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Men in Green Faces: A Novel of U.S. Navy SEALs

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"Full of ambushes and firefights…From page one I knew I wanted to be a SEAL. The more I read, the more I wanted to see if I could measure up." —Mark Owen, #1 New York Times bestselling author of No Easy Day Because it's a novel, the truth can be told. Because it's the truth, you'll never forget it... Gene Wentz's Men in Green Faces is the classic novel of Vietnam that inspir "Full of ambushes and firefights…From page one I knew I wanted to be a SEAL. The more I read, the more I wanted to see if I could measure up." —Mark Owen, #1 New York Times bestselling author of No Easy Day Because it's a novel, the truth can be told. Because it's the truth, you'll never forget it... Gene Wentz's Men in Green Faces is the classic novel of Vietnam that inspired a generation of SEALs. Here is the story of a good soldier trained to be part of an elite team of warriors—and of the killing grounds where he was forever changed. WITH A NEW FOREWORD BY THE AUTHOR Gene Michaels carries an M-60, eight hundred rounds, and a Bible. The ultimate SEAL, he also carries a murderous grudge against a bloodthirsty colonel who was once one of their own. To bring him in, Michaels and his men will go behind the lines, where they'll take on 5,000 NVA in the fight of their lives. In this stunning novel, former SEAL Gene Wentz brings to life what it was like to be a SEAL in Vietnam, running an endless tour of top-secret, death-defying operations deep in enemy territory. From the camaraderie to the harrowing recons, from brutal interrogations to incredible, toe-to-toe firefights, here are America's most feared warriors as you've never seen them before.


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"Full of ambushes and firefights…From page one I knew I wanted to be a SEAL. The more I read, the more I wanted to see if I could measure up." —Mark Owen, #1 New York Times bestselling author of No Easy Day Because it's a novel, the truth can be told. Because it's the truth, you'll never forget it... Gene Wentz's Men in Green Faces is the classic novel of Vietnam that inspir "Full of ambushes and firefights…From page one I knew I wanted to be a SEAL. The more I read, the more I wanted to see if I could measure up." —Mark Owen, #1 New York Times bestselling author of No Easy Day Because it's a novel, the truth can be told. Because it's the truth, you'll never forget it... Gene Wentz's Men in Green Faces is the classic novel of Vietnam that inspired a generation of SEALs. Here is the story of a good soldier trained to be part of an elite team of warriors—and of the killing grounds where he was forever changed. WITH A NEW FOREWORD BY THE AUTHOR Gene Michaels carries an M-60, eight hundred rounds, and a Bible. The ultimate SEAL, he also carries a murderous grudge against a bloodthirsty colonel who was once one of their own. To bring him in, Michaels and his men will go behind the lines, where they'll take on 5,000 NVA in the fight of their lives. In this stunning novel, former SEAL Gene Wentz brings to life what it was like to be a SEAL in Vietnam, running an endless tour of top-secret, death-defying operations deep in enemy territory. From the camaraderie to the harrowing recons, from brutal interrogations to incredible, toe-to-toe firefights, here are America's most feared warriors as you've never seen them before.

30 review for Men in Green Faces: A Novel of U.S. Navy SEALs

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

    While an interesting subject I found this book repetitive and hard to stay engaged with. The characters were pretty flat. The story is basically go out on an op, come back, fart around, go on another op ad nauseum. The lead character of the book was clearly the author and he really thought highly of himself. I also found it irritating how pious the guy was supposed to be when all he wanted to do was kill people. Read for insights into seal ops in nam rather than for a real story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

    An outstanding novel giving insight to our fighting men in Viet Nam..........particularly the Navy Seals. The only other book that captures your imagination as well was "Matterhorn" which was also a page turner and as intense. There are not as many books that cover the Viet Nam experience as well as other United States wars which may be due to the fact that none were so publicly disapproved of as much. In any case an intense, insightful book which is often used in psychology traning. An outstanding novel giving insight to our fighting men in Viet Nam..........particularly the Navy Seals. The only other book that captures your imagination as well was "Matterhorn" which was also a page turner and as intense. There are not as many books that cover the Viet Nam experience as well as other United States wars which may be due to the fact that none were so publicly disapproved of as much. In any case an intense, insightful book which is often used in psychology traning.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lindy Beth

