also, if you've consumed Marianne Williamson's information via other means—her books, her weekly lectures, her podcasts (or, I imagine, if you've read A Course in Miracles, from which her material derives)—there's nothing new or revelatory here. Money can be a lens, work can be a lens, but the big things we're moving toward (freedom, self-acceptance, peace) or learning to let go of (dishonesty, excuses, self-flagellation) don't change. If you're down with the idea that power doesn't come from you, but through you, this book might be a good focusing agent for dealing with your spiritual , and if you're cool with prayer, it offers many, many good, simple ones. It's slim, but nutritionally dense; while it would easily be skimmable standing up in a bookstore, I doubt that such a skim would prove worth the time of skimming. (Unlike, say, The Bridges of Madison County, which not only is skimmable standing up in a bookstore, but is only possible to "read" in that fashion. I'm sorry to say that, but I'm also sorry there are hardly any bookstores anymore, and that's not likely to change soon, either.) A small, final note of approval: the book is really beautifully designed. It is a lovely object to hold, and laid out so as to make it simple to enjoy. There is no visual clutter. There are no screaming photos, callouts, shill-like blurbs or other disruptive elements. Just words, well-organized and nicely printed. It makes me future-nostalgic for the day this kind of thing might disappear.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Yelda Basar Moers

    Marianne Williamson is a brilliant writer and thinker. I've read many of her books including A Return to Love, The Gift of Change, Illuminata, A Woman's Worth and A Year of Miracles. I am a big fan of her work and even approached A Course in Miracles, the spiritual text that she gets most of her philosophical ideas from, so inspired was I by her writing. Though in the end the Course, I found, to be not only way over my head in its dry and abstract form, written like a legal code, but unrealistic Marianne Williamson is a brilliant writer and thinker. I've read many of her books including A Return to Love, The Gift of Change, Illuminata, A Woman's Worth and A Year of Miracles. I am a big fan of her work and even approached A Course in Miracles, the spiritual text that she gets most of her philosophical ideas from, so inspired was I by her writing. Though in the end the Course, I found, to be not only way over my head in its dry and abstract form, written like a legal code, but unrealistic and almost militant. I didn't like it. But I still loved Marianne! I believe she is a brilliant writer, speaker (I've seen her speak twice!) and thinker, but I found myself struggling through this book. I am afraid someone coming to this book looking for answers to money or work issues would be disappointed. Firstly, I felt there was not a strong narrative to carry the reader through and I didn't grasp her main ideas or mission. Often I felt I was just floating through a sea of words, meandering aimlessly, with no destination in sight; it was difficult to stay engaged. The chapter names really provided the only structure, but even they were not enough. There were some suggestions on how to help with challenges in work and money, but in general I felt they were too far fetched and abstract. Ultimately, it is challenging to apply her spiritual principles to let say, getting out of bankruptcy, or having a serious problem with your work situation. In the end, I would suggest that my fellow book lovers and fans of Marianne skip this one. Maybe one day she will come out with a better version of it, or will write another book, but I wouldn't waste my time reading it. I think this is as honest as I can be about this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tim Larison

