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Abortion: A Rational Look At An Emotional Issue

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In this book, Dr. R.C. Sproul employs his unique perspective as a highly experienced pastor-theologian and a trained philosopher to provide well-considered and compassionate answers to the difficult questions that attend termination of pregnancy. Dr. Sproul strives for a factual, well-reasoned approach informed by careful biblical scholarship. He considers both sides of th In this book, Dr. R.C. Sproul employs his unique perspective as a highly experienced pastor-theologian and a trained philosopher to provide well-considered and compassionate answers to the difficult questions that attend termination of pregnancy. Dr. Sproul strives for a factual, well-reasoned approach informed by careful biblical scholarship. He considers both sides of this issue in terms of biblical teaching, civil law, and natural law. This edition includes a new foreword by Dr. George Grant and has been updated to reflect developments in the issue of abortion. Appendixes provide further background on the issue of when life begins and list sources for pro-life resources.


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In this book, Dr. R.C. Sproul employs his unique perspective as a highly experienced pastor-theologian and a trained philosopher to provide well-considered and compassionate answers to the difficult questions that attend termination of pregnancy. Dr. Sproul strives for a factual, well-reasoned approach informed by careful biblical scholarship. He considers both sides of th In this book, Dr. R.C. Sproul employs his unique perspective as a highly experienced pastor-theologian and a trained philosopher to provide well-considered and compassionate answers to the difficult questions that attend termination of pregnancy. Dr. Sproul strives for a factual, well-reasoned approach informed by careful biblical scholarship. He considers both sides of this issue in terms of biblical teaching, civil law, and natural law. This edition includes a new foreword by Dr. George Grant and has been updated to reflect developments in the issue of abortion. Appendixes provide further background on the issue of when life begins and list sources for pro-life resources.

30 review for Abortion: A Rational Look At An Emotional Issue

  1. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    I'm a lifelong evangelical Christian, and I'm still looking for a Christian-based pro-life argument that shows at least passing understanding of women's history, the sexual mores at play in the abortion debate, and the real arguments being put forth by the choice community. This wasn't it. Sproul's statement that an unborn baby is "in the same location" as the woman's body, but not "part" of it was particularly dense (not to mention biologically incorrect). I've given birth to a beautiful son, w I'm a lifelong evangelical Christian, and I'm still looking for a Christian-based pro-life argument that shows at least passing understanding of women's history, the sexual mores at play in the abortion debate, and the real arguments being put forth by the choice community. This wasn't it. Sproul's statement that an unborn baby is "in the same location" as the woman's body, but not "part" of it was particularly dense (not to mention biologically incorrect). I've given birth to a beautiful son, whom I talked to throughout my pregnancy as a separate person. But pregnancy and childbirth were not independent events happening "in the same location as my body." They were the most physically demanding things to ever happen to my body. You can argue that a zygote/embryo/fetus/unborn baby is an independent being, but you must also acknowledge that it is an integrated part of a woman's body, affecting her own life and health. To essentially say that bodily autonomy doesn't even have a place in the discussion about abortion is in keeping with the misogynistic rhetoric that I continue to hear come out of my community of faith on this topic. I've yet to hear a pro-life advocate say that all people should be required to be organ donors since organ donation saves real, separate, human lives (that are fully formed, fully self-aware, and express a desire to live). More and more, I suspect the difference is that organ donation is an egalitarian issue (of course men should have control of their bodies, even if it means the unnecessary death of a separate human being). Pregnancy, on the other hand, is specifically female. Two stars because it gave me more to think about, even if it did just raise more questions for me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    What you think about abortion reflects what you think about God. Does that sound harsh? I don't mean for it to or to be judgmental, however, that is what theology is about. The gospel addresses abortion and the gospel is about forgiveness. RC Sproul is very clear in his teaching on this issue and you will gleam new insights. The book is more written towards those that have the position of, I don't believe in abortion, but however, I do not want to take that right from another. RC Sproul goes int What you think about abortion reflects what you think about God. Does that sound harsh? I don't mean for it to or to be judgmental, however, that is what theology is about. The gospel addresses abortion and the gospel is about forgiveness. RC Sproul is very clear in his teaching on this issue and you will gleam new insights. The book is more written towards those that have the position of, I don't believe in abortion, but however, I do not want to take that right from another. RC Sproul goes into depth on the lie that is in that statement. Whenever a society or an individual puts itself on a slippery slope, it will crash. Abortion is really about the gospel to both women and the babies. For women that have had abortions, the church is not a place of judgement but a place of redemption with repentance. Abortion opposes the gospel because it is subverts God, it redefines sin, abortion ignores the cross and takes away faith in who God is. Abortion takes it out of God's hand and puts in ours. As I was reading this, you see the lies that the media and our government have told the American people on this issue. The right to life is taken away by the personal right of one individual. When the rights of life is compromised, then all of our rights are. The study goes into the clarification of when life begins and how our own laws are not in sync. Example when a pregnant woman is murdered, the murder charge is for two not one. Another example is the fight for frozen eggs. I think we will see more of this as the acceptance of gay marriage comes into fruition. Towards the end of the book, he addresses the science of life. Something whether you live under the authority of God or not is pretty amazing. Abortion is really about what a society thinks about life. Abortion is violent against women. Abortion only increases poverty in neglect in children, the numbers show this to be true. Abortion is a lie.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    A very sobering read. I'm so thankful that Dr. Sproul has taken the time to write a piece that is clear, coherent, and rational. I pray the Lord, in His grace, will use this book to preserve the lives of those with no voice. Even more so, I pray those whose lives may be spared, along with those performing and receiving abortions, would hear the good news of the gospel, and receive the gift of eternal life in Chris Jesus our Lord.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Regular Joe

