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Close Knit Killer

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Springtime in Fort Connor, Colorado, is a breeze until a veteran con man shows up in town. Everyone—including the House of Lambspun knitters—is up in arms, and once again it’s up to Kelly Flynn to untangle the threads of a complicated crime…   Years ago Jared Rizzoli operated a Ponzi scheme that defrauded countless Fort Connor residents—including Barbara, one of the shop’s Springtime in Fort Connor, Colorado, is a breeze until a veteran con man shows up in town. Everyone—including the House of Lambspun knitters—is up in arms, and once again it’s up to Kelly Flynn to untangle the threads of a complicated crime…   Years ago Jared Rizzoli operated a Ponzi scheme that defrauded countless Fort Connor residents—including Barbara, one of the shop’s knitters. Jared went to jail for his crime, but after being released for good behavior, he’s back to ruin more lives.   When Jared is found dead in his car outside of Lambspun, Barbara becomes a prime suspect, much to the shock of the knitting community. Kelly and her friends now need to sort through a long list of fleeced suspects to pin the crime on the true killer…


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Springtime in Fort Connor, Colorado, is a breeze until a veteran con man shows up in town. Everyone—including the House of Lambspun knitters—is up in arms, and once again it’s up to Kelly Flynn to untangle the threads of a complicated crime…   Years ago Jared Rizzoli operated a Ponzi scheme that defrauded countless Fort Connor residents—including Barbara, one of the shop’s Springtime in Fort Connor, Colorado, is a breeze until a veteran con man shows up in town. Everyone—including the House of Lambspun knitters—is up in arms, and once again it’s up to Kelly Flynn to untangle the threads of a complicated crime…   Years ago Jared Rizzoli operated a Ponzi scheme that defrauded countless Fort Connor residents—including Barbara, one of the shop’s knitters. Jared went to jail for his crime, but after being released for good behavior, he’s back to ruin more lives.   When Jared is found dead in his car outside of Lambspun, Barbara becomes a prime suspect, much to the shock of the knitting community. Kelly and her friends now need to sort through a long list of fleeced suspects to pin the crime on the true killer…

30 review for Close Knit Killer

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    I'm always torn on this series. I like it somewhat but at the same time it's: A) easy to figure out the culprit at least mid-book. B) still the same cafe food and caffeine fillers to take up space (or make up a word count for editing I guess) and C) still the same "See Jane. See Dick" dialogue between some of the characters. The book jacket says the author has a degree in literature, I'm begging her to please (PLEASE) give us readers some credit as adults who can follow a written conversation in I'm always torn on this series. I like it somewhat but at the same time it's: A) easy to figure out the culprit at least mid-book. B) still the same cafe food and caffeine fillers to take up space (or make up a word count for editing I guess) and C) still the same "See Jane. See Dick" dialogue between some of the characters. The book jacket says the author has a degree in literature, I'm begging her to please (PLEASE) give us readers some credit as adults who can follow a written conversation in a book without having to know Burt is talking to (Ernie) Kelly in almost EVERY sentence of their conversations. (Really, it's starting to feel like Sesame Street at times.) This totally throws off the natural flow of the dialogue. (Though would totally work for a drinking game). I'm still asking the same question, do these people have severe memory problems making it necessary to repeat the person's name 5 times a conversation? Maggie, please read other books and compare, it would make it so much easier to get into the story without these speed bumps. Also, it's frustrating as a spinner to read "spinning yarn in her lap into yarn". Seriously? Roving, top, batt, wool, sliver, alpaca, mohair, silk, camel, yak, buffalo, FIBER, etc...they all work, but "Yarn into Yarn"? Noooooo! A simple google search could go a long way.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Ugh. I really wish this series would end. Somehow, I feel compelled to keep reading about Kelly and her 1-dimensional friends, although these books make me want to poke my eye out with a 16-inch #7 needle.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    Terrible, terrible book. The following is just a brief list of why I thought so: 1. Maggie Sefton apparently doesn't know that much about knitting. Sad, since she's written a dozen "knitting mysteries." It doesn't matter what size needle you use to knit something - it's the weight of the yarn and the number of stitches that determines the size of the finished object. Kelly doesn't want to knit a baby hat, because she could never use those "itty-bitty" needles. So what? Grab some size 15 needles, Terrible, terrible book. The following is just a brief list of why I thought so: 1. Maggie Sefton apparently doesn't know that much about knitting. Sad, since she's written a dozen "knitting mysteries." It doesn't matter what size needle you use to knit something - it's the weight of the yarn and the number of stitches that determines the size of the finished object. Kelly doesn't want to knit a baby hat, because she could never use those "itty-bitty" needles. So what? Grab some size 15 needles, bulky weight yarn and have it - you can still knit a baby hat. Besides, according to the pattern at the end of the book, the premie hat is knit with US #8 needles. Since when is that itty-bitty? Also, I'm not a spinner, but even I know that you use roving to make yarn. You don't spin yarn to make yarn. Please, if you going to base an entire series of books on a theme, please know what you're talking about. 2. What a boring, obnoxious, sanctimonious group of characters. The first half of the book was spent on all the characters congratulating each other for all the wonderful deeds they do volunteering for the community. 3. The dialogue is so unrealistic. Nobody continually repeats the name of the person they are talking to. 4. And speaking of repetition, (view spoiler)[Did you know that Barbara confronted the victim twice the day before he was killed! TWICE! No really, twice! I'm so glad that I was told that every other page. (hide spoiler)] I might have forgotten. Oh, and did you know that Kelly likes coffee? And every server in the cafe knows that Kelly likes coffee. And that she needs a refill of coffee? I will finish off the series. I like to finish things I start, but man it can be kind of painful. Writing scathing reviews helps.