    In these difficult economic times Marianne Williamson’s new book, “The Law of Divine Compensation: On Work, Money, and Miracles” is a refreshing reminder that God’s love is the true source of our abundance. “Finance is just one of many areas where an increasingly obsolete, materially based worldview is proving to be inadequate to the challenges of the times in which we live,” Williamson writes in the preface of her book. The author’s message of God’s unconditional love trumping worldly possession In these difficult economic times Marianne Williamson’s new book, “The Law of Divine Compensation: On Work, Money, and Miracles” is a refreshing reminder that God’s love is the true source of our abundance. “Finance is just one of many areas where an increasingly obsolete, materially based worldview is proving to be inadequate to the challenges of the times in which we live,” Williamson writes in the preface of her book. The author’s message of God’s unconditional love trumping worldly possessions resonated with me. I found myself underlying passages in page after page for future reference (the most words I’ve highlighted in any book I’ve read this year). Williamson is not preaching to us from the mountain top. Similar to her writing style in other books, she is very vulnerable with her own struggles – this time in the financial realm. In “Divine Compensation” she tells a story of how she lost $10,000 early in her speaking career due to poor event planning. “Oh Daddy,” she recalls telling her father, “It was such a bomb!” Williamson describes how this personal misfortune taught her a lesson. After consoling words from her father, she relates how she chose to think about this incident was the key to transforming it to positive experience. She could either see it “as proof of utter failure and doom or as an opportunity to forgive myself and attract a miracle.” Williamson, in being open with her own shortcomings, gives the reader a sense of being counseled by a friend, rather than being lectured at by a “know it all” spiritual guru. I wasn’t expecting to read about the value of forgiveness in a book about work and money, but according to Williamson a forgiving spirit is essential in attracting our own good. “The universe knows if you were hurt and is already on the case to make right whatever wrong occurred,” she writes. “Your anger, if it lingers, throws a wrench in the machine of the miraculous universe.” In her view, “no deviation from love – on your part or anyone else’s – can keep the universe from its divine intention that your life be one of fullness and joy.” I also liked the prayers Williamson included in the book. Prayers to transform the reader’s consciousness. Can you relate to this one as I did?: “Dear God, I feel myself falling into the hole of self-pity, self-obsession, and negativity. I know I shouldn’t think this way, but I’m afraid and I cannot stop. Please replace my thoughts with Yours, dear God. I am willing to see myself and all things differently. Please send me the miracle of new eyes and ears, that I might know my greater good. Amen.” I copied this and other prayers from the book and plan refer to them often during my own times of doubt and struggle. “The Law of Divine Compensation” is the best book from Marianne Williamson I have ever read (and I have read a few, including her landmark work “Return To Love”). “You are not merely a being of the material world; you are a being of unlimited spirit,” she writes. “And in spirit there is no lack. You are not lacking, just because your circumstances are.” Williamson’s message of God’s love being our true source of fulfillment was a comfort to me, and I think it will be to you, too. I was given a complementary copy of this book for review purposes. I was not financially compensated for this post. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is an uplifting read, but the author really never addresses the concept of accepting God's will or the fact that sometimes to financially struggle is a good thing for spirituality. It leads the reader who IS turning everything over to God, with complete faith and patience, with an optimistic attitude, to feel rather guilty or spiritually inept. My personal belief is that God works in a mysterious way and sometimes financial security alludes even the most faithful. That being said, God does This is an uplifting read, but the author really never addresses the concept of accepting God's will or the fact that sometimes to financially struggle is a good thing for spirituality. It leads the reader who IS turning everything over to God, with complete faith and patience, with an optimistic attitude, to feel rather guilty or spiritually inept. My personal belief is that God works in a mysterious way and sometimes financial security alludes even the most faithful. That being said, God does watch over the faithful, and blesses them with enough for their needs. He grants the honest heart many tender mercies along the way! As a family who has been struggling to rebound from a crippling job loss nearly four years ago, I can attest to the truthfulness of many of Williamson's observations. But ultimately, we should submit to God's will for our families, whether or not His will leads to prosperity in the future. These inner-energy-heavy books are good for insight, but they often seem to leave out the concept of accepting God's will with a glad heart. No matter what.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eliza Fayle