    This is the second book I have read recently that hasn't been reviewed yet on Amazon.com. Knowing how popular R.C. Sproul is this came as a great surprise. An even greater surprise was the subject matter in his book entitled "ABORTION (A Rational Look at an Emotional Issue)." Since most of R.C. Sproul's books are on Theology, Church history and Logic, it seemed unusual for him to write a book on abortion. I'm very happy that he did. The book is divided into three parts: Part I: Abortion: The Ethic This is the second book I have read recently that hasn't been reviewed yet on Amazon.com. Knowing how popular R.C. Sproul is this came as a great surprise. An even greater surprise was the subject matter in his book entitled "ABORTION (A Rational Look at an Emotional Issue)." Since most of R.C. Sproul's books are on Theology, Church history and Logic, it seemed unusual for him to write a book on abortion. I'm very happy that he did. The book is divided into three parts: Part I: Abortion: The Ethical Dilemma of Our Time. Part II: An Analysis of Pro-Abortion and Pro-Choice Arguments. Part III: A Compassionate Response and Strategy In Part I, Sproul points out how emotionally divided America is over the abortion issue, with the potential of ripping apart the social fabric of one of history's most successful nations. In doing this, he covers some of the core issues like "Is a fetus a living human person?" "When does life begin?" the sanctity of life from a biblical viewpoint, the sanctity of life in Natural Law and how abortion violates that sanctity. Sproul summarizes this as follows: "A negative prohibition again actual and potential murder implicitly involves a positive mandate to work for the protection, sustenance, and respect for the sanctity of life. To oppose murder is to promote life. Whatever else abortion does, it does not promote the life of the unborn child. Although some people will argue that abortion promotes the quality of life of those who do not desire offspring, it does not promote the life of the subject in question, the developing unborn child." I found Sproul's section on how abortion can be shown to violate Natural Law very interesting and which a brief history of abortion in both America and world history. He states that "Abortion--whatever else it may be--is an act against nature." This is great information for those who do not recognize or honor the scriptures. Sproul really begins to get to the crux of the matter when he addresses the central point of "When does life begin?", a question he covers from the biblical, medical and legal viewpoints. Being ever so thorough, Sproul even focuses a chapter on the role of Government in abortion. I haven't heard the issue of abortion presented from this vantage point before. In Part II, Sproul provides an analysis of the Pro-Abortion and Pro-Choice (there is a difference) arguments. This part is where Sproul is at his finest, sifting through the often-heard clichés from these groups like "a woman alone has the moral right to her own body," "women have a legal right to privacy on abortion" and "men have no right to address abortion because it is a women's issue." He carefully peals back the arguments, revealing the underlying paper-thin arguments that cannot be honestly defended. To the Pro-Choice chapter is such a revealing study and asks questions every citizen in America needs to ask themselves and honestly answer. According to Sproul, there are relatively few in America who are Pro-Abortion and many more individuals who are Pro-Choice, or at least they think they are. Again, Sproul reveals just what is meant when we claim we are Pro-Choice. He wraps up Part II with a chapter on The Problem of Unwanted Pregnancies. Part III covers the Pro-Life position and strategy. Sproul ends his book with a fascinating 33-page Appendix which includes a transcript of testimony provided by Jerome Lejeune, M.D., Ph.D, a Professor of Fundamental Genetics, during a court proceeding in August, 1989. I was impressed with the way Dr. Sproul handled this sensitive and emotionally-charged subject. The only drawback I found was the book is 20 years old and, though the arguments are timeless, some of the data is in need of a updating. It is a fast read, yet at the same time very thought-provoking, just like most of his books.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lady Makaveli

