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Hidden in the Mix: The African American Presence in Country Music

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Country music's debt to African American music has long been recognized. Black musicians have helped to shape the styles of many of the most important performers in the country canon. The partnership between Lesley Riddle and A. P. Carter produced much of the Carter Family's repertoire; the street musician Tee Tot Payne taught a young Hank Williams Sr.; the guitar playing Country music's debt to African American music has long been recognized. Black musicians have helped to shape the styles of many of the most important performers in the country canon. The partnership between Lesley Riddle and A. P. Carter produced much of the Carter Family's repertoire; the street musician Tee Tot Payne taught a young Hank Williams Sr.; the guitar playing of Arnold Schultz influenced western Kentuckians, including Bill Monroe and Ike Everly. Yet attention to how these and other African Americans enriched the music played by whites has obscured the achievements of black country-music performers and the enjoyment of black listeners.The contributors to Hidden in the Mix examine how country music became "white," how that fictive racialization has been maintained, and how African American artists and fans have used country music to elaborate their own identities. They investigate topics as diverse as the role of race in shaping old-time record catalogues, the transracial West of the hick-hopper Cowboy Troy, and the place of U.S. country music in postcolonial debates about race and resistance. Revealing how music mediates both the ideology and the lived experience of race, Hidden in the Mix challenges the status of country music as "the white man’s blues." Contributors. Michael Awkward, Erika Brady, Barbara Ching, Adam Gussow, Patrick Huber, Charles Hughes, Jeffrey A. Keith, Kip Lornell, Diane Pecknold, David Sanjek, Tony Thomas, Jerry Wever


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Country music's debt to African American music has long been recognized. Black musicians have helped to shape the styles of many of the most important performers in the country canon. The partnership between Lesley Riddle and A. P. Carter produced much of the Carter Family's repertoire; the street musician Tee Tot Payne taught a young Hank Williams Sr.; the guitar playing Country music's debt to African American music has long been recognized. Black musicians have helped to shape the styles of many of the most important performers in the country canon. The partnership between Lesley Riddle and A. P. Carter produced much of the Carter Family's repertoire; the street musician Tee Tot Payne taught a young Hank Williams Sr.; the guitar playing of Arnold Schultz influenced western Kentuckians, including Bill Monroe and Ike Everly. Yet attention to how these and other African Americans enriched the music played by whites has obscured the achievements of black country-music performers and the enjoyment of black listeners.The contributors to Hidden in the Mix examine how country music became "white," how that fictive racialization has been maintained, and how African American artists and fans have used country music to elaborate their own identities. They investigate topics as diverse as the role of race in shaping old-time record catalogues, the transracial West of the hick-hopper Cowboy Troy, and the place of U.S. country music in postcolonial debates about race and resistance. Revealing how music mediates both the ideology and the lived experience of race, Hidden in the Mix challenges the status of country music as "the white man’s blues." Contributors. Michael Awkward, Erika Brady, Barbara Ching, Adam Gussow, Patrick Huber, Charles Hughes, Jeffrey A. Keith, Kip Lornell, Diane Pecknold, David Sanjek, Tony Thomas, Jerry Wever

55 review for Hidden in the Mix: The African American Presence in Country Music

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chanda

    This book exposes the extent to which race and privilege can rewrite history. The African American roots of country music and its prominent players have been buried deep within american history by our white centered culture. I learned so much from this book that I didn’t even know existed. If you want to begin gaining a sense of what country music public memory has lost just because of skin color, read this.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I got this as a Goodreads Giveaway and although I take my obligation to read and review seriously, I just can't finish this book. It's not really a non-fiction work on the influence of African-American work in county music, but instead a collection of essays by experts reviewing everything from the history of the banjo in Black culture to the biography of one Virginian musician in the 1930's. I love reading and I love country music but this is not written for someone without a PhD in music histo I got this as a Goodreads Giveaway and although I take my obligation to read and review seriously, I just can't finish this book. It's not really a non-fiction work on the influence of African-American work in county music, but instead a collection of essays by experts reviewing everything from the history of the banjo in Black culture to the biography of one Virginian musician in the 1930's. I love reading and I love country music but this is not written for someone without a PhD in music history. I couldn't finish it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    HJ

    I found this to be a fascinating read. I am not a country music fan and I was pleased to discover you really don't have to be to enjoy this book. I found the historical aspects, and the sociological aspects of the book interesting. I recommend this one to anyone that is a fan of country music (or music in general). I know I will be looking at country music differently after reading it. I found this to be a fascinating read. I am not a country music fan and I was pleased to discover you really don't have to be to enjoy this book. I found the historical aspects, and the sociological aspects of the book interesting. I recommend this one to anyone that is a fan of country music (or music in general). I know I will be looking at country music differently after reading it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    781.64208 H6325 2013

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pmaheux

    Not a bad book but for the country fan only, if you're not, this is probably not for you! Not a bad book but for the country fan only, if you're not, this is probably not for you!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steve Haruch

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    Bruce Triggs

  8. 5 out of 5

    Walton

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    Lucas

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    Jason Mellard

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    Larry

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    Lindsay Cooper

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    Redpoet

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jill

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    MarieM

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    Clarence Goodman

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    Chris Estey

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    Caroline Bowers

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    Leanne Winchel

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    Alyssa Parker

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    Julie Hutchinson

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    George Ashmore

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    Maria Skoytellis

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    Alicia Simmons

  52. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  53. 4 out of 5

    Daniela

  54. 4 out of 5

    Dan Sampeck

  55. 5 out of 5

    Max

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