    Marianne is a student of The Course of Miracles, so she carries the concepts from the course into this book, but focusing strictly on work and money. This does mean there is a Christian bent to the book, but if this is not what you relate to, you can simply substitute your Loving Energy word of choice. The end result is the same; partnership with something bigger than yourself. How does this partnership work? Well, the book focuses on two things: 1. Changing from a lack to an abundance mentality 2. Marianne is a student of The Course of Miracles, so she carries the concepts from the course into this book, but focusing strictly on work and money. This does mean there is a Christian bent to the book, but if this is not what you relate to, you can simply substitute your Loving Energy word of choice. The end result is the same; partnership with something bigger than yourself. How does this partnership work? Well, the book focuses on two things: 1. Changing from a lack to an abundance mentality 2. Surrendering the 'how' to a higher power Interestingly, in my personal life I have successfully transitioned to an abundance mentality and surrendering. However, my business life remains a challenge. I have days when I do not believe that I will achieve my goal of working full time for myself. Of course, those are the days that things go stagnant. As Marianne points out "If your core belief is "I lack" and you carry that belief with you, then you will subconsciously perpetuate or create the circumstances that reflect the belief." If you are jobless, thinking of changing jobs, running your own business, or thinking of running your own business, The Law of Divine Compensation is a must read. Read the full review at http://silverandgrace.com/book-review...

  11. 4 out of 5

    HRH

    I loved, loved, loved a lot of the ideas in this book. I don't normally love this genre so it's taken me a long time to get through it. But I will definitely take some of the ideas on with me. For example, she mentions lining up all the people in your life and going through them one by one and thinking about how they have been brought into your life to learn something or to teach you something or to give you an opportunity. And I've tried to think of that when I meet someone I don't like (becaus I loved, loved, loved a lot of the ideas in this book. I don't normally love this genre so it's taken me a long time to get through it. But I will definitely take some of the ideas on with me. For example, she mentions lining up all the people in your life and going through them one by one and thinking about how they have been brought into your life to learn something or to teach you something or to give you an opportunity. And I've tried to think of that when I meet someone I don't like (because you don't need interesting philosophies to endure people you do like) or someone I'm meeting only briefly. I just reflect on how interesting it is that we are being brought together and ponder on the possible reasons. Most importantly, I think about how I want to leave them: better. My criticisms would be with the genre in general. It has no plot so it's hard for it to be a page turner for me. It's just idea after idea after idea. My only other criticism would be that I rather wondered, because it was so oft quoted, why I wasn't just reading "A Course on Miracles." Perhaps because this book is geared towards money. Anyway, well-written and had good, worthwhile, helpful ideas not just about money but kind of about anything good you'd like to come into your life.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Thoma

    Recommended by a friend, this is a nice mindset shift reminder for anyone who’s self-employed, in between things, or in another related seemingly uncertain financial situation. In line with the law of attraction and lots of mention of “God,” it’s a holistic pocket book reminder of the power of our thoughts. I’ve read other books with a similar message whose presentation I preferred. However, I appreciated the fundamental ideals of harnessing the power of authentic positive thinking.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Deborah J.

    This book is a game-changer for this new season! It's a spiritual guide very recommended for the self-employed; and like no other that I've read before. I've started it again! (Something I rarely do.) This book is a game-changer for this new season! It's a spiritual guide very recommended for the self-employed; and like no other that I've read before. I've started it again! (Something I rarely do.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Les

    Less involved and specific to the topic than I anticipated, but still full of great insight and truth. Felt it was reiteration more than revelation, but could be from reading past works of this ilk. Not a waste of time, though. No small thing in this day and age.

  15. 4 out of 5

    T.E.

    A friend suggested this for me to read since this year has been really hard for me. It hit all the right notes that I needed to hear. Following the take what you need & leave the rest -moving forward into 2021 a little lighter and knowing that there is a miracle waiting to happen to me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Omar Taufik