    Nothing but anti-choice, religious lies created and formulated to make women feel bad about having an abortion. It is his opinion is not what I had hoped it would be when I read this; I am Pagan but from what I understand Jesus was compassionate- it's amazing how may of these xtians don't practice what their book says. Additionally, who is he or you or anyone else to look down and judge another woman? Shameful. Humanity sometimes seems to have no hope.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    I was glad to see this book available for free on kindle, so I decided to read it. I am both anti-abortion and anti-capital punishment/death penalties, and I get upset when I read pro-life books that seem to be for one and against another. This wasn't a bad book, but I felt it was more opinionated rather than filled with great proofs, though there were some of that too. I liked the short chapter about having mercy on women who have had abortions and suffer the guilt of the decision they had once I was glad to see this book available for free on kindle, so I decided to read it. I am both anti-abortion and anti-capital punishment/death penalties, and I get upset when I read pro-life books that seem to be for one and against another. This wasn't a bad book, but I felt it was more opinionated rather than filled with great proofs, though there were some of that too. I liked the short chapter about having mercy on women who have had abortions and suffer the guilt of the decision they had once made. I think the book ended pretty abruptly after a lengthy chapter that was a court conversation with an embriotic specialist doctor of sorts. It was pretty much the most interesting part of the whole book. I did like a few things that Sproul said, but for the most part, I lacked interest in the book. It was a very fast read though. There were summaries to close out each chapter (other than the last). I give it more of a 2.75 star rating.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Randy Alcorn

    When I read R. C. Sproul’s book on abortion twenty years ago I was still a pastor. I recall how grateful I was that a respected theologian had spoken out so clearly on the critical issue of abortion. At the time, such voices were few and far between, with many evangelical theologians seemingly silent about the plight of unborn children. Sproul’s logic is sharp and penetrating, and his reliance on biblical authority is refreshing. The appendix, in which Dr. Jerome Lejeune offers courtroom testimo When I read R. C. Sproul’s book on abortion twenty years ago I was still a pastor. I recall how grateful I was that a respected theologian had spoken out so clearly on the critical issue of abortion. At the time, such voices were few and far between, with many evangelical theologians seemingly silent about the plight of unborn children. Sproul’s logic is sharp and penetrating, and his reliance on biblical authority is refreshing. The appendix, in which Dr. Jerome Lejeune offers courtroom testimony, is a great bonus. I’m happy to recommend the re-release of Dr. Sproul’s book on this vital subject, and I pray God will use it to enlighten many new readers.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Excellent presentation of the pro-life argument against abortion on demand. The book carefully covers every aspect of this debate and presents an abundance of evidence and logic to conclude that abortion is indeed the taking of a human life. Appendix A is a very helpful discussion of the development and viability of the fetus, arguing, through the use of court testimony, that even a zygote can be regarded as nothing less than an "early human being." A timely read as we come to Sanctity of Human Excellent presentation of the pro-life argument against abortion on demand. The book carefully covers every aspect of this debate and presents an abundance of evidence and logic to conclude that abortion is indeed the taking of a human life. Appendix A is a very helpful discussion of the development and viability of the fetus, arguing, through the use of court testimony, that even a zygote can be regarded as nothing less than an "early human being." A timely read as we come to Sanctity of Human Life Sunday this week.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Luke Seelenbinder

    Sproul writes an excellent overview of the issues pertaining to abortion. He approaches it in a manner that is both logical and heart-felt. His conclusions are weighed and balanced and judgements frank, honest, and humble. He adds an appendix containing testimony by a French geneticist concerning the formation of life from fertilization until fetus. The appendix is worth its weight in gold. I am not overstating it, at all. If you need a holistic understanding of the debate that is raging in socie Sproul writes an excellent overview of the issues pertaining to abortion. He approaches it in a manner that is both logical and heart-felt. His conclusions are weighed and balanced and judgements frank, honest, and humble. He adds an appendix containing testimony by a French geneticist concerning the formation of life from fertilization until fetus. The appendix is worth its weight in gold. I am not overstating it, at all. If you need a holistic understanding of the debate that is raging in society at large, pick this up and read it. It is well worth the time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    AlegnaB †

