counter create hit Our Man in Iraq - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Our Man in Iraq

Availability: Ready to download

2003: As Croatia lurches from socialism into globalized capitalism, Toni, a cocky journalist in Zagreb, struggles to balance his fragile career, pushy family, and hotheaded girlfriend. But in a moment of vulnerability he makes a mistake: volunteering his unhinged Arabic-speaking cousin Boris to report on the Iraq War. Boris begins filing Gonzo missives from the conflict zo 2003: As Croatia lurches from socialism into globalized capitalism, Toni, a cocky journalist in Zagreb, struggles to balance his fragile career, pushy family, and hotheaded girlfriend. But in a moment of vulnerability he makes a mistake: volunteering his unhinged Arabic-speaking cousin Boris to report on the Iraq War. Boris begins filing Gonzo missives from the conflict zone and Toni decides it is better to secretly rewrite his cousin’s increasingly incoherent ramblings than face up to the truth. But when Boris goes missing, Toni’s own sense of reality—and reliability—begins to unravel. Our Man In Iraq, the first of Robert Perisic’s novels to be translated into English, serves as an unforgettable introduction to a vibrant voice from Croatia. With his characteristic humor and insight, Perisic gets to the heart of life made and remade by war. "Robert Perisic depicts, with acerbic wit, a class of urban elites who are trying to reconcile their nineties rebellion with the reality of present-day Croatia. . . . The characters' snide remarks could easily sound cynical but the novel has a levity informed by the sense of social fluidity that comes with democracy." —The New Yorker "Robert Perisic is a light bright with intelligence and twinkling with irony, flashing us the news that postwar Croatia not only endures but matters."—Jonathan Franzen " . . . terrifically witty and original. . . in addition to being a delightfully acerbic primer on a literarily underrepresented part of Europe, Our Man in Iraq may well prove to be one of those rare cases where something is actually gained in translation."— The Toronto Star


Compare
Ads Banner

2003: As Croatia lurches from socialism into globalized capitalism, Toni, a cocky journalist in Zagreb, struggles to balance his fragile career, pushy family, and hotheaded girlfriend. But in a moment of vulnerability he makes a mistake: volunteering his unhinged Arabic-speaking cousin Boris to report on the Iraq War. Boris begins filing Gonzo missives from the conflict zo 2003: As Croatia lurches from socialism into globalized capitalism, Toni, a cocky journalist in Zagreb, struggles to balance his fragile career, pushy family, and hotheaded girlfriend. But in a moment of vulnerability he makes a mistake: volunteering his unhinged Arabic-speaking cousin Boris to report on the Iraq War. Boris begins filing Gonzo missives from the conflict zone and Toni decides it is better to secretly rewrite his cousin’s increasingly incoherent ramblings than face up to the truth. But when Boris goes missing, Toni’s own sense of reality—and reliability—begins to unravel. Our Man In Iraq, the first of Robert Perisic’s novels to be translated into English, serves as an unforgettable introduction to a vibrant voice from Croatia. With his characteristic humor and insight, Perisic gets to the heart of life made and remade by war. "Robert Perisic depicts, with acerbic wit, a class of urban elites who are trying to reconcile their nineties rebellion with the reality of present-day Croatia. . . . The characters' snide remarks could easily sound cynical but the novel has a levity informed by the sense of social fluidity that comes with democracy." —The New Yorker "Robert Perisic is a light bright with intelligence and twinkling with irony, flashing us the news that postwar Croatia not only endures but matters."—Jonathan Franzen " . . . terrifically witty and original. . . in addition to being a delightfully acerbic primer on a literarily underrepresented part of Europe, Our Man in Iraq may well prove to be one of those rare cases where something is actually gained in translation."— The Toronto Star

30 review for Our Man in Iraq

  1. 4 out of 5

    Susanna

    Our Man in Iraq wasn't quite what I had expected, in that I anticipated more focus on the war in Iraq and less emphasis on the daily life of Toni, the narrator, who remains in Croatia. I didn't really connect with or get into the story until around 3/4 of the way through the novel. It seemed like Toni's situation, as well as Perisic's humor, would be more understandable to those who have first-hand experience with recent Croatian history and contemporary life. The more absurd Toni's troubles got Our Man in Iraq wasn't quite what I had expected, in that I anticipated more focus on the war in Iraq and less emphasis on the daily life of Toni, the narrator, who remains in Croatia. I didn't really connect with or get into the story until around 3/4 of the way through the novel. It seemed like Toni's situation, as well as Perisic's humor, would be more understandable to those who have first-hand experience with recent Croatian history and contemporary life. The more absurd Toni's troubles got, however, the more I began to see how this could be both a poignant and a funny read. I ended up greatly enjoying the last 50 pages, so perhaps one of these days I should go back to the beginning of the book and read it in that light to see if it's improved. Disclaimer: I received my copy of this book through the First Look program in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    World Literature Today