    Another fantastic book by the inspirational author Marianne Williamson In the preface the author says " If we have a problem in any area—whether relationships, health, money, or anything else—the first place to look for a solution is in the nature of our thinking. This applies to money no more and no less than it applies to anything else." and then says " Every thought is a cause that produces an effect " And this is the key to the book's main idea or message .. where although this book addresses Another fantastic book by the inspirational author Marianne Williamson In the preface the author says " If we have a problem in any area—whether relationships, health, money, or anything else—the first place to look for a solution is in the nature of our thinking. This applies to money no more and no less than it applies to anything else." and then says " Every thought is a cause that produces an effect " And this is the key to the book's main idea or message .. where although this book addresses money & work, it does apply to all the different aspects of life Starting from the thought "the cause" , shifting to thinking " miraculously " should be the solution to the problems we face .. this positive shift changing your view your perception & realization of all experiences ... the author explains in the Preface : " In our ability to think about something differently lies the power to make it different. Miraculous thinking does not represent a state of denial, at least not in the traditional sense. It doesn’t represent the magical thinking of simply looking away from something horrible and pretending it doesn’t exist. If anything, it is a state of positive denial: looking at something and knowing that since only love is ultimately real, nothing else has ultimate effect. The miracle-worker does not look away from the illusions of the mortal world but rather looks through them, thus invoking a world that lies beyond." and says " This book is not about denying our economic problems; it’s about transcending them. It’s about realizing that illusions—no matter how entrenched they might be within the three-dimensional world—cannot stand in the presence of love. Through the authority of loving thought, we are given the power to turn any situation that is not love back into love, starting with thinking about it differently. We do this by identifying our own lovelessness and being willing to let it go. Thinking this way—which is sometimes easy, sometimes not—is the mental habit of the “miracle-minded.” With this shift in thinking, change in perception, realization of what is real in this world and existence.. we experience life and it's events differently .. open up as magnets of love and positive energy .. The author mentions this end result in her Preface of her book : " No matter what our problem, or its form or size, an infinite field of miraculous possibility awaits our open-mindedness and love" We all face issues and tough experiences in our lives and with the shock of loss and pain might tell our selves that it is the end ... according to the material world .. where this book tells you us is not the end , might as well be the beginning ! When we view the incident spirituality transcending our material world and have faith in the higher power taking care of us where the universe is actually created to work in our favor with the infinite abundance of love from the infinite source of love and care .. we will then view what happened differently from the perception of faith and love not the material perception of the ego and fear to then experience miracles with this change in perception .. The Law of Devine Compensation ! But in order to experience this .. we need to remain open to love and abundance .. open to this reality with faith in it.. Throughout the book the author explores various concepts related to the rule which help in actually experiencing it wether through their positivity or by highlighting concepts that might block this love and abundance elaborating on how to deal with them ... These chapters are full of wisdom, insights and inspiration This book can be used as an inspiration in fields​ other than work and money where I cannot deny it's positive impact on myself even through the process of reading it .. Straight five rating ! High recommendation to all ..

  17. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    I love Marianne's work, and I've read many of her books before, some of them more than once. However I had a hard time getting past the first few pages on this one. And now I know it had nothing to do with neither her writing, nor the subject. It was my own personal resistance to face this issues head on. After a personal crisis regarding work and money last year I finally picked up the book and started reading. And I mean really reading with all my attention and taking the time to digest every I love Marianne's work, and I've read many of her books before, some of them more than once. However I had a hard time getting past the first few pages on this one. And now I know it had nothing to do with neither her writing, nor the subject. It was my own personal resistance to face this issues head on. After a personal crisis regarding work and money last year I finally picked up the book and started reading. And I mean really reading with all my attention and taking the time to digest every concept she addresses here. It has really been a true eye opener! Now I understand why I made terrible choices in the past regarding money and work, and why I couldn't get out of that miserable cycle. Because it's really about something more deep and meaningful than just getting a pay check under unfavorable and/or questionable conditions, or getting by, or getting busy. And what you get in return is much more than just money. How you perceive and how you use that money is what makes a difference. The key word here is integrity. That's what the Universe responds to, not greed, not selfishness, not a lack of compassion, not a win-lose working arrangement. And when you play along with those kinds of approaches because of that nonsensical "that's how business is done"crap, you will always get the short end of the stick. You can't be a willing participant in that that kind of unfair trade and expect respect or a fair pay for your talents. And whoever is on the "winning" side can't expect the Universe to clap and cheer the abuse and exploitation of other's time and talents and reward you for it. That's why it's called Law of Compensation, the Universe eventually will compensate you one way or another when others have denied you your own good and lead you where you belong, and it will balance the score for those who have taken more from others, or even what wasn't theirs to begin with through dubious methods. There is always a choice. You can chose to do and conduct your business with integrity and in a honorable way and still prosper. What makes the difference is if through work and money you help others to empower themselves. That's what really sets you apart.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adrien