    This book may be helpful to those who consider themselves pro-choice. It will give them some information that they perhaps don't know and will prompt them to think logically and consistently about various things relating to abortion. I found the scientific info from the transcript of the testimony in court of the French professor of genetics (who won a prize "for being first to discover a disease caused by chromosomal abnormality -- Down's syndrome") to be quite fascinating.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark A Powell

    Abortion is one of the most polarizing issues in our day, in part due to the passionate responses associated with either side of the discussion. Attempting to strip away the emotional veneer and deal primarily with the rational presuppositions of abortion, Sproul has re-released this classic work. While overtly Christian, Sproul’s arguments are not limited to that sphere. Updated with relevant data from the last twenty years, this remains a beneficial examination of a hotly-contested issue.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I am a pro-life Christian and was wanting to gain an additional perspective on the abortion debate that was less biased and more balanced/rational. I believe this insight is helpful in properly addressing such an emotional issue both within the Christian community and outside of it, with both respect and sound reason. I was hoping to gain this insight from R.C. Sproul, but I was sorely disappointed. Not only does R.C. Spiral claim to offer a balanced and objective look at the issue and fail to d I am a pro-life Christian and was wanting to gain an additional perspective on the abortion debate that was less biased and more balanced/rational. I believe this insight is helpful in properly addressing such an emotional issue both within the Christian community and outside of it, with both respect and sound reason. I was hoping to gain this insight from R.C. Sproul, but I was sorely disappointed. Not only does R.C. Spiral claim to offer a balanced and objective look at the issue and fail to do so, but I actually think he does more harm than good in addressing such a nuanced issue with such sloppiness. Sproul’s entire book has serious scope issues, specifically as it relates to his targeted audience. If he wanted to write a book that would perfectly resonate with biased evangelical Christians who don’t properly look at both sides, then he succeeded. However, he clearly states within his book that “This book is addressed primarily to those who are not sure about the ethics of abortion” (pg. 72). If this is his primary audience, then I will boldly state that he did a terrible job addressing his primary audience. Instead of offering a compassionate and empathetic view into the pro-choice side, he puts down and condemns those who are not pro-life. This is not only an unloving approach as a Christian, but it is a terrible way to win people over to your view. I’m convinced that although there is validity to RC Sproul’s conclusion and arguments, his arguments were written in such a haphazardly organized and sloppy way, that they are not convincing to someone who doesn’t already hold the pro-life position. Many of his chapters were too short and not an efficient conciseness. Instead of spending adequate time on the nuances and depth of arguments, he skimmed over the arguments he should have spent more time on and then went into detail on sub-points that could have either been omitted or condensed. For example, Sproul spent a mere 14 pages of the book addressing “common” arguments in the debate and analyzing the pro-choice side. This is far too little to spend on such a nuanced issue. For the three arguments he did choose to address (which I don’t see as the core arguments), he skimmed over and immediately discredited them, instead of giving full weight to the issue in explanation, interpretation, analysis, counter-arguments, and conclusions. If this was an abortion paper or thesis/dissertation in a philosophy class and I were the professor, I would not pass the paper. He oversimplified most arguments and didn’t provide substantial care or time to address things properly. Clearly Sproul is passionate about pro-life and the value of human life, but it was disappointing that he was not able to carefully argue his case to both pro-life and pro-choice audiences. This book felt less like a philosophical and ethical rhetoric book (which is what he claimed it was) and more like an over-simplified pamphlet from an evangelical church at a pro-life rally. He was pushy in his agenda, but not persuasive or thorough in his arguments.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Thompson