  4. 5 out of 5

    MsAprilVincent

    There's no good reason for me to keep reading these, but I do. I guess by now it's turned into hate-reading, which also carried me through the last Twilight book. Kelly, the main character, annoys me with everything she does. She's nosy. She complains about calories. She speaks in expository dialogue that is clunky and inauthentic. She puts all her quirks down to being an accountant. She's been knitting 4+ years and still tells people she's awful at it. I'm at a real "look at that bitch eating c There's no good reason for me to keep reading these, but I do. I guess by now it's turned into hate-reading, which also carried me through the last Twilight book. Kelly, the main character, annoys me with everything she does. She's nosy. She complains about calories. She speaks in expository dialogue that is clunky and inauthentic. She puts all her quirks down to being an accountant. She's been knitting 4+ years and still tells people she's awful at it. I'm at a real "look at that bitch eating crackers" level of annoyance here. At any rate, the reveal was rushed, but the book could still have been 50+ pages shorter, if the author hadn't felt compelled to talk about Kelly's coffee addiction every three paragraphs. Just grumps all the way down.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I think this may be the last Maggie Sefton book I read. I have some compulsion that makes me feel like I have to read every book in a series but these books leave me more frustrated than entertained. Her pacing is odd, there is no sense of time and as a Colorado native I HATE the liberties she takes even though she lives in Colorado too. And a giant wildfire for the next book? Really...lets capitalize on the misery of others why don't we. Ugh..

  6. 4 out of 5

    April Schilling

    Another great book in the Kelly Flynn series!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Judie