    Luck. Also he cheated on his pregnant wife so you’re not that cool. The more I read about Nam the more it just sounds like a big testosterone fueled fuck up.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    He looked down the Son Ku Lon at the jungle clutching the riverbanks. Its vast blackness seemed to reach out to the edge of the earth like a black hole that sucked all life from those who drew near. Those who dared to venture in might never be heard from again. Scary. He stared at it. What was he doing here--all of them doing here? He was twenty years old. By law, a man, but inside, lots of times, he felt like he was still a boy. He'd never be a boy again. He used the 60 and the Bowie too well, He looked down the Son Ku Lon at the jungle clutching the riverbanks. Its vast blackness seemed to reach out to the edge of the earth like a black hole that sucked all life from those who drew near. Those who dared to venture in might never be heard from again. Scary. He stared at it. What was he doing here--all of them doing here? He was twenty years old. By law, a man, but inside, lots of times, he felt like he was still a boy. He'd never be a boy again. He used the 60 and the Bowie too well, too often. Not much left of innocence. That was for sure. Not after being thrown into this world of black and white, life and death. He started at the jungle. How many thousands had ventured in there to die? And if they lived to come out, how had they survived, going from playing street ball and dreaming of girls to the battlefields of Vietnam, where the playing fields were covered with bodies, blood and bones, killing and being killed? Maybe it was the hating, like he hated the colonel, that saved them, got them through and out. He shuddered. A feeling came over him that maybe he'd gotten too close. Maybe he couldn't reverse his heading into the mouth of triple-canopied death." Vietnam river surrounded by jungle: Meet Gene Michaels...or maybe not. As a Navy Seal, he is adept at being seen only when he wants to be. He's part of Lima platoon, deployed to the Mekong Delta, and base-camped on Seafloat between operations. He wasn't gung-ho about enlisting. In fact, he chose the Seals based on their reputation for one of the lowest mortality rates among any branch of the armed forces. However, over the last few months he has become known as a good luck charm of sorts. He's dedicated, skilled, deadly...and no one has died or been seriously injured while on an operation with him. Wentz takes us behind the scenes and into the action as we follow Michaels into the jungle. We see first hand the camaraderie, focus, and deadly precision of SEALs operations. Previously I had read The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien. Now, reading Men in Green Faces , I found the contrast between the war experiences of Army "grunts" and SEALs to be fascinating. Whereas foot soldiers often blindly followed orders and were frustrated by seemingly meaningless marches and battles in the "front-less war", SEALs went on missions with clearly delineated objectives and measures to judge success by. Gene doesn't always feel like he made a difference, but he often did. Bottom line: If you are looking for a classic novel with a well-defined story arc and in-depth character development then you will probably not view Wentz's offering as a 4 or 5 star book. However, if you are looking for a semi-autobiographical, in-your-face portrayal of the nitty-gritty experiences of Special Forces in Vietnam, this book delivers. I would argue that there *is* character development, you just have to read between the lines of the action to see it. Given a rating of 4.5 stars or "Outstanding". Recommended. A squad of Seals: Things I learned: A brief description of Navy Seals in Vietnam from the Navy Seal Museum's offical site. (Interesting stuff on the rest of the website as well). A study examining why SEALs handle stress better than other soldiers, and potential implications in treating PTSD