    Yesterday students across the nation took part in the National Pro Life Day of Silent Solidarity which got me thinking about this book by R.C. Sproul. This was updated and released just in time for 37th anniversary for the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision. The goal was to get this book in the hands of every congressman and senator in Washington. If they read the book, it would not doubt have an impact. This book is well worth the read, and I would encourage everyone objectively thinking about Yesterday students across the nation took part in the National Pro Life Day of Silent Solidarity which got me thinking about this book by R.C. Sproul. This was updated and released just in time for 37th anniversary for the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision. The goal was to get this book in the hands of every congressman and senator in Washington. If they read the book, it would not doubt have an impact. This book is well worth the read, and I would encourage everyone objectively thinking about this issue to go out a buy a copy. One by one, Sproul tackles the objections of the pro-choice crowd and systematically and intelligently dismantles each of them. There is much discussion on issues such as the role of government, imposing morality, when life actually begins and the nature of sin in general. But, wait, there’s more… It seems as though most pro-life material out there seeks to either pull at the heart strings or outrage the civilized, clear thinking conscience. However, this book provides a well-thought out philosophical worldview that not only is not only useful in attacking pro-choice arguments, but grounds the Christian in a thoroughly Biblical foundation that promotes the sanctity of life in the image of God. Here’s just one example of what you will find in the book: “In so far as we are still human, we retain the image of God in the wider sense. We are still valuable creatures. We may no longer be worthy, but we still have worth. This is the resounding biblical message of redemption. The creatures God created are the same creatures He is moved to redeem. Because Christians speak so tirelessly about human sin, do they have a low view of humanity? Indeed, they have a love view of human virtue, but not a corresponding love view of human worth or importance. It is precisely because the Bible has such a high view of human dignity that Christian take human sin so seriously. If one rat steals another rat’s food, we don’t get morally outraged. But, it one human steals another human’s food, we rightly become concerned.” (pages 22-23) Clearly, R.C. Sproul’s gift is his ability to explain difficult concepts in an easy-to-understand manner. I taught through much of this material with my high school students and found it a huge help. The summary and discussion questions at the end of each chapter also help in taking in all this material. I don’t normally say this, but this is a “must-read.” If you have any commitment to the life issue, buy this book! If you wonder why so many are committed to the life issue, buy this book! You will not regret it. Disclaimer: This book was provided by the publisher for review. I was under no obligation to offer a favorable review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lois

    The title says it all. I've long appreciated R.C. Sproul's thoughtful and thorough reasoning in his sermons and writings. This book is no different. Whereas abortion is a hot button topic in the social arena, I do think it is necessary and possible to discuss rationally the moral implications of Roe vs. Wade. "If we regard the embryo or fetus as a living human person, then the moral implications of destroying that person prior to birth are enormous. As long as we can convince ourselves that a fet The title says it all. I've long appreciated R.C. Sproul's thoughtful and thorough reasoning in his sermons and writings. This book is no different. Whereas abortion is a hot button topic in the social arena, I do think it is necessary and possible to discuss rationally the moral implications of Roe vs. Wade. "If we regard the embryo or fetus as a living human person, then the moral implications of destroying that person prior to birth are enormous. As long as we can convince ourselves that a fetus is not human until birth, we are relieved of those difficulties." [from chapter four, When Does Life Begin?] He points out that the whole abortion debate cannot even begin until there is an agreement on when life begins. Science shows that once an egg and a sperm fertilize, there is life, whether in a test tube or in the womb. He shares the experience his daughter had of delivering a stillborn baby. The doctor told her, "I'm sorry, your baby has died." Even in the case of a spontaneous abortion [miscarriage], the embryo or fetus is merely in an earlier stage of development. The book is in three parts: Part I is titled, Abortion: The Ethical Dilemma of Our Time. Part II is, An Analysis of Pro-Abortion and Pro-Choice Arguments. Part III is, A Compassionate Response and Strategy. Appendix A contained a court transcript from a geneticist who was questioned on the beginning of human life. That was fascinating to me, as it should be for anyone who desires the scientific approach to when life begins. The book is logically laid out, common positions and assertions are addressed, and it is easy for a lay person to understand, but it is not overly-simplistic. Only one error glared, and I'm surprised it got past an editor. In chapter ten Sproul made reference to Beethoven's contribution to human culture even after he went blind. Beethoven went DEAF, not blind; that disability was more devastating to a musician. But the point remains that "unwanted" babies, or those with "debilitating conditions" are still deserving of life. I recommend this book for everyone with an open mind. It was merely coincidental [or perhaps providential is a better word choice] that I finished reading this on the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy

    I appreciated Sproul weighing in on this topic. Those who have read other works on pro-life works (see my review of Scott Klusendorf's work) will not find anything dramatically new here. Yet it's good to read and review the pro-life's argument. One thing that stood out as unique in this book was actually George Grant's preface. Grant summarized the current landscape in our society, political sphere and culture as the result of the abortion debate since Roe vs. Wade. This fascinating essay filled I appreciated Sproul weighing in on this topic. Those who have read other works on pro-life works (see my review of Scott Klusendorf's work) will not find anything dramatically new here. Yet it's good to read and review the pro-life's argument. One thing that stood out as unique in this book was actually George Grant's preface. Grant summarized the current landscape in our society, political sphere and culture as the result of the abortion debate since Roe vs. Wade. This fascinating essay filled with footnotes by Grant puts into perspective for the Christian the extent of how much the abortion controversy has seeped into so many spheres of our lives today. The book is worth reading for the preface alone. Getting into Sproul's actual work I do appreciate how the author does deal with various objections given against the prolife position. I was reminded that more women have been known to have been killed by abortion after Roe vs. Wade than before it which makes the back alley abortion argument for legalizing abortion kind of ironic. Concerning the argument that the fetus is part of the woman's body, Sproul bring modern study of cells to bear, noting that babies have a different genetic fingerprint than the mother. The more interesting part of the book is the appendix that ended up being a rather lengthy testimony of a medical expert on the status of the embryo. Perhaps a little too lengthy. Sproul could have had his arguments tighter and I say this because I've seen other works that have made it air tight in their presentation. For those who might want to read an introductory work or to remind and refresh their prolife apologetics I can recommend this work.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Myers