    A relatively well-kept secret among my half-atheist family is that I pray (or meditate or whatever you want to call it) all the time. I have experienced the profound transformation that comes from opening up my heart to whatever gifts the universe wants to send my way—after all, the only thing any of us can really “control” is our perspective/attitude and how we organize our behavior accordingly. That being said, I have internalized a lot of self-defeating money beliefs over the years and am in A relatively well-kept secret among my half-atheist family is that I pray (or meditate or whatever you want to call it) all the time. I have experienced the profound transformation that comes from opening up my heart to whatever gifts the universe wants to send my way—after all, the only thing any of us can really “control” is our perspective/attitude and how we organize our behavior accordingly. That being said, I have internalized a lot of self-defeating money beliefs over the years and am in a process of trying to relinquish them. This book highlighted the spiritual hurt that’s tied up in believing we don’t “deserve” money or other compensation for our work in the world, and I appreciated it for that. I recognize that this book is written from a Christian perspective, but I don’t think I’ll ever not bristle at reading male-centric language when applied to God. The notion of God being a dude doesn’t jive with my personal beliefs, though I was able to read through that. The only other qualm I have with the book is that the author doesn’t reckon with the deeply entrenched power structures that keep the wheel of exploitation turning. Certainly there is much value in opening one’s heart to the possibility of abundance and applying effort accordingly, but as a hobby sociologist I can’t help but wonder what the author would make of the massive structural inequalities that keep resources concentrated in the hands of the few? I’m not so sanguine that that problem can be solved merely by all of us “letting go and letting God,” as it were. On a final note, I chuckle at the thought of my staunchly atheist Mom reading this book and immediately throwing it in the garbage, then looking askance at me for having read it at all 😂

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rosemarie

    I love this book and I love Marianne Williamson. I've read some of her books before, including "A Woman's Worth" and "Everyday Grace", and they were wonderful as well. My intuition has always told me that what she says is right on target. But it may sound strange or odd to people and that's a shame. Her take on Spirituality, which is based on the book "A Course in Miracles", is very postive and so simple - but we humans make life so much more negative and difficult than it has to be. She talks ab I love this book and I love Marianne Williamson. I've read some of her books before, including "A Woman's Worth" and "Everyday Grace", and they were wonderful as well. My intuition has always told me that what she says is right on target. But it may sound strange or odd to people and that's a shame. Her take on Spirituality, which is based on the book "A Course in Miracles", is very postive and so simple - but we humans make life so much more negative and difficult than it has to be. She talks about "God" - but that can be any understanding of God that you might have - this is for people of all religions or no religion. I feel very strongly that God is bigger than any one religion and if you think that you can completely ignore the Spiritual aspects of your personality - you are very wrong. I am a Christian, and yet her words ring so true for me and the more I read her books, the more I incorporate her principles, ideas, and WONDERFUL prayers into my life. This book in particular came at a good time for me - and for many who are unemployed in this economy - it applies her beliefs to the workplace. I'd say this book is a MUST READ for anyone who is unhappy in their work life, as it will give you a whole new perspective on that topic.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ro Mo

