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The third in the Modern Library's series of original compilations, The Raven and the Monkey's Paw is a collection of classic tales and poems to engage our fear-seeking senses. The beauty of these stories and poems lies in their readability: ideal for sharing aloud around the campfire or for a quick, thrilling dip . . . under the covers with a flashlight. The writing itself The third in the Modern Library's series of original compilations, The Raven and the Monkey's Paw is a collection of classic tales and poems to engage our fear-seeking senses. The beauty of these stories and poems lies in their readability: ideal for sharing aloud around the campfire or for a quick, thrilling dip . . . under the covers with a flashlight. The writing itself sends as many awe-inspired shivers down the spine as do the ghosts and goblins on these pages. Edgar Allan Poe, the master of the horror story and the chiming lyric poem, opens the volume with his best-loved stories: "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Black Cat," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum," "The Premature Burial," "The Tell-Tale Heart," "Berenice," and "Ligeia." Every bit as chilling now as on the day they were written, these tales retain their power to stir the reader again and again. Poe, who was as well known for his poems as for his stories, is also represented by such verse standards as "The Raven," "Lenore," "To Helen," "Ulalume," and "Annabel Lee," among others. Numerous other practitioners of the supernatural story are included: Edith Wharton, with her gripping "Afterward"; Charles Dickens and his famed ghost story "The Signalman"; W. W. Jacobs, with this compilation's inspiration, "The Monkey's Paw." Also here are Saki's engrossing "Sredni Vashtar"; O. Henry's story of love lost and hopes dashed, "The Furnished Room"; Wilkie Collins's lively "A Terribly Strange Bed"; and "The Boarded Window," Ambrose Bierce's tale of the bizarre. A year-round collection for reading aloud--and frightening your friends--The Raven and the Monkey's Paw will gratify all manner of thrill-seekers. The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern Library has been a staple of the American book trade, providing readers with affordable hardbound editions of important works of literature and thought. For the Modern Library's seventy-fifth anniversary, Random House redesigned the series, restoring as its emblem the running torchbearer created by Lucian Bernhard in 1925 and refurbishing jackets, bindings, and type, as well as inaugurating a new program of selecting titles. The Modern Library continues to provide the world's best books, at the best prices.


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The third in the Modern Library's series of original compilations, The Raven and the Monkey's Paw is a collection of classic tales and poems to engage our fear-seeking senses. The beauty of these stories and poems lies in their readability: ideal for sharing aloud around the campfire or for a quick, thrilling dip . . . under the covers with a flashlight. The writing itself The third in the Modern Library's series of original compilations, The Raven and the Monkey's Paw is a collection of classic tales and poems to engage our fear-seeking senses. The beauty of these stories and poems lies in their readability: ideal for sharing aloud around the campfire or for a quick, thrilling dip . . . under the covers with a flashlight. The writing itself sends as many awe-inspired shivers down the spine as do the ghosts and goblins on these pages. Edgar Allan Poe, the master of the horror story and the chiming lyric poem, opens the volume with his best-loved stories: "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Black Cat," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum," "The Premature Burial," "The Tell-Tale Heart," "Berenice," and "Ligeia." Every bit as chilling now as on the day they were written, these tales retain their power to stir the reader again and again. Poe, who was as well known for his poems as for his stories, is also represented by such verse standards as "The Raven," "Lenore," "To Helen," "Ulalume," and "Annabel Lee," among others. Numerous other practitioners of the supernatural story are included: Edith Wharton, with her gripping "Afterward"; Charles Dickens and his famed ghost story "The Signalman"; W. W. Jacobs, with this compilation's inspiration, "The Monkey's Paw." Also here are Saki's engrossing "Sredni Vashtar"; O. Henry's story of love lost and hopes dashed, "The Furnished Room"; Wilkie Collins's lively "A Terribly Strange Bed"; and "The Boarded Window," Ambrose Bierce's tale of the bizarre. A year-round collection for reading aloud--and frightening your friends--The Raven and the Monkey's Paw will gratify all manner of thrill-seekers. The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern Library has been a staple of the American book trade, providing readers with affordable hardbound editions of important works of literature and thought. For the Modern Library's seventy-fifth anniversary, Random House redesigned the series, restoring as its emblem the running torchbearer created by Lucian Bernhard in 1925 and refurbishing jackets, bindings, and type, as well as inaugurating a new program of selecting titles. The Modern Library continues to provide the world's best books, at the best prices.