    "Depicting a generation raised in “strange Eastern European systems” who “placed too much hope in rock ’n’ roll,” this provocative satire explores both modern Croatia and its discontents and also, like Mother Courage, the human lust for power and money that still spawns war and suffering." - Michele Levy, North Carolina A&T University This book was reviewed in the September 2013 issue of World Literature Today. Read the full review by visiting our website: http://bit.ly/1akotbp "Depicting a generation raised in “strange Eastern European systems” who “placed too much hope in rock ’n’ roll,” this provocative satire explores both modern Croatia and its discontents and also, like Mother Courage, the human lust for power and money that still spawns war and suffering." - Michele Levy, North Carolina A&T University This book was reviewed in the September 2013 issue of World Literature Today. Read the full review by visiting our website: http://bit.ly/1akotbp

  3. 4 out of 5

    Doris Pandžić

    Nevjerojatno dobra knjiga. Ne znam zašto ovo nisam pročitala prije.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Irena Kiki

    Perišiću, majstore!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marc Nash

    Video review https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTSyS... Video review https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTSyS...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fran

    It was interesting to get a perspective on the aftermath of the Balkan wars, the discombobulating transition from communism to capitalism and the "need" to make Croatia significant in world events. I finally got engaged in about the last 50 pages when the superficial gloss on Toni, the lead character, fell away.

  7. 5 out of 5

    maria

    I give out five-star ratings sparingly, but I agree with Jonathan Franzen (who provided a cover blurb) that this is a brilliant novel. The novel portrays the hipsters of Zagreb in the newly hatched republic of Croatia, and shows how globalization and other cataclysmic changes affect social relations. Robert Perisic reveals himself to be a witty observer of the zeitgeist.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chris Hays

    This was a fascinating book. On one hand, I wanted to give it the 4 stars positive for its take on the multitude of subjects it tackled. On the other it was a struggle to keep up with the various philosophies. I think the writer did a great job of portraying the cynicism evident when one tries to help other and gets screwed over. There was also a great mantra into the idea of oneself importance in the world. However, on a whole the book left me feeling wrung out for no reason as if there was a l This was a fascinating book. On one hand, I wanted to give it the 4 stars positive for its take on the multitude of subjects it tackled. On the other it was a struggle to keep up with the various philosophies. I think the writer did a great job of portraying the cynicism evident when one tries to help other and gets screwed over. There was also a great mantra into the idea of oneself importance in the world. However, on a whole the book left me feeling wrung out for no reason as if there was a lack of a climax or that some of the largest aspects of life were an after thought to the climax which happens 70% of the way through. I think it was deserving of the award on many levels and if I could that related to the protagonist, this would have been 4 stars. All in all it was not really my type of story.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jaimie Lau

    Pretty unexpected considering the title and what was promised by the blurb. The actual Iraqi war, correspondence and disappearance of Boris the "journalist" is pretty much background noise to a soap opera-esque array of actor/journalistic characters hanging around trendy places in Zagreb. Seemingly the focus in on the Western-style problems that affect the movers and shakers of Croatia after the shift from socialism to capitalism. The book actually gets quite funny when Boris's mother, Milka, ki Pretty unexpected considering the title and what was promised by the blurb. The actual Iraqi war, correspondence and disappearance of Boris the "journalist" is pretty much background noise to a soap opera-esque array of actor/journalistic characters hanging around trendy places in Zagreb. Seemingly the focus in on the Western-style problems that affect the movers and shakers of Croatia after the shift from socialism to capitalism. The book actually gets quite funny when Boris's mother, Milka, kicks up a media storm over Toni's role in her son's disappearance but it really does take a long time to get to this point. Perišić's writing style in incredibly readable and makes scenes of little consequence interesting to read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alessandro Speciale