    There are some beautiful mindset shifts that manifestation techniques can offer people, but this book does not include them. I loved From Tears to Triumph and looked this book up upon Williamson’s announcement of running for president. This book equivocates ignorant privilege to divine blessing: a modern-day colonization of our deepest selves. It is full of ways to deny reality and concoct dangerous traps of self-entitlement and aggrandizement that lead to delusion. She promotes the opposite of There are some beautiful mindset shifts that manifestation techniques can offer people, but this book does not include them. I loved From Tears to Triumph and looked this book up upon Williamson’s announcement of running for president. This book equivocates ignorant privilege to divine blessing: a modern-day colonization of our deepest selves. It is full of ways to deny reality and concoct dangerous traps of self-entitlement and aggrandizement that lead to delusion. She promotes the opposite of presence, acceptance, and gratitude for what one has. I was honestly horrified by sections of the book that were so ignorant of her privileges that “manifested” the money she claimed to be divine: she in no way acknowledges she is a white, conventionally attractive straight cis-woman who markets to the most vulnerable humans to make her money. Her examples were incredibly out of touch— such as her disappointment with “losing $10,000” to an event she planned poorly in one section. If she has that much money lying around and can lose it, then she does not understand the reality that the majority of people in this country face financially and in public spaces. I’m disgusted by her.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Way too easy to discount this book as pop psychology, new age religion or self-help. I do know that it and Marianne Williamson get characterized under all these labels. But the gentle wisdom here will take your doubts away unless the all-rational world calls you and answers. That world calls me and I've spent much time in it, worthy time, well-spent time, but rarely has rational thought provided answers to living deeply, with emotion, with music, with poetry, with G-d. And I'm Jewish. So no way Way too easy to discount this book as pop psychology, new age religion or self-help. I do know that it and Marianne Williamson get characterized under all these labels. But the gentle wisdom here will take your doubts away unless the all-rational world calls you and answers. That world calls me and I've spent much time in it, worthy time, well-spent time, but rarely has rational thought provided answers to living deeply, with emotion, with music, with poetry, with G-d. And I'm Jewish. So no way do I adopt the Christian allusions and connections. But no way might I dismiss them either. I was "Off the Map" physically, meaning away, truly away, in a place with virtually no Internet or television or radio when I sat in one sitting and read this book. I was moved and recommend it to you if you are open to thoughts that are not footnoted and I recommend to you the spirit in whose hold I truly think Marianne Williamson wrote this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bethany T

    I'll be honest, I skipped over certain sections of the book about everyone being in the world but not of the world. It rang to close to me about certain sections of some religions I'm no longer comfortable with. That being said, I found inspiring and relevant points for myself and that I think is useful to those of us who are searching. There were bits and pieces that rang true and I would say read the book and find what rings to true for you and leave the rest. The book was less about money the I'll be honest, I skipped over certain sections of the book about everyone being in the world but not of the world. It rang to close to me about certain sections of some religions I'm no longer comfortable with. That being said, I found inspiring and relevant points for myself and that I think is useful to those of us who are searching. There were bits and pieces that rang true and I would say read the book and find what rings to true for you and leave the rest. The book was less about money then about love and how we can not receive what we are not open to receiving. Another way to put this idea is that you can find what you're running from. The text was direct, conversational in style, easy to read and not overly long.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Danni J.

    I assumed this would be another "The Secret" type self help help book. It isn't. If anything it's a book about how to stay focus on your self worth during trying financial set backs. The prayers and chapter on meditation really helped. She also does an excellent job of helping you define or redefine your definition of wealth. She is a lifelong student and STRONG advocate for "A Course in Miracles" so if you don't know what that is or are not interested in spiritual insight coupled with your self I assumed this would be another "The Secret" type self help help book. It isn't. If anything it's a book about how to stay focus on your self worth during trying financial set backs. The prayers and chapter on meditation really helped. She also does an excellent job of helping you define or redefine your definition of wealth. She is a lifelong student and STRONG advocate for "A Course in Miracles" so if you don't know what that is or are not interested in spiritual insight coupled with your self help this book may not be for you. This is not a book to be quickly read. Each chapter will give you at least a weeks worth of deep personal contemplation.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mynde Mayfield