    A book that should be read by every Christian, especially those who consider themselves pro-choice when it comes to abortion.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steve Hemmeke

    Sproul calmly and persuasively argues for the pro-life position. The strength of this book is that he does not preach to the choir, but assumes his audience is either on the fence or pro-choice. Sproul first sets forth his position, delving into issues of law, when life begins. He then answers the pro-choice arguments: a woman's right to her body, dangerous black-market abortions, inconsistency with capital punishment. The take I appreciated most was the critique of the middle-ground position, tha Sproul calmly and persuasively argues for the pro-life position. The strength of this book is that he does not preach to the choir, but assumes his audience is either on the fence or pro-choice. Sproul first sets forth his position, delving into issues of law, when life begins. He then answers the pro-choice arguments: a woman's right to her body, dangerous black-market abortions, inconsistency with capital punishment. The take I appreciated most was the critique of the middle-ground position, that if I'm not sure abortion is morally right or wrong, then I default to let a woman choose. The change to this position from the default of life was made in the 1970s, both before and after Roe v. Wade. Sproul answers this ably, and calls on us to speak with those we know on the fence. One of the failings of the church has been to only preach to the choir. We just get angry at people who are really unsure about this issue. We have little patience with them. So how can we possibly persuade them? But Sproul gives us Biblical, sound and useful arguments to bring to friends, congressmen, etc. He also includes a chapter gracefully asserting that abortion is not the unforgivable sin. Guilt is real and can be an overwhelming feeling, but it can be removed in God's sight. There is a long and interesting appendix about whether frozen embryos are alive, or should be treated as persons. This is must reading for pastors and pregnancy center volunteers, and anyone who finds they have pro-choice friends open to talking about it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lillie

    The author demonstrates that the Bible condemns abortion, and then shows that advances in science now prove that unborn babies are human beings. He points out that the people to target in trying to bring pro-choice advocates to the pro-life position are those who say they are personally against abortion but don't want to force their views on women who have the right to choose. That's like saying you are personally opposed to murder but don't want to take away others' right to choose. Some things The author demonstrates that the Bible condemns abortion, and then shows that advances in science now prove that unborn babies are human beings. He points out that the people to target in trying to bring pro-choice advocates to the pro-life position are those who say they are personally against abortion but don't want to force their views on women who have the right to choose. That's like saying you are personally opposed to murder but don't want to take away others' right to choose. Some things are not a matter of choice. One of the most interesting things in this book to me was an appendix. The French geneticist who discovered the chromosome for Down syndrome testified in a case in which a divorcing couple were in a custody battle over frozen embryos remaining after they tried in vitro fertilization, and the transcript of his testimony was in the appendix. The geneticist spoke in English as a second language, but his description of the development of a baby from conception was absolutely lyrical. He never wavered; no matter how many ways the lawyers tried to get him to say that the embryos should be destroyed, he insisted they should not be destroyed as they were living human beings.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evan Minton

    This book on abortion, written by the late R.C Sproul, is a wonderful resource. Sproul puts forth both biblical arguments and non-biblical arguments against abortion. This is a good tactic as there are unfortunately pro-choicers within the Christian community, and while non-Christian pro-choice advocates won't be moved by or even care about the scriptural arguments, for those who take The Bible as their highest authority on matters of faith and practice, these arguments will have some real oomph This book on abortion, written by the late R.C Sproul, is a wonderful resource. Sproul puts forth both biblical arguments and non-biblical arguments against abortion. This is a good tactic as there are unfortunately pro-choicers within the Christian community, and while non-Christian pro-choice advocates won't be moved by or even care about the scriptural arguments, for those who take The Bible as their highest authority on matters of faith and practice, these arguments will have some real oomph. Of course, Sproul also gives an argument against abortion that relies on (1) scientific evidence for the fetus' status and alive and(2) human coupled with our universal recognition that human life is sacred. These two facts, taken together, logically entail that abortion is morally wrong, as abortion is the termination of a human life. Aside from making the case against abortion, Sproul also examines arguments pro-choicers give in favor of it, demonstrating that the major argument suffers from various flaws. This is a good book to make the case for life.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dave Jones