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Larsen

    In 1962, President John F. Kennedy saw a vision of the future. Believing that wars would be waged asymmetrically, President Kennedy made what was then a radical proposal: establish an elite special warfare unit capable of operating in all conflict zones. Enter the U.S. Navy Seals, the world’s most elite and versatile warriors trained to operate at sea, in the air, and on land. The motto of a U.S. Navy Seal, “Ready to Lead, Ready to Follow… Never Quit.” Since their inception more than half a Cen In 1962, President John F. Kennedy saw a vision of the future. Believing that wars would be waged asymmetrically, President Kennedy made what was then a radical proposal: establish an elite special warfare unit capable of operating in all conflict zones. Enter the U.S. Navy Seals, the world’s most elite and versatile warriors trained to operate at sea, in the air, and on land. The motto of a U.S. Navy Seal, “Ready to Lead, Ready to Follow… Never Quit.” Since their inception more than half a Century ago, Navy Seals have seen action in virtually every major conflict, from Korea, Desert Storm, Mogadishu Somalia, to today’s global War on Terror in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, Seals would earn their stripes in the summer of 1969 in the jungles and rice paddies of Vietnam bringing terror to a nefarious and cunning enemy, the menacingly brutal Viet Cong. In his breakthrough novel, Vietnam veteran and former U.S. Navy Seal, Gene Wentz delivers an unbiased and unflinching glimpse into the life, mentality, camaraderie, heart and soul of an elite warrior. Co-authored with Betty Abell Jurus, “Men in Green Faces: A Novel of U.S. Navy Seals” tells the fictional story of Navy Seal Team Leader Gene Michaels and his boisterous band of brothers attached to “Sea Float” a premiere Seal detachment tasked with some of the most dangerous and deadly missions downrange. Based on the real-life exploits of Gene Wentz, “Men in Green Faces: A Novel of U.S. Navy Seals” is an honest work of faction that immerses the audience into a harrowing tour of duty in the No Man’s Land of 1960’s Vietnam. In a war that would sear its place in history with more than 58 thousand American deaths, the elite Navy Seals are the United States military’s secret weapon to turn the tide in what can only be described as “Hell on Earth.” Here, Gene Michaels and his squad are given a daring assignment; capture or kill a rogue South Vietnamese Navy Seal who has turned the tables on an already stretched and demoralized U.S. military force. To stop his reign of terror, the impossible mission falls on the shoulders of Team Leader Gene Michaels and the Frogmen of Sea Float to close a dark, deadly chapter of the Vietnam War, never to be revealed on the evening news. Negotiating miles of thick jungle forest and rice paddies intercepting violent factions of NVA, VC and booby traps, for America’s Silent Warriors the hunt is on proving “The Only Easy Day Was Yesterday.” After listening to this book on Audible, I was very impressed with Gene Wentz’s storytelling of a politically hot-button topic and sad chapter in American military history. I couldn’t help but notice some striking similarities with Oliver Stone’s 1986 Oscar “Platoon” and Francis Ford Coppola’s 1979 war drama “Apocalypse Now.” While a work of faction, “Men in Green Faces: A Novel of U.S. Navy Seals” does not make a political statement but rather paints a visceral, human portrait of life in combat through the eyes of a venerable U.S. Navy Seal. Well-worth the time to read or listen!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Trace

    I found it fascinating and interesting to see the first-hand experience a soldier in Vietnam. very gruesome so definitely not for people who don't like horror or bloody stuff cause this book goes into a description of the horrors they saw in vietname. I think it is something that most should see especially if you don't support veterans cause it gives you a taste of what they went through and personally i respect them even more now I found it fascinating and interesting to see the first-hand experience a soldier in Vietnam. very gruesome so definitely not for people who don't like horror or bloody stuff cause this book goes into a description of the horrors they saw in vietname. I think it is something that most should see especially if you don't support veterans cause it gives you a taste of what they went through and personally i respect them even more now

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Lawson

    Navy SEAL operators go on missions in Vietnam. Lots and lots of missions ensue. The detailed description of the first mission was really interesting. The next five were entertaining. But after that, it just got repetitive. I lost count of how many happen in this book. They all ran together. This is a completely unironic portrayal of American forces in Vietnam as unsullied knights in armor. Their mission is just, their intentions honorable, their efforts universally embraced and appreciated by the Navy SEAL operators go on missions in Vietnam. Lots and lots of missions ensue. The detailed description of the first mission was really interesting. The next five were entertaining. But after that, it just got repetitive. I lost count of how many happen in this book. They all ran together. This is a completely unironic portrayal of American forces in Vietnam as unsullied knights in armor. Their mission is just, their intentions honorable, their efforts universally embraced and appreciated by the population. No, this isn't a comedy. The author is completely serious. Although billed as fiction, you also have to note that the main character is named "Gene", and he's the biggest, baddest, toughest of all the SEALs. No one comes close to how bad-ass this guy is. He's definitely the hero he thinks he is. He's the most professional of these elite professionals. Gosh, everyone should be impressed and jealous of this really really tough guy. Except when he's not. Because unlike a true SEAL, Gene completely loses his detachment to the job. You see, Gene's closest buddy is only days from going home, but he goes on one last mission. A cake walk, really. But shock of all shocks, Gene's buddy DIES! (When was this written? 1993??? Jesus, he should have known better.) After that, everything becomes a personal, drug fueled revenge fantasy to Gene. To no ill effect, of course. He just really loves killing bad guys. Gene's also incredibly humble and handsome and smart. All the bad guys get theirs, BTW. The mustache twirling NVA colonel gets his. The lazy braggart SEAL gets his (but then they kiss and make up, because they're all brothers under the skin). The arrogant Green Beret gets his. The green lieutenant who presumes his rank gives him the right to command subordinates gets his. Lots of getting his ensue.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Norm Konzelman