    Life in Fort Connor, Colorado, gets dismal when Jared Rizzoli, a financial advisor whose Ponzi scheme wiped out the savings of many residents, causing the death of some of them, returned after serving a ten-year sentence to conduct a financial seminar and purchase some property. He is unrepentant and, since this is a murder mystery, is murdered. Suspicion quickly falls on two residents but other possibilities arise. Meanwhile, Pete Wainwright’s Grandfather Ben, who lived in Denver and cared for Life in Fort Connor, Colorado, gets dismal when Jared Rizzoli, a financial advisor whose Ponzi scheme wiped out the savings of many residents, causing the death of some of them, returned after serving a ten-year sentence to conduct a financial seminar and purchase some property. He is unrepentant and, since this is a murder mystery, is murdered. Suspicion quickly falls on two residents but other possibilities arise. Meanwhile, Pete Wainwright’s Grandfather Ben, who lived in Denver and cared for Pete’s eleven year old niece Cassie, had a major heart problem. Pete brought Cassie back to Fort Connor. Kelly Flynn, the main character, continued her work as an accountant, drunk a lot of coffee, had her home repaired, and tried to find the killer. There is a lot of information about types of wool the way it is formed from the original shearing until it becomes threads of yarn. I really wanted to like this book. I looked forward to reading it for more than a month before it was published. I’ve read other books by Maggie Sefton and enjoyed them. Therefore, I stuck with it to the end, even though I was ready to quit before I got to page 50. I should have quit. The book reminded me of the game of Telephone where the same message is repeated from one person to another. The difference was that in CLOSE KNIT KILLER the end message is identical to the original one; it is just repeated numerous times as a different character arrives on the scene. I found all the conversation to be repetitious and very boring. There should have been a limit on the number of times we read about Kelly’s love of coffee and a few other food offerings. Except for Cassie, it was difficult to differentiate the characters because most of them sounded and acted pretty much alike. And I identified the killer very quickly. I hope the next book is more developed and interesting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's disturbing to read the tenth volume in a series and find so little character development or richness of plot. We're reminded again that Kelly likes coffee, is an accountant, is afraid of her knitting (what *is* that?). She and Steve scarcely speak, which is the natural next step after moving into a new house together, but also an improvement on earlier volumes' indications that they have sex. An impossibly well-balanced preteen girl enters the mix, and years of improbably trouble-free surro It's disturbing to read the tenth volume in a series and find so little character development or richness of plot. We're reminded again that Kelly likes coffee, is an accountant, is afraid of her knitting (what *is* that?). She and Steve scarcely speak, which is the natural next step after moving into a new house together, but also an improvement on earlier volumes' indications that they have sex. An impossibly well-balanced preteen girl enters the mix, and years of improbably trouble-free surrogate parenting will likely ensue. Still no one seems to suspect that Kelly is secretly responsible for all the murders. She obviously drugged Madge to make her confess. When will Burt wake up?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Deanne

    I wish I'd like this book more. I've read every one of these knitting mysteries and feel loyal to the series, but this book was boring. All the details came out through extremely redundant dialogue. Another point of contention -- we get it, Kelly likes coffee and feels bad about eating at the diner. The mystery was interesting, but there was no character development. Actually, everyone seemed a bit robotic. I'm sticking with the series out curiosity and loyalty. Praying next summer's book is bet I wish I'd like this book more. I've read every one of these knitting mysteries and feel loyal to the series, but this book was boring. All the details came out through extremely redundant dialogue. Another point of contention -- we get it, Kelly likes coffee and feels bad about eating at the diner. The mystery was interesting, but there was no character development. Actually, everyone seemed a bit robotic. I'm sticking with the series out curiosity and loyalty. Praying next summer's book is better.

  10. 5 out of 5

    RuthG

    This was a disappointing book. There seemed to be little story and lots of time devoted to recounting previous facts and stating where Kelly was and how much coffee she was drinking. There was also a lot of emphasis on the 11 year old girl that made her sound very naive as well as younger than her years. The mystery was easy to figure out and I knew who the killer was very early on without any of the final clues. I always enjoy the descriptions of the shop and of Colorado, but those were less pr This was a disappointing book. There seemed to be little story and lots of time devoted to recounting previous facts and stating where Kelly was and how much coffee she was drinking. There was also a lot of emphasis on the 11 year old girl that made her sound very naive as well as younger than her years. The mystery was easy to figure out and I knew who the killer was very early on without any of the final clues. I always enjoy the descriptions of the shop and of Colorado, but those were less prominent in this story.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Hmmm, if you took out all the times Kelly is eating at the cafe or drinking coffee, this book would probably be five pages. And how many times did we have to hear about what an amazing girl Cassie is? Cassie this, Cassie that! Sometimes I think I read these books so I have something to get angry and complain about! I guess one good thing is that there weren't so many Ohhhhhhh yeah's in this book as usual!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Yetimomma