    Again, Marianne doesn't disappoint. This book, like Illuminata, I would like to carry around with me or keep on my nightstand, to remind myself of the beautiful peace of mind that is available at all times, through prayer & mediation. For anyone whose been challenged with fearful thoughts about where your next dollar would come from, or whether or not you'll ever find your life's work, this book is a must-read. It's short & sweet and filled with Marianne's incredible gift of prayer; of saying wh Again, Marianne doesn't disappoint. This book, like Illuminata, I would like to carry around with me or keep on my nightstand, to remind myself of the beautiful peace of mind that is available at all times, through prayer & mediation. For anyone whose been challenged with fearful thoughts about where your next dollar would come from, or whether or not you'll ever find your life's work, this book is a must-read. It's short & sweet and filled with Marianne's incredible gift of prayer; of saying what my heart & soul feels but my intellect/words struggle to grasp.

  25. 5 out of 5

    LemontreeLime

    After thinking about this for a night, I am changing my rating and review. I don't know what it is about this book, even though I get the gist of many of the points it makes, and i even agree with a few of them... but there is just something about this book that hits me wrong. I didn't enjoy it, i gritted my teeth and soldiered through it. Not the right book for me. I ended up feeling browbeaten and prayed over by it. If you dig that kind of thing, then be my guest. After thinking about this for a night, I am changing my rating and review. I don't know what it is about this book, even though I get the gist of many of the points it makes, and i even agree with a few of them... but there is just something about this book that hits me wrong. I didn't enjoy it, i gritted my teeth and soldiered through it. Not the right book for me. I ended up feeling browbeaten and prayed over by it. If you dig that kind of thing, then be my guest.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    I liked the book though I did approach it with significant skepticism. It's comments about our attitudes toward money made sense. More important were the discussions surrounding one's self image and self understanding; that each of us is a uniquely gifted child of God with a shared calling to approach relationships and work with love. Not every statement directly reflects biblical theology but there is no malice toward scripture and indeed quite a bit of reinforcement of spiritual realities. I liked the book though I did approach it with significant skepticism. It's comments about our attitudes toward money made sense. More important were the discussions surrounding one's self image and self understanding; that each of us is a uniquely gifted child of God with a shared calling to approach relationships and work with love. Not every statement directly reflects biblical theology but there is no malice toward scripture and indeed quite a bit of reinforcement of spiritual realities.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Fantastic read! This book was just what I needed at this point in my life. I have had a lot of negativity creep back into my thoughts and this make me think differently. We have a great ability to influence our day to day thoughts and opportunities in life. The book is filled with small prayers to help you meditate and change your thinking towards your life's work and how you look at money. Fantastic read! This book was just what I needed at this point in my life. I have had a lot of negativity creep back into my thoughts and this make me think differently. We have a great ability to influence our day to day thoughts and opportunities in life. The book is filled with small prayers to help you meditate and change your thinking towards your life's work and how you look at money.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Olwen

    Read this book the first time, fairly quickly, and am now returning to read sections as part of my spiritual practice. It's well-written and provided me with lots of insights around my own relationship with abundance. The book itself is quite small and slim, but densely packed. Read this book the first time, fairly quickly, and am now returning to read sections as part of my spiritual practice. It's well-written and provided me with lots of insights around my own relationship with abundance. The book itself is quite small and slim, but densely packed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    What a great book to remind you of all the ways to be open to the miracles of life around you. This also helps you develop an altered view of abundance. Love the prayers at the end of most chapters to help you become more open to all that is there for you and your life.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marita Kinney

    Awesome Work!!! This was my second time reading Marianne's work, and it won't be my last. She shared true insight that awakened me. Thank you for your gift of writing Marianne. I'm encouraged!!!! Awesome Work!!! This was my second time reading Marianne's work, and it won't be my last. She shared true insight that awakened me. Thank you for your gift of writing Marianne. I'm encouraged!!!!

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