    I shouldn't, but I really liked the book (listened to audio version but not listed here). It was, except for the "service language", just the kind I would keep reading no matter how long it kept going. Two exceptions that ruined it for me towards the end. The guy was unfaithful to his wife, not in one way, but two. She faithfully wrote to him, carried his child, and longed for him to come home. But he also had to endanger his life because he let his personal revenge over a killed friend run it, p I shouldn't, but I really liked the book (listened to audio version but not listed here). It was, except for the "service language", just the kind I would keep reading no matter how long it kept going. Two exceptions that ruined it for me towards the end. The guy was unfaithful to his wife, not in one way, but two. She faithfully wrote to him, carried his child, and longed for him to come home. But he also had to endanger his life because he let his personal revenge over a killed friend run it, putting others in danger too so he could run himself out on a personal revenge mission, while his wife's letters were not even read. Just sayin'. I wasn't there. But what struck me in the book, there was no guilt the man felt he had to deal with. Not real to me. Which brings me to the end around the last two chapters. Near there the book started getting hokey to me. Just too made up. Not real. Whatever. Just a book I liked :)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sonny

    A decent read until one of the SEAL's gets killed then it kinda goes off the deep end. A decent read until one of the SEAL's gets killed then it kinda goes off the deep end.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rich Schmaltz

    Sad. Intense. War is terrible and this book illustrates it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David Bruner

    I read about this book in a biography be Mark Owens (pen name of a Navy SEAL who was involved in the killing of Osama bin Laden. Owens said this book inspired him to become a SEAL. I thought this book would be a similar format. It was, instead, a novelization based on the author's experiences in Vietnam. I found the novel format easy to read, engaging, and enjoyable. Although this type of account is subjective, being autobiographical, I think it takes a special type of person to become a special f I read about this book in a biography be Mark Owens (pen name of a Navy SEAL who was involved in the killing of Osama bin Laden. Owens said this book inspired him to become a SEAL. I thought this book would be a similar format. It was, instead, a novelization based on the author's experiences in Vietnam. I found the novel format easy to read, engaging, and enjoyable. Although this type of account is subjective, being autobiographical, I think it takes a special type of person to become a special forces operator. It is interesting to read about how they think, what motivates them, what their perceptions of events so foreign to most readers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sir Mullo

    So this was the only book or certainly one of a few that were only available to wannabe SEAL's of the future. i'm told its been widely read by a generation of SEAL's. After initially struggling with it (dont normally read fiction) I then couldnt put it down. Its one Op after another so the pace is good. Gave me a real sense of warfare in the jungle and what conditions were like. I was also shocked at one point when I suddenly became aware of how young these guys were and the things they were doi So this was the only book or certainly one of a few that were only available to wannabe SEAL's of the future. i'm told its been widely read by a generation of SEAL's. After initially struggling with it (dont normally read fiction) I then couldnt put it down. Its one Op after another so the pace is good. Gave me a real sense of warfare in the jungle and what conditions were like. I was also shocked at one point when I suddenly became aware of how young these guys were and the things they were doing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    James Hammond

    Realistic book—I was there As a Navy civilian, I shared a barge with a SEAL team anchored on the Saigon River at Nha Be for 3 weeks in July 1967. We were testing a drone minesweeper (MSD) to counter Riverine mines. I ate at the same mess hall with the SEALS and listened to them talk as they cleaned their weapons on the barge. They discussed a “hanging tree” at a nearby village they used for suspected VC. They only went out at night and were around most days.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Peter Lees

    Quite an interesting book on special forces in Vietnam. Probably a bit too much testosterone for me. War is such a terrible event and the death of people on either side, not to mention innocent victims is a tragedy.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Noel Burke

    Great story! Having read many Seal stories it was neat to hear a story that was back in Vietnam where awesome technology was far less present than what they have now. Great story of men willing to die for their country.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Allen

    This book was recommended to me by a US Veteran to help me better understand war and the camaraderie experienced by combat service members. I found it to be difficult, yet important reading. Highly recommend to anyone wanting to understand more about this time in our history.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Suzi

    Engaging, well written and very action packed. Loved it!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris dingwell

    Great Read Could not put the book down. One of the best military books about Vietnam you're going to read, you will NOT be disappointed reading this novel!!! Great Read Could not put the book down. One of the best military books about Vietnam you're going to read, you will NOT be disappointed reading this novel!!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Colton Hicswa

    if you like any kind if action and drama intensive book this is good

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eric Schudy

    good fast read face paced, interesting, goid characters. language a little dated, but it was 50 years ago. definitely worth a read. hoo-ya!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    One of the best war-time stories that I have ever read. I was riveted from the beginning to the end