    I have enjoyed this series from the first one, but this one kind of fell flat for me. By the end I really got tired of all the need for coffee references.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Kelly

    I've never been particularly impressed with the writing in the Knitting Mystery series by Maggie Sefton, but the books were still enjoyable, and the mysteries engaging - until this one. All Kelly seems to do is walk back and forth from her cottage to the knitting shop for coffee, and hang out with "the gang". Halfway through the book the mystery is barely to be found, and once the murder does take place, it's still a backseat plot point compared to "character development" (if you can call it tha I've never been particularly impressed with the writing in the Knitting Mystery series by Maggie Sefton, but the books were still enjoyable, and the mysteries engaging - until this one. All Kelly seems to do is walk back and forth from her cottage to the knitting shop for coffee, and hang out with "the gang". Halfway through the book the mystery is barely to be found, and once the murder does take place, it's still a backseat plot point compared to "character development" (if you can call it that). The descriptors are repetitive, the dialogue childish. I'm sad to say, but this is yet another series that has gone on longer than the author can thoughtfully sustain.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lark of The Bookwyrm's Hoard

    Review originally published at The Bookwyrm's Hoard. For me, Maggie Sefton's Knitting Mysteries are mental popcorn. I mean that in a positive way: they're a pleasant diversion, perfect for when I need something light. They're entertaining but not demanding, filled with characters I like as well as plenty of references to one of my other favorite past-times, knitting. Close Knit Killer felt a little different than the previous ones, and I'm still trying to figure out why. I think primarily it's th Review originally published at The Bookwyrm's Hoard. For me, Maggie Sefton's Knitting Mysteries are mental popcorn. I mean that in a positive way: they're a pleasant diversion, perfect for when I need something light. They're entertaining but not demanding, filled with characters I like as well as plenty of references to one of my other favorite past-times, knitting. Close Knit Killer felt a little different than the previous ones, and I'm still trying to figure out why. I think primarily it's that Kelly doesn't really do much detecting in this book. She's certainly keeping tabs on the police investigation, and she's definitely concerned when several of the main suspects are acquaintances whom she likes. But unlike in the earlier books, Kelly doesn't actually do any snooping around or trying to find clues on her own in this one -- which is most unlike her. She doesn't really solve the crime; the solution is practically handed to her on a platter. To be fair, her behavior here is a lot more realistic than in the other books. Cops don't generally appreciated amateurs poking around and potentially interfering with their own investigations. But in a cozy mystery, I normally expect at least some sleuthing by the amateur sleuth! The mystery itself was also a little disappointing, because it wasn't that hard to figure out despite the proliferation of on-the-scene suspects. I picked up on the murderer pretty early on, though I couldn't be certain for a while, since there were no specific clues pointing in that direction until the last quarter of the book. Kelly's unusual investigative restraint didn't keep me from enjoying Close Knit Killer. As usual, there is a subplot involving Kelly's friends. After cafe owner Pete's grandfather is taken ill, Pete and his girlfriend Jennifer find themselves in loco parentis to Pete's tween niece, Cassie. The friends all jump in to help provide supervised summer activities for Cassie, since Pete and Jennifer both work long hours. Cassie is a sweetheart, although she's almost too good; I kept wondering when we would see something other than perfect behavior from her. Maybe that will come in a future book. Kelly's circle of friends is one of the things