    There are passages that make you think of a Jugoslav, post-1989 Dovlatov. But - for good or bad - things become much more serious: capitalism, it seems, is much more serious than socialism and irony isn't enough to find your way around it; the same goes for adult life and the choices it requires of all us, former rebels who've never made peace with being too adult for rebellion. As a consequence, for good or bad, the searing lightness of Dovlatov fades away in the second part of the book, making There are passages that make you think of a Jugoslav, post-1989 Dovlatov. But - for good or bad - things become much more serious: capitalism, it seems, is much more serious than socialism and irony isn't enough to find your way around it; the same goes for adult life and the choices it requires of all us, former rebels who've never made peace with being too adult for rebellion. As a consequence, for good or bad, the searing lightness of Dovlatov fades away in the second part of the book, making it more urgent and more uneven at the same time. A fascinating, complex read; highly rewarding

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chik67

    La sensazione è che questo libro, che cerca ombelicalmente tramite la narrazione di un uomo in caduta libera in una società in cui la arrampicata sociale è lo sport più praticato, sia invecchiato male. Balcani, guerra in Iraq, arrivismo. Forse letto dieci anni fa aveva un altro sapore. Oggi mostra i suoi limiti: una certa banalità di scrittura e di soluzioni narrative, una certa piattezza dei temi, uno eccessivo schiacciamento sull'attualità.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    FIRST LINE REVIEW: "Iraky peepl, Iraky peepl." Such a strange, comic novel coming out of Croatia, set at the time of the Iraq War. Just plain quirky, with huge dollops of human insight and pathos. A quick read to one of my favorite countries.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Zrinko Mršo