30 review for The Raven and The Monkey's Paw: Classics of Horror & Suspense

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aria

    What to say? It's a collection. Some stories are better than others. Aside from the obvious fabulousness of Poe, the best tale was a short 4 page story entitled Sredni Vashtar, by an author called Saki. I'm sorry to say that until now I had no idea who Saki was. Apparently, I've been missing out. What to say? It's a collection. Some stories are better than others. Aside from the obvious fabulousness of Poe, the best tale was a short 4 page story entitled Sredni Vashtar, by an author called Saki. I'm sorry to say that until now I had no idea who Saki was. Apparently, I've been missing out.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    I purchased this book in 2001 and hadn't made time to read in until late 2016. Two thirds of the contents come from Edgar Allen Poe, and --although no classic suspense anthology would be complete without Poe--I confess I slogged through some of his short stories included here. After awhile, the prose just gets too turgid, heavy-handed, and melodramatic (even for Poe). Of course, it was great to revisit "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum," I purchased this book in 2001 and hadn't made time to read in until late 2016. Two thirds of the contents come from Edgar Allen Poe, and --although no classic suspense anthology would be complete without Poe--I confess I slogged through some of his short stories included here. After awhile, the prose just gets too turgid, heavy-handed, and melodramatic (even for Poe). Of course, it was great to revisit "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum," and "The Tell-Tale Heart." But I'd have happily skipped the others. For me, the surprise highlight of this anthology was Edith Wharton's "Afterward" a short story of understated creepiness and an ending I couldn't have foreseen. This story is the best in the entire collection. The last third of the book definitely contains the best stories. Give the whole anthology a whirl, even if it's not Halloween season.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    The stars are for contents and curation, not for the stories themselves, which are classics. I am flummoxed by the organization and curation of this anthology. Fully half of the book are Edgar Allan Poe's greatest hits, as well as some of his poetry. I think most people who would pick up this book are already familiar with Poe and would have already read these stories (as I had). The inclusion of Wharton's wonderful Afterward was inspired (another story I'd already read) and of course the Monkey The stars are for contents and curation, not for the stories themselves, which are classics. I am flummoxed by the organization and curation of this anthology. Fully half of the book are Edgar Allan Poe's greatest hits, as well as some of his poetry. I think most people who would pick up this book are already familiar with Poe and would have already read these stories (as I had). The inclusion of Wharton's wonderful Afterward was inspired (another story I'd already read) and of course the Monkey's Paw is a classic. But O Henry's Furnished Room was cringeworthy and not horror or suspense. Anyway, the number of Poe stories and the inclusion of the poems, which were also not horror or suspenseful but were instead paeans to his dead child-bride, makes this anthology feel like a phone-it-in production.

  4. 4 out of 5

    vina✨

    I got this book solely to read The Tell-Tale Heart at first (because the rest of the copies were borrowed and i found this) but i decided to read some of the other short stories and poems too. To be honest, I didn't really like a lot of them but these are the stories/poems i enjoyed: - The Black Cat - The Tell-Tale Heart - Annabel Lee - Sredni Vashtar - The Monkey's Paw Overall, worth the read. I got this book solely to read The Tell-Tale Heart at first (because the rest of the copies were borrowed and i found this) but i decided to read some of the other short stories and poems too. To be honest, I didn't really like a lot of them but these are the stories/poems i enjoyed: - The Black Cat - The Tell-Tale Heart - Annabel Lee - Sredni Vashtar - The Monkey's Paw Overall, worth the read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leah Menegay

    The Tale of Eight Authors "The Raven and the Monkey's Paw" is a collection of horror and suspense stories from eight different authors, whose writing changed horror. This book was published in 1998 by The Modern Library in New York, it includes short stories and poems from authors like Edgar Allen Poe, Edith Wharton, Saki, Charles Dickens, O. Henry, Wilkie Collins, Ambrose Bierce, and W. W. Jacobs. Some of the most famous stories and poems that continue to catch the reader's attention include Th The Tale of Eight Authors "The Raven and the Monkey's Paw" is a collection of horror and suspense stories from eight different authors, whose writing changed horror. This book was published in 1998 by The Modern Library in New York, it includes short stories and poems from authors like Edgar Allen Poe, Edith Wharton, Saki, Charles Dickens, O. Henry, Wilkie Collins, Ambrose Bierce, and W. W. Jacobs. Some of the most famous stories and poems that continue to catch the reader's attention include The "Tell-Tale Heart," "The Raven," "Annabel Lee," and "The Monkey's Paw". Those four horrifying tales create a suspenseful novel and imaginative read. The stories by Edgar Allen Poe in this novel give an in-depth look at Edgar Allen Poe's mind and his unique writing style. "Annabel Lee" tells of a love story between a man and his Annabel Lee who was taken from him too soon in a kingdom by the sea. "The Raven", a poem that recounts a man grieving the lost love of his Lenore, as he mourns he is greeted by a knock on the door only to find a lone bird, a raven. The man speaks to the raven but is soon enraged at the raven but the bird sits upon the bust of Pallas Athena. Another famous tale from Poe included in the collection is "The Tell-Tale Heart", a story able to scare anyone. It speaks of a man trying to defend his sanity after confessing to killing another man for fear of his pale blue eye. The man would often watch the blue-eyed man sleep and after a week of observing he decides to kill the man. On the eighth night, it was time to strike, worried that the neighbors might hear the old mans night terrors he kills the man and leaves the dismembered old man scattered under the floorboards and as the hour four approaches the police come to check and are invited inside the house, the murderous man is soon given up as the pounding of the old man's heart begins again and leaves a man caught at the crime scene. "The Monkey's Paw" is another horrifying story told by W. W. Jacobs, it is a great story that can easily be compared to many of Poe's work. The story tells of the White family who is visited by Sergeant-Major Morris who tells of a magical monkey paw. It is said to grant three people three wishes, two men have already used up their wishes including Sergeant Morris, Mr. White is quick to take the paw, after the sergeant leaves the family joke about the wishes they could make. They make a wish for the two hundred pounds they need for the house and in the morning their wish is granted but not in the way they expected, their son was killed at work and the company plans to pay the Whites two hundred pounds. Grief-stricken Mrs. White forces her husband to wish their son back to life and when they look outside after a knock at the door they are shocked to see an empty street. All of the stories in this collection are shocking and truly horrific in the best way possible. As an avid reader I believe this book is a great collection of stories and poems, they show a wide range of authors and showcase different styles of horror, "The Raven and The Monkey’s Paw" offers a spectacular view of classic horror stories. The book is a wonderful collection of stories that I would recommend to anyone who loves a good scare. “Just as the bizarre characters in Poe’s stories have captured the public imagination, so too has Poe himself. He is often seen as a morbid, mysterious figure lurking in the shadows of moonlit cemeteries or crumbling castles” (The Poe Museum). Edgar Allen Poe and the many authors of "The Raven and the Monkey’s Paw" all defined horror and created timeless stories that will be read for years to come. Works Cited Poe, Edgar Allen, et al. The Raven and the Monkey’s Paw : Classics of Horror and Suspense from the Modern Library. New York, Modern Library, 1998. The Poe Museum. “Poe’s Biography | Edgar Allan Poe Museum.” Poemuseum.org, 2019, https://www.poemuseum.org/poes-biography