I like best about this series. They're all nice people, and they clearly care about and support each other. Sefton relies a little too much on giving each character a few identifying characteristics, and there's not a lot of character development in each book, but over the course of the series, most of the regular characters have been fleshed out enough to avoid being two-dimensional. I was also glad to see that Kelly and Steve's relationship is back on an even keel; their breakup a few books ago almost made me quit reading the series. Unfortunately, Steve doesn't put in many appearances in Close Knit Killer, because he's working down in Denver. Another thing I really like about this series is the setting. Sefton's "Fort Connor" is a thinly-disguised Fort Collins, Colorado, and the yarn shop around which the series revolves is based on a real shop. (I keep promising myself that I'll get there someday.) The shop, with its adjacent cafe, is almost a character in the series, and the overall setting -- a small city situated right against the mountains -- gives plenty of scope for variety. Close Knit Killer occurs mostly in and around the Lambspun shop, but previous mysteries have taken place elsewhere in the city and up in the ranches and canyons, which adds variety to the series. Close Knit Killer isn't the strongest entry in the Knitting Mysteries series, but I think fans will enjoy it anyway. If you love cozy mysteries and haven't tried this series yet, I recommend starting with the first book, Knit One Kill Two.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    Con Man and Hurt People Rizzoli has returned to Ft Connor and people are up in arms over this man returning and seeming to take up where he left off. He conned good people out of their money with a Ponzi scheme. One man lost all he had and became an alcoholic living on the trail near the golf course, another man lost everything and killed himself, leaving his wife and daughter to rebuild their lives, alone. The next man, lost his mother to cancer when her life savings were depleted and she was l Con Man and Hurt People Rizzoli has returned to Ft Connor and people are up in arms over this man returning and seeming to take up where he left off. He conned good people out of their money with a Ponzi scheme. One man lost all he had and became an alcoholic living on the trail near the golf course, another man lost everything and killed himself, leaving his wife and daughter to rebuild their lives, alone. The next man, lost his mother to cancer when her life savings were depleted and she was left with nothing.    Barbara, a friend of Kelly and her friends, confronts Rizzoli at the Lambspun and has a heated exchange with him. Then goes and confronts him again at the seminar he was giving, having to be escorted out.    Malcolm, the recovering alcoholic, also confronts Rizzoli at the Lambspun. He is shoved to the ground by Rizzoli and called names.    Nelson, who lost his mother, confronts Rizzoli the night that Rizzoli is murdered.    Kelly and her friends have a hard time accepting that any of these people would kill Rizzoli, but she is determined to figure out who had murdered Rizzoli.    The ending of this book leads directly into Book 12 "Yarn Over Murder," as it follows the forest fire that happened in Colorado the year that Book 11 was being written.    Cassie becomes a new character in the series and lives are changing. The friends are all moved into homes that Kelly's boyfriend had built, but was unable to sell. They all live close to each other and continue to help each other and provide support when it is needed.    Pete's grandfather has a heart attack and Pete has to go and take care of him and his niece, Cassie. When it is found that Cassie's mother is unwilling to return to care for her daughter, Pete brings her back to Ft. Connor, where the "gang" help her settle into life and help her get involved in many things.    These are books that I enjoy reading and re-reading. They have a recipe and a pattern in the back of the book and can be read out of order (with the exception of 11 and 12). They give enough back detail that you can skip around.     