    skoro 5

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sanja

    Ma teraj se, Perišiću.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm

    Toni, a journalist in Zagreb and inveterate slacker, seems unable to escape his family from the south, the consequences of the war, the effects of being driven to study economics when he really wanted to focus on literature and the impacts of a combination of a desire to be too cool for words, a profound sense of insecurity and an overblown sense of responsibility for the actions of others that have an impact on him. All this means that despite being the novel’s main character, he does little to Toni, a journalist in Zagreb and inveterate slacker, seems unable to escape his family from the south, the consequences of the war, the effects of being driven to study economics when he really wanted to focus on literature and the impacts of a combination of a desire to be too cool for words, a profound sense of insecurity and an overblown sense of responsibility for the actions of others that have an impact on him. All this means that despite being the novel’s main character, he does little to drive it and instead responds to external factors. The most potent of those external factors and therefore at the heart of this story is Boris, Toni’s Arabic-speaking cousin and ‘our [his newspaper’s, on his recommendation] man in Iraq’, but the impending collapse of a regional Croatian bank has major consequences. The problem is that Boris is a major screw-up. He’s not a journalist, seems to be suffering PTSD (as it seems do many men in this post-war Croatian fictional outing, including it seems Toni), writes bizarre, stream of consciousness emails to Toni that are reworked, by Toni, to be weekly news reports of the second Iraq War. Boris’ disappearance brings his mother, Toni’s aunt and the family matriarch at odds with Toni’s (minority) branch into the mix just as Toni is suffering yet another bout of insecurity over 1) his job, 2) his friend’s money making scheme, 3) his girlfriend’s high profile success in the theatre, 4) the new guy at work and 5) pretty much everything else. If Boris is an obvious screw-up, Toni manages to hide his, for the most part, behind a self-deluding sense of cool…… Of course, it all goes wrong. In short, this book is packed full of people so many of us in and around these cultural industries are likely to recognise as types, as people we know, or perhaps as ourselves. Along the way, Perišić does a great job at dragging us into Toni’s world view so we see Markatović, the entrepreneurial friend, as slightly dodgy and continually on the make with several new schemes at any one time (until, that is, we start to work out why), Sanja (the girlfriend) as the ideal realtionship, until that is until we begin to realise just how much she has been putting up with and Milka, the matriarchal aunt, as a schemer (or highly distressed mother). Work relationships are a little less convincing, except that the types are more obvious and compelling drawn, with in some cases, such as Silva – the former model turned writer – embodying and inducing a sense of pathos. On top of this, Perišić manages to hold the things-are-going-OK line for a long time – even though the action, for the most part, takes place over five days, with an awful lot of flashback and contextualisation. It’s a great yarn – funny, tragic, sad, packed with pathos, despair and hope – with believable characters seen through the eyes of a narrator just the wrong side of holding it together making most other characters not quite right, but at times fully rational and acting coherently: Perišić’s skill in managing this complex persona is impressive. It is also a social novel, a book about the effects of the war, of the collapse of Yugoslavian socialism but without much sense of Yugonostalgia, about new entrepreneurialism, globalising economic forces, celebrity and fame, and a small Balkan state’s place in the world all wrapped up in delightfully laconic prose with a well-developed sense of the absurd. It is fantastic to see publishing houses such as Istros and vbz (depending on edition and place of purchase) publishing this and books like it. It’s not exactly a beach or lying by the pool kind of novel, but it is thoroughly engaging and compelling, partly in a car-wreck kind of way but also in a rich and layered characters kind of way. Well worth a look.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    Our Man in Iraq by Robert Perisic takes place in 2003, during those first few weeks of the Iraq War when some people still believe the war would be wrapped up and over in six weeks. Croatia is proud to be part of the “coalition of the willing” and the paper where Toni, our man in Zagreb, works wants to send their own reporter to cover the war. Toni recommends his cousin Boris, mainly because Boris speaks Arabic and partly out of family obligation. But it is not working out. Boris is sending bizar Our Man in Iraq by Robert Perisic takes place in 2003, during those first few weeks of the Iraq War when some people still believe the war would be wrapped up and over in six weeks. Croatia is proud to be part of the “coalition of the willing” and the paper where Toni, our man in Zagreb, works wants to send their own reporter to cover the war. Toni recommends his cousin Boris, mainly because Boris speaks Arabic and partly out of family obligation. But it is not working out. Boris is sending bizarre email reports that are stream of consciousness prose poems, part insight, part nonsense and utterly unusable for the paper. To cover up for his cousin and his nepotism, he rewrites the stories. But he is worried, his cousin seems to be losing touch with reality. But when Boris stops sending emails, things get worse. Toni is worried and Boris’ mother Milka is demanding explanations. Like many people, Toni ducks unpleasantness, not answering Milka’s calls. This blows up into a scandal broadcast on live TV that is both incredibly funny and devastating. I had high expectations before I even read the first page of Our Man in Iraq. After all, not that many books by Croatian authors even get translated into English, so it had to be good to cross that bar. I have an abiding interest in the Balkans since reading the incomparable Black Lamb and Grey Falcon by Rebecca West. Since then I have read several nonfiction books including Robert Kaplan’s Balkan Ghosts. As far as literature, though, i had only read The Bridge on the Drina by Nobel Laureate Ivo Andrić, a Yugoslav writer from Bosnia. Our Man in Iraq is post liberation, post war, during the early exuberant years of Croatian democracy and that excitement and freedom is important to the setting of the book. These are the first generation of people who really get to choose their destiny, or as Toni put it, “No one is obliged to inherit an identity now.” Toni’s identity as an urbane, successful member of the cultural elite is part of his downfall. The urban-rural divide separates Toni from his Aunt Milka and her worries. He takes things too lightly. Meanwhile, there are many other things happening, a bank crash, his partner’s career as an actress seems to be taking off and Toni, all too much on the surface, allows his life to spin out of control. The title, recalls the wonderful Graham Greene comic masterpiece, Our Man in Havana and set certain expectations. Our Man in Iraq was certainly bitterly funny and often very witty. It, too, is a social commentary and one about a country we seldom get to see from an insider’s view point. 3pawsOur Man in Iraq is a good book, worth reading and it offers a new perspective that we have few chances to see. However, even though the book was quite short and was well-written, I was eager to be done with it. I do not have to love the characters in the books I read, but I do have to care about them and I really did not care that much about Toni.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Extraordinary novels do more than tell a good story; they cross multiple orbits, discussing family, love, politics, money and art. What’s amazing about Robert Perisic’s “Our Man in Iraq” is that it does all of the above — while also being wickedly funny. It’s 2003 in Zagreb, Croatia, a country just beginning to stagger out of socialism and into the blinding light of capitalism. Toni, a journalist trying to put his rural past behind him, works to build a life in the big city with his beautiful gir Extraordinary novels do more than tell a good story; they cross multiple orbits, discussing family, love, politics, money and art. What’s amazing about Robert Perisic’s “Our Man in Iraq” is that it does all of the above — while also being wickedly funny. It’s 2003 in Zagreb, Croatia, a country just beginning to stagger out of socialism and into the blinding light of capitalism. Toni, a journalist trying to put his rural past behind him, works to build a life in the big city with his beautiful girlfriend. But his family ties get him into trouble when he volunteers his unstable (though Arabic-speaking) cousin Boris to cover the Iraq War. Boris’ reports read like Hunter S. Thompson’s gonzo journalism, if Thompson was a Croatian suffering PTSD from the Bosnian War. Meanwhile Toni, in order to keep his job, rewrites Boris’ reports and passes them off as truth. Soon Toni is trapped by his own fabrications and begins to lose his grip on what is real and what he’s sensationalized. It’s a brilliant exploration of the role of the media and the disgraceful, fanatical competition into which it can evolve. As if this wasn’t enough to keep our interest, there’s also the wonderfully reflective storyline of Toni and his girlfriend, Sanja, who works as an actor. Now that Sanja’s star is on the rise, Toni examines his own direction and he realizes he’s not the rebellious individual he thought he was — instead he’s just following the path of capitalism, which is leaving him empty and confused. Perisic has crafted an exquisitely textured novel: A story about the media and a small country clamoring for attention on the global stage, it is also a deeply personal tale of one man moving from one stage of life to the next, making it a great read for anyone who has ever been young, away from home or in over their head. This book was originally reviewed for The Cedar Rapids Gazette. Read more of my reviews at www.laurafarmerreviews.com