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gary Bryant

    Stays with you for a long time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Very well written. Thrilling, eye opening, and sobering: a surprisingly raw glimpse into Navy SEAL life and combat in Vietnam.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Hughes

    After reading all of these other navy SEAL books and seeing that all of them mentioned this book I decided to read it to see what inspired them to become a SEAL. I now understand what drove them in the direction to do that. To anyone who likes books on either the start of the Navy SEALs, the Vietnam war, or the military this book is defiantly for you to read. Gene Wentz was one of the first to be in the elite group of Navy SEALS where he went through every terrible/ scary situation imaginable wh After reading all of these other navy SEAL books and seeing that all of them mentioned this book I decided to read it to see what inspired them to become a SEAL. I now understand what drove them in the direction to do that. To anyone who likes books on either the start of the Navy SEALs, the Vietnam war, or the military this book is defiantly for you to read. Gene Wentz was one of the first to be in the elite group of Navy SEALS where he went through every terrible/ scary situation imaginable while being over seas and fighting for the United States. These next paragraphs are going to be why I highly recommend this book. The first sentence of the book is " The deadliest men in Vietnam's Mekong Delta were operating...". After reading this I immediately got hooked into the book. He goes on to talk about the sights and smells of the Vietnam jungle. How closely they have to listen to every sound to pic out hostile noises. The one part that made me say wow was him talking about how close the enemy would get to them and not see them at all. " The squad froze. Over twenty of the enemy passed' just inches from their location". On every mission/OP they went on they always ran into either a burnt down village, hostiles, or a NVA HQ. They were always ready to fight and get some NVA soldiers. If they did take heavy contact then they would call in emergeny evac and get out with out anyone knowing they were there. At one point in the book he said " Enough time had passed that the enemy probably thought the SEALs had just disappeared, as usual". After reading how they can just vanish and hearing that they can vanish like ghosts. After reading it from a Navy SEALs it surprised me now knowing that it was true. There are a few sad moments in the book. After colonel Nguyen attacked a village for not joining the NVA he killed the leader and women and a little girl. The Seals had also captured a man from that same village who had his wife and daughter killed, joined the seals to fight he later died and wasn't able to avenge his village. On that same mission where that man died Genes friend Willie who after returning to the states was going to get married, was killed and after that Gene lost it then. Gene also put all the blame on himself for not being able to stop Willie from being killed and blames the whole thing on himself. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who finds this book interesting just by the review or because they want to read more about navy seals or for any other reason. This book is very interesting and in great detail about how it was to live in Vietnam for so long and how it was at that time. This book is very well written probably one of my favorites in line with No Easy Day and No Hero by Mark Owen and American Sniper by Chris Kyle and Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell. This book like the others are all very good and id recommend reading all of them.

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Glad

    Overall a nice read that shows both the character and determination (epic self-discipline too) of the Navy SEALs who perform these elite ops. (Technology might not change things that much, even if you would hope there might be some edge to it.) Incredible camaraderie to be sure too. Apparently a fictionalized account of the author's time there, it did give a good feel for how life was in Vietnam, down to a lot of the food in the mess halls being preserved and overall just grub. Lose a teammate's Overall a nice read that shows both the character and determination (epic self-discipline too) of the Navy SEALs who perform these elite ops. (Technology might not change things that much, even if you would hope there might be some edge to it.) Incredible camaraderie to be sure too. Apparently a fictionalized account of the author's time there, it did give a good feel for how life was in Vietnam, down to a lot of the food in the mess halls being preserved and overall just grub. Lose a teammate's life when you are that far from home and safe to say existence can be as lonely as the desire for revenge. (Along with shacking up with a nurse who saw quite a lot of trauma during almost continuous shifts.) A captured elderly Vietcong who loved Jack Daniels and one of the SEALs's fondness for him also made quite for quite memorable character development. As for the somewhat "between the lines" deeper story, was also interesting the patterns/signals used on the enemy territory how they appeared to signal one another they were not Americans versus American soldiers following the more intuitive/predictable path. (Such as one of the simple boats "hugging" the shore and sailing in and out of outlets, versus US ships surely just going straight to the intended destination.) Possible had it not been for the SEALs, the outcome of America's involvement in Vietnam would have been decided much sooner.... and probably much less favorably. Definitely one of those reviews where I sought to choose my words carefully to avoid any spoilers that REALLY would hurt the enjoyment of this book, even if maybe some aspects you can kind of figure would happen due to the nature of war. Also kind of one of those books about rising to the challenge in rather dark circumstances. In a certain college English class, had it been an assigned book years back, it would probably take the perspective of whether either side really had "right" on their side, as various North Vietnamese forces were brutal in what they did, but so were many South Vietnamese forces.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    This book is about a SEAL team unit in Vietnam that are stationed on the son Ku Lon River, and have to go out on different types of missions that will change their lives forever. This book describes the horrific and dissatisfying events and images of Vietnam's secret war. It goes through the various mental and physical changes that happen to the elite soldiers of Lima squad's SEAL team 1. It describes in detail were, how, but never why these terrible things happen to some of the most seemingly i This book is about a SEAL team unit in Vietnam that are stationed on the son Ku Lon River, and have to go out on different types of missions that will change their lives forever. This book describes the horrific and dissatisfying events and images of Vietnam's secret war. It goes through the various mental and physical changes that happen to the elite soldiers of Lima squad's SEAL team 1. It describes in detail were, how, but never why these terrible things happen to some of the most seemingly innocent of people. It tells a good story of what it was like to be in one of these elite groups, but also is an exciting piece that will keep you on your feet. If you like books based upon history and that are exiting I would defiantly recommend this book to you. Just don't make the same mistake I did and think it's a Non-fiction at the beginning