  16. 5 out of 5

    LORI (Dollycas) CASWELL

    Mimi and Burt are having the storage building behind Lambspun remodeled for more classroom space and to organize the storage of wool waiting to be spun or sold. Pete 19s grandfather, Ben, has a heart attack and needs major surgery. Pete rushes to Denver to be at his side and make arrangements for his niece, Cassie, who has been staying with Ben while her mother travels around chasing her boyfriend 19s band. After much thought and encouragement from the folks in Fort Connor Pete realizes bringing Mimi and Burt are having the storage building behind Lambspun remodeled for more classroom space and to organize the storage of wool waiting to be spun or sold. Pete 19s grandfather, Ben, has a heart attack and needs major surgery. Pete rushes to Denver to be at his side and make arrangements for his niece, Cassie, who has been staying with Ben while her mother travels around chasing her boyfriend 19s band. After much thought and encouragement from the folks in Fort Connor Pete realizes bringing her home with him is the best option. Plus Jared Rizzol has had the nerve to return to town after being released from prison. His Ponzi scheme defrauded countless Fort Connor residents and brought much pain and suffering to their families. It is no surprise that he has been found murdered. There should be plenty of suspects but the cops quickly turn their focus to someone who Kelly knows just couldn 19t have done it. She is bound and determined to knit together the clues and find the real killer. Dollycas 19s Thoughts Holy Cliffhanger!! I love my trips to Fort Connor. The characters all feel like old friends. I would love to sit at the table in Lambspun and knit, talk and relax with a cup of coffee. Not much time for that this visit with a murder happening right in the parking lot. While I love all the regular characters, it was the new character Cassie that stole my heart. Basically left behind with her grandfather so her mother could pursue HER dreams. Then her grandfather has a heart attack and she is uprooted to Fort Connor and she handles it wonderfully. She is thrilled to go to a youth softball clinic with Kelly, to play tennis with Megan and even to stock the shelves for Mimi. Everyone comes up with ideas to keep her occupied while Jennifer and Pete work. You can tell she led a slower life with her grandfather and now she is ready expand her horizons. I enjoyed the mystery but there was a small number of actual suspects and at times Kelly and Burt seemed to be going in circles. I am really looking forward to the next installment as a canyon fire takes center stage. I don 19t know if I can wait a year to find out what happens!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fred

    Close Knit Killer is the 11th book in the A Knitting Mystery series. First off, their is an exciting new character in the Kelly Flynn series. Her name is Cassie and she is almost 12 and is the niece of Pete, the owner of Pete Porch Cafe at the House of Lambspun. The gang at Lambspun have all joined together to help out Pete and Jennifer keep Cassie occupied and to smooth out the rough edges of her moving to a new home. She seems to have adapted to her new home. I certainly hope to read more about Close Knit Killer is the 11th book in the A Knitting Mystery series. First off, their is an exciting new character in the Kelly Flynn series. Her name is Cassie and she is almost 12 and is the niece of Pete, the owner of Pete Porch Cafe at the House of Lambspun. The gang at Lambspun have all joined together to help out Pete and Jennifer keep Cassie occupied and to smooth out the rough edges of her moving to a new home. She seems to have adapted to her new home. I certainly hope to read more about her. Mimi and Burt have decided to renovate a storage building and turn in into classrooms for the spinners and weavers who frequent the House of Lambspun. When, Hal Nelson who will be doing the work, shows up with his helper, Malcolm, Kelly recognizes Malcolm as the homeless person who provided her with some valuable information solve a previous case. Then when Jared Rizzoli shows, things really begin to tense. Rizzoli had operated a Ponzi scheme and many of the residents of Fort Connor had lost money in the scheme, some, even had been ruined by it. Soon Jared is found dead in the drive of Lambspun. Barbara, a knitter that is frequently at Lambspun, Hal and Malcomb were all seen having an argument with Jared, in addition Hal and Malcomb were seen by his car shortly before he was found dead. All three had had their lives saddly touched by Jared Ponzi scheme. Kelly and Bert have their hands full sorting out people's alibis and trying to find hard facts that will point to the murderer. Sefton wonderfully ends up the story by setting up the next book. I wouldn't even be surprised if there isn't another romance blooming in the next book. Another exciting chapter in Kelly Flynn's life. Looking forward to book 12 next year.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    First reading - 2 stars: I'm being generous. There was barely any detectoring in this one and it seemed to focus on Pete's niece who is 12. Seriously, wtf?! It picked up in the last couple of pages so I will read the next one. When it is released. Next June. Sigh. 21/1/15: I'm going to rant a little here: I mentioned my main problem with these books in another review but the problem remains: the author has not done the necessary amount of research in the field of spinning. Batten is not a term use First reading - 2 stars: I'm being generous. There was barely any detectoring in this one and it seemed to focus on Pete's niece who is 12. Seriously, wtf?! It picked up in the last couple of pages so I will read the next one. When it is released. Next June. Sigh. 21/1/15: I'm going to rant a little here: I mentioned my main problem with these books in another review but the problem remains: the author has not done the necessary amount of research in the field of spinning. Batten is not a term used for fibre. A batten is a stick or bar, thus "batten down the hatches". Considering the insane number of times Sefton repeats points such as Kelly's love of coffee and that she's an accountant, it's such a shame the author did not replace those overused phrases with some real, researched information on what we spinners actually do, and even just provide a better idea of how spun fibre goes onto a bobbin on the wheel, not around the wheel itself. It's not as though this information is hard to find or kept a secret - we love to talk about spinning! /endrant 1/2/15: this is definitely the worst book of the series. I down-graded it to 1 star. In addition to the continued errors when discussing spinning and repetition of unnecessary detail, the author also left in a number of inconsistencies that really should have been caught prior to publication. One of these was the change of one of the character's surnames from Schmidt to Smith. The whole thing was just lazily written and poorly edited. If it didn't lead on to the next book so quickly I would have definitely avoided rereading it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pdamon