  6. 5 out of 5

    Faye

    I envy all writers, but especially writers from pre-1900. They were the "first," so to speak, in many genres and just know what words to use. Sadly, too many of these words are forgotten to readers and writers of today. Another good fun read for this time of year by some serious masters of the craft! I envy all writers, but especially writers from pre-1900. They were the "first," so to speak, in many genres and just know what words to use. Sadly, too many of these words are forgotten to readers and writers of today. Another good fun read for this time of year by some serious masters of the craft!

  7. 4 out of 5

    C.S.

    It's Edgar Allan Poe, what is there to write, other than: he gets better as you age. I don't think I enjoyed him as much as I have this second time around. The first time I read him I was a high school sophomore. Eleven years later, I can assure you that you will enjoy him more, probably because you understand the language and nuances better. The additional short stories are fun to read as well. It's Edgar Allan Poe, what is there to write, other than: he gets better as you age. I don't think I enjoyed him as much as I have this second time around. The first time I read him I was a high school sophomore. Eleven years later, I can assure you that you will enjoy him more, probably because you understand the language and nuances better. The additional short stories are fun to read as well.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Meiwilli

    The Monkey's Paw: Excellent. All the elements a good suspenseful, horror story should have! I've read The Monkey's Paw several times and I still love it. What's not to love? The story shows the human condition and just how desperate we all are to hang on to the people we love and life as we know it. The Raven: Poe's creepy love poetry keeps the mind busy! The Monkey's Paw: Excellent. All the elements a good suspenseful, horror story should have! I've read The Monkey's Paw several times and I still love it. What's not to love? The story shows the human condition and just how desperate we all are to hang on to the people we love and life as we know it. The Raven: Poe's creepy love poetry keeps the mind busy!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Isaiah Vargas

    This book has many different stories that have good atmostphere and keep you on the edge of your seat the while way through. Many classic authors wrote the stories in this book, and they do a good job of keeping you entertained.

  10. 5 out of 5

    January

    I can't really rate this book accurately because I didn't read all the stories in it. I read a few of Poe's stories and poems and a few other stories that weren't Poe. I enjoyed a few of the stories, hated a few of the stories and didn't understand a few of them. I can't really rate this book accurately because I didn't read all the stories in it. I read a few of Poe's stories and poems and a few other stories that weren't Poe. I enjoyed a few of the stories, hated a few of the stories and didn't understand a few of them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sydney Cleary

    A good collection of classic horror tales to read. Don't read if you don't like older English or having to wade through some text to get to the good parts of the story. A good collection of classic horror tales to read. Don't read if you don't like older English or having to wade through some text to get to the good parts of the story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    The Dark Krystal

    I've always been a lover of scary tales. Especially the old ones before electricity. The times when people had reason to be afraid of the dark. I've always been a lover of scary tales. Especially the old ones before electricity. The times when people had reason to be afraid of the dark.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rodger

    Shivverrrrr - Wilkie Collins was the best!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Deleon

    Will read again for Halloween! The stories and poem's still give me chills and fear of the dark as in my youth! A fan of dark tales. Will read again for Halloween! The stories and poem's still give me chills and fear of the dark as in my youth! A fan of dark tales.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matt Baker

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rootabega8

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vickie Weisser

  19. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  20. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Jackson

  21. 4 out of 5

    nina

  22. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

  23. 4 out of 5

    Baltimoregal

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  26. 4 out of 5

    CheZhirCat

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ali

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kris

  30. 5 out of 5

    Diane

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