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dio Handoyo

    Superb writing. Though a work of fiction, this book takes the reader to the world of a Vietnam-era SEAL in a deeply immersive way. No wonder many now-SEALs were inspired to join the Teams because of this book. Fascinatingly, one can clearly see that even though the area of operations are different, the basic tenets of Naval Special Operations - rigorous planning, professionalism in execution, stacking the odds in your favor through surprise, speed, and violence of action - has stayed from the ju Superb writing. Though a work of fiction, this book takes the reader to the world of a Vietnam-era SEAL in a deeply immersive way. No wonder many now-SEALs were inspired to join the Teams because of this book. Fascinatingly, one can clearly see that even though the area of operations are different, the basic tenets of Naval Special Operations - rigorous planning, professionalism in execution, stacking the odds in your favor through surprise, speed, and violence of action - has stayed from the jungles of Vietnam to the modern battlefields of NSW all around the world.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    If you want an experience that will take you directly into the Vietnam conflict through the eyes of a Navy Seal who lived it, read this book. A fictionalized account of his time "in country" its unlike any other book I've ever read on the subject. Villans, heroes, folks on the line of both, and innocents all mix together in the sweltering Mekong delta, plus one Seal struggling to keep his faith in God. I read it in one night! If you want an experience that will take you directly into the Vietnam conflict through the eyes of a Navy Seal who lived it, read this book. A fictionalized account of his time "in country" its unlike any other book I've ever read on the subject. Villans, heroes, folks on the line of both, and innocents all mix together in the sweltering Mekong delta, plus one Seal struggling to keep his faith in God. I read it in one night!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mark Austin

    I actually don't remember the contents of this book as it was one of the dozen-odd Vietnam books I read in Middle School. I couldn't remember the names of most of them and they all became pretty much a blur. Since I can't remember the specific characters or events of any of them but remember liking most of them, my assumption is that none were terrible and none were exceptional. It's on my vague to-do list to read this again to give it a proper rating/review. But for now, this will have to do. I actually don't remember the contents of this book as it was one of the dozen-odd Vietnam books I read in Middle School. I couldn't remember the names of most of them and they all became pretty much a blur. Since I can't remember the specific characters or events of any of them but remember liking most of them, my assumption is that none were terrible and none were exceptional. It's on my vague to-do list to read this again to give it a proper rating/review. But for now, this will have to do.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    It was fast moving and an interesting insight into 1970's Vietnam from Gene Wentz, Navy Seal. I got turned on to this book as it was referenced by "Mark Owen" author of No Easy Day. The book wold have benefited from an afterward that told how Gene and his fellow seals made out after the book. Were some killed for example? Did his marriage survive? What finally happened to Colonel Nguyen? It was fast moving and an interesting insight into 1970's Vietnam from Gene Wentz, Navy Seal. I got turned on to this book as it was referenced by "Mark Owen" author of No Easy Day. The book wold have benefited from an afterward that told how Gene and his fellow seals made out after the book. Were some killed for example? Did his marriage survive? What finally happened to Colonel Nguyen?

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