    Some might like this better than I, but I found it very chatty. Lots of repetitious small talk, very little plot. By page 64, I knew who was going to be the murder victim, who would be wrongly suspected of the crime, had two candidates for the murderer, knew the motive. No surprise ending. However, there is a sudden development right at the end of the book that introduces the next book. Some authors include a "read the first few pages of my next novel" at the back of the book. In is case, it was Some might like this better than I, but I found it very chatty. Lots of repetitious small talk, very little plot. By page 64, I knew who was going to be the murder victim, who would be wrongly suspected of the crime, had two candidates for the murderer, knew the motive. No surprise ending. However, there is a sudden development right at the end of the book that introduces the next book. Some authors include a "read the first few pages of my next novel" at the back of the book. In is case, it was added right into the current novel. Also, the author needs to have someone explain yarn swifts, ball winders, and how they function to her. (There is a knitting pattern at the end of the book for something not knit in the book and recipes for things not eaten. Odd.)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Reggie Billingsworth

    If I could give this a negative star, I would. Poorly written, "Close Knit Killer" offers a two step plot with inaccurate needle work terminology. It sports no research, mind-numbing dialogue and a totally absent editorship, which leaves just about all the coffee swilling single dimension characters with the dreck they deserve. Another reviewer has admitted reading this promotes self-injury with a #7 [US?] needle. I would only add, "and/or a 4.5mm". What a gawdelpus writer this Maggie Sefton is. Is If I could give this a negative star, I would. Poorly written, "Close Knit Killer" offers a two step plot with inaccurate needle work terminology. It sports no research, mind-numbing dialogue and a totally absent editorship, which leaves just about all the coffee swilling single dimension characters with the dreck they deserve. Another reviewer has admitted reading this promotes self-injury with a #7 [US?] needle. I would only add, "and/or a 4.5mm". What a gawdelpus writer this Maggie Sefton is. Is she somebody's sister/wife/aunt/mother who has the publisher by ransom? Surely someone somewhere can make this series stop. It's pitiful.

  21. 5 out of 5

    cj

    Disappointing. The mystery was okay, but the story was missing character interaction, a lot of telling and not a lot of showing. As someone else mentioned, there was alot of Kelly going back and forth from her office to the cafe. Also, it was a little preachy at times (or maybe the regular characters were a little too good to be believed?).

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adele Marano

    As a spinner, I was annoyed at some things. For instance, if it was fleeces Madge was having Mimi take to Estes Park, she and Barb did not stay up late to spin them. Once spun, the wool is no longer fleece, it is yarn. Except for those things, I enjoyed the book, as I have all the others in the series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Dumb , coffee , dumb .......