    I got this as an Amazon freebie on the anniversary of Roe v. Wade (Jan 22). Much of this is nothing new. Rev. Sproul reviews and responds to the major arguments for/against legalized abortion. A good primer. However, at times his rationale is profound. I especially enjoyed his take on the role of government from a Divine perspective. Appendix A featured testimony in a court case involving the disposition of frozen embryos in a divorce case. This transcript is of Dr. Jerome Lejeune. He was (he pas I got this as an Amazon freebie on the anniversary of Roe v. Wade (Jan 22). Much of this is nothing new. Rev. Sproul reviews and responds to the major arguments for/against legalized abortion. A good primer. However, at times his rationale is profound. I especially enjoyed his take on the role of government from a Divine perspective. Appendix A featured testimony in a court case involving the disposition of frozen embryos in a divorce case. This transcript is of Dr. Jerome Lejeune. He was (he passed away in 1994) a world-renowned geneticist who discovered the chromosomal abnormality causing Down's syndrome. This is a fascinating description of pre-natal development and an excellent treatise on the beginning of life. Appendix B features resources that direct the reader to related websites. I would've liked a brief description of each site. The book has endnotes and a bibliography. The forward by Dr. George Grant is well done too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    An excellent book on the abortion issue. Sproul is calm and careful, but not afraid to speak the truth. What sets this book apart is how Sproul appeals to those who are on the fence. He is not preaching to the choir. Nor is he trying to convince hard-core pro-abortion folks. He is talking to those who would not have abortions, but think women should be able to choose. Or the group that says it is legal so it must be okay. He addresses many of the objections to the pro-life movement. A very good An excellent book on the abortion issue. Sproul is calm and careful, but not afraid to speak the truth. What sets this book apart is how Sproul appeals to those who are on the fence. He is not preaching to the choir. Nor is he trying to convince hard-core pro-abortion folks. He is talking to those who would not have abortions, but think women should be able to choose. Or the group that says it is legal so it must be okay. He addresses many of the objections to the pro-life movement. A very good work that fills a gap in abortion discussion. There is one weakness: It was written twenty years ago. This is not an automatic strike against it. But the impact of relativism is not adequately addressed in the book. Many people today do not think rational. As Ravi Zacharias says, "They feel with their eyes and think with their feelings." It would have been nice if an additional chapter was added that addressed the post-modern way of thinking about abortion.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marguerite Harrell

    Great interesting book to read. There is one major error concerning about Beethoven. He didn't become blind, but he did become deaf later in his life. I really enjoy learning a lot of things that I didn't know before about how pro-choice got its name. Yet, pro-choice hurt the pro-life position, but pro-choice (being in the middle) supporting pro-abortion group even they might not agree with abortion case. I did find the Appendix A very interesting about the guy from France to witness in court in Great interesting book to read. There is one major error concerning about Beethoven. He didn't become blind, but he did become deaf later in his life. I really enjoy learning a lot of things that I didn't know before about how pro-choice got its name. Yet, pro-choice hurt the pro-life position, but pro-choice (being in the middle) supporting pro-abortion group even they might not agree with abortion case. I did find the Appendix A very interesting about the guy from France to witness in court in Tennessee about the embryo or fetus study. Whoa! That is very interesting to learn. I am an "idiot" about science or biology. I did wish that I did pay attention to that in High School but didn't. I do have a lot to learn. I would read them again if needed since I do volunteer at Crisis Pregnancy Center.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Ross

    I appreciate anyone who can deal with a potentially explosive emotional issue in a calm, logical, rational way. That's what Sproul does in this book. While he is definitely on the pro-life side of the debate, he is very fair at trying to present and understand all sides - pro-abortion, pro-choice, and pro-life, while presenting a pro-life argument from the standpoint of natural law, biblical theology, the role of government and more. For anyone interested, I wrote a full review on my blog at http I appreciate anyone who can deal with a potentially explosive emotional issue in a calm, logical, rational way. That's what Sproul does in this book. While he is definitely on the pro-life side of the debate, he is very fair at trying to present and understand all sides - pro-abortion, pro-choice, and pro-life, while presenting a pro-life argument from the standpoint of natural law, biblical theology, the role of government and more. For anyone interested, I wrote a full review on my blog at http://jeffrossblog.com/2013/02/03/bo.... I also included there a 23-minute video of Sproul being interviewed on the subject. The book is extremely worthwhile for all who want a logical, rational discussion of the subject, regardless of the current position they hold. I recommend it to you.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anderson E O'campo