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ami

    Another dull mystery that I had solved before the end with the same flat characters having the same achingly sweet & cloying unrealistic repetitive dialogue. Who talks like that? It's all just too much. And what tween that's had her whole world turned upside down and ripped apart would act as if she was on vacation without a care in the world, not discussing it even once while staying upbeat and positive ALL THE TIME? Certainly, none that I know. Kids are resilient, but there should have been at Another dull mystery that I had solved before the end with the same flat characters having the same achingly sweet & cloying unrealistic repetitive dialogue. Who talks like that? It's all just too much. And what tween that's had her whole world turned upside down and ripped apart would act as if she was on vacation without a care in the world, not discussing it even once while staying upbeat and positive ALL THE TIME? Certainly, none that I know. Kids are resilient, but there should have been at least one breakdown for that poor kid. I'm about done with this series. If I can skip several pages at a time, and still understand what's going on while people discuss way too much freaking coffee or use the wrong knitting/spinning terms, it's embarrassing and sad. I'm always on the lookout for fluff to read when I want to escape, but this is not it. Kelly and her friends are too annoying because they're trying too hard to just BE. This one wasn't even worth it for the recipes or knitting pattern! It's too bad because I love knitting and the puns for the titles are cute and quirky.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Toney

    I must be an optimistic person. I must have depths of optimism in my bones that I am not always aware of, because even after the complete disappointment that was the last one of these I read, I still picked this up when it came my way. Maybe I'll have learned my lesson this time? Once again, the characters are flat, the mystery dull, and the plot a series of stilted conversations where the same characters go over the same information over and over again. And the knitting, a unifying theme for this I must be an optimistic person. I must have depths of optimism in my bones that I am not always aware of, because even after the complete disappointment that was the last one of these I read, I still picked this up when it came my way. Maybe I'll have learned my lesson this time? Once again, the characters are flat, the mystery dull, and the plot a series of stilted conversations where the same characters go over the same information over and over again. And the knitting, a unifying theme for this series, is hardly mentioned, and in no way important to the plot, or character development. We shall have to see if that particular optimism rears its head again, but maybe this time my experience will guide me better.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mollie

    So, so, so much coffee. Yes, the main character can't survive without it, but the description every time she takes a drink gets old. Also, characters started wagging the heads around chapter 19. And continued wagging their heads at every opportunity. Weird. The main story didn't advance much. A lot of time was spent with people taking the tween girl to activities. Also, Kelly was oddly proprietary/bossy about the old building that was getting updated. And it was pretty clear who the murderer was So, so, so much coffee. Yes, the main character can't survive without it, but the description every time she takes a drink gets old. Also, characters started wagging the heads around chapter 19. And continued wagging their heads at every opportunity. Weird. The main story didn't advance much. A lot of time was spent with people taking the tween girl to activities. Also, Kelly was oddly proprietary/bossy about the old building that was getting updated. And it was pretty clear who the murderer was, but the story kept muddling along.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This was the eleventh book of a fun cozy mystery series. I found it to be well written for its genre with well developed characters. I love the "family" that the protagonist has found because of the Lambspun fiber shop with classes and needed items for spinning, knitting, crocheting, felting, and weaving. And I love the protagonist Kelly and her CPA brain that loves to puzzle out numbers and murders. I am such a huge fan of this series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This one isn't my favorite. I felt it was too predictable, and the emphasis on getting a good lawyer to help a murderer get lessened charges was far too pronounced, even if the person was someone they knew - albeit not well. I feel like there was less sleuthing in this one, and more extra drama. I personally like a good balance between the sleuthing and the characters' personal lives. This book just didn't live up to the rest of the series.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marie Stein

    Slow-paced small town cozy - murder doesn’t happen until 1/3 of the way through the book, and offstage. This book is the third in a series of hometown Colorado characters who enjoy their community, and whose lives are spent mostly talking about knitting, spreadsheets and how adorable kids are. One full page was dedicated to a description of the weather! A pleasant read, if you like that sort of thing.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Deb Sharp

    Lots of excitement in this book! I love all the characters in this series, everyone gets along so well together I feel like I could just hangout at lambspun and Pete's Cafe and I would feel right at home. The whole way through the book I actually suspected the person that turned out to be the murderer, I think I've hung out with Kelly one to many times!

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