    The book is very well written, easy to understand though it is philosophical, theological and scientific. It touches on both sides of the abortion issue pro-abortion and pro-life. However RC Sproul states that pro-choice is not neutral position but without acknowledging, it supports the pro-abortion movement. The appendix is remarkable, DNA is definitely the evidence that a fetus is a human being even before being a fetus, when it is an embryo it already has the DNA information and all the machin The book is very well written, easy to understand though it is philosophical, theological and scientific. It touches on both sides of the abortion issue pro-abortion and pro-life. However RC Sproul states that pro-choice is not neutral position but without acknowledging, it supports the pro-abortion movement. The appendix is remarkable, DNA is definitely the evidence that a fetus is a human being even before being a fetus, when it is an embryo it already has the DNA information and all the machinery how that person will be when fully developed. I really loved this book and highlighted many quotes for future study.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Van

    This book is a great book for presenting the pro-life side of abortion on demand. It comes from a moral sense and presents quotes from the Bible. I liked how it asked the question like what is the value in life, when does life truly begin, and what role does the government have in abortion. The book also explain how pro-choice is different from pro-abortion and gives counter arguments for three arguments pro-choice people have. I would recommend this book for anyone struggling with a decision on This book is a great book for presenting the pro-life side of abortion on demand. It comes from a moral sense and presents quotes from the Bible. I liked how it asked the question like what is the value in life, when does life truly begin, and what role does the government have in abortion. The book also explain how pro-choice is different from pro-abortion and gives counter arguments for three arguments pro-choice people have. I would recommend this book for anyone struggling with a decision on abortion because it is a great explanation of the pro-life side.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    This book helps sort through not only the pro-life position from a biblical and natural law standpoint, but also sorts through the various arguments against the pro-life position. He provides an excellent appendix of a court proceeding of a French doctor who testified to the beginning of life at conception from scientific conclusions. This is a quick read, and a great reference.Abortion: A Rational Look At An Emotional Issue This book helps sort through not only the pro-life position from a biblical and natural law standpoint, but also sorts through the various arguments against the pro-life position. He provides an excellent appendix of a court proceeding of a French doctor who testified to the beginning of life at conception from scientific conclusions. This is a quick read, and a great reference.Abortion: A Rational Look At An Emotional Issue

  27. 4 out of 5

    Frank Peters

    This is, I believe an excellent book. However, from my perspective it has also misrepresented itself. The book is really only designed for those who are at least nominally pro-life. For this audience, the book is outstanding. The arguments are well put together and provide good talking points should a conversation come up. But, I really cannot see anyone, who was not pro-life managing to get through the book without being irritated. Now that I have read the book, I think I will read the Amazon r This is, I believe an excellent book. However, from my perspective it has also misrepresented itself. The book is really only designed for those who are at least nominally pro-life. For this audience, the book is outstanding. The arguments are well put together and provide good talking points should a conversation come up. But, I really cannot see anyone, who was not pro-life managing to get through the book without being irritated. Now that I have read the book, I think I will read the Amazon reviews and find comments from those who would disagree with the author.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Noah W

    Good arguments, Sproul does a decent job exploring both sides of the issue. He presents the material in a sensitive, courteous manner so, despite the title, this book would equip the reader to address this topic even when the dialogue drifts towards "feelings." This book makes an excellent case for Christians being involved in the city gates and making a public stance against abortion and the arguments regarding "natural law" and morality are very well articulated.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Travis Rogers

    This book, while being pro-life, really takes a fresh approach to this debate. Regardless which side of the fence you stand on, one can appreciate the fact the Dr. Sproul goes out of his way to remove the strawman arguments. There simply is no place for them if one is to be taken seriously. His stance on whether or not abortion can truly be defined as murder is very interesting to say the least. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wishes to educate themselves on the topic.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Isaiah Jesch

    Dr. Sproul writes very well on this difficult topic. As one convinced of the Pro-Life position already, I appreciated his articulation of some of the key issues, arguments, and counter-points. I feel that this book is a great place to dive into the arguments surrounding what should be a key issue for Christians and pastors to consider today. The appendix contained very helpful materials as well. I consider this a good resource to have on hand and reference when needed.

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