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    This was a first-reads giveaway. I wasn't sure whether to give this book a 2 star or 3 star rating. I finally decided on 3 stars because there were moments when I was pulled into the story and wanted to know more. Unfortunately, these moments were far and few in between. Our Man in Iraq is written by a Croatian author and I thought it would be really interesting to read about the Iraqi War from a different perspective, but it only had a few interesting references from their reporter in Iraq. Most This was a first-reads giveaway. I wasn't sure whether to give this book a 2 star or 3 star rating. I finally decided on 3 stars because there were moments when I was pulled into the story and wanted to know more. Unfortunately, these moments were far and few in between. Our Man in Iraq is written by a Croatian author and I thought it would be really interesting to read about the Iraqi War from a different perspective, but it only had a few interesting references from their reporter in Iraq. Mostly it was about the life of Toni, a journalist for a mediocre newspaper. Toni's life is pretty much not what he had hoped it would be, even though he lives with his actress girlfriend. His family, best friend, and job, do nothing to make his situation better, and it only gets worse when we sends his cousin to Iraq to write for the newspaper. There are times when he describes his life in Croatia that is very interesting and there is a strong political feel through the book. Though I wasn't captivated by the book others might find it a profound read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Simone Subliminalpop

    Tre conflitti nel libro di Robert Perišić: due guerre, quella attuale (nei tempi del romanzo) in Iraq e quella passata, ma con ancora grandi eredità da smaltire, dei Balcani, e un ultimo invece più sfuggente, riguardante i rapporti e i sentimenti umani. Ci sono un giornalista in caduta libera, a causa di un inviato da lui proposto disperso in Iraq, e la sua compagna invece in ascesa, bellissima attrice che sta finalmente sbocciando, ma c’è anche la Croazia attuale, una giovane nazione che vive ne Tre conflitti nel libro di Robert Perišić: due guerre, quella attuale (nei tempi del romanzo) in Iraq e quella passata, ma con ancora grandi eredità da smaltire, dei Balcani, e un ultimo invece più sfuggente, riguardante i rapporti e i sentimenti umani. Ci sono un giornalista in caduta libera, a causa di un inviato da lui proposto disperso in Iraq, e la sua compagna invece in ascesa, bellissima attrice che sta finalmente sbocciando, ma c’è anche la Croazia attuale, una giovane nazione che vive nel tentativo costante e un po’ sconclusionato (come i personaggi del libro d’altronde) di smarcarsi dal proprio passato e riposizionarsi nel futuro. Anche il risultato finale del romanzo non è del tutto centrato, ci sono degli ottimi spunti e Perišić imbastisce una storia sì interessante, ma che un po’ troppo spesso si sfalda, preferendo il “piccolo quotidiano” al “quadro generale”. http://www.subliminalpop.com/?p=6945

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ericka Clouther

    The novel takes place in Zagreb, Croatia, and one thing that really stands out about this novel is how Croatia seems both completely foreign and very familiar at the same time. Parts of it could definitely take place in Brooklyn instead of Zagreb. The economic and career fear in particular is very familiar and relevant in America right now. The translation appears seamless and I mostly forgot it was in translation even in the scenes where the characters speak English. The beginning of the novel The novel takes place in Zagreb, Croatia, and one thing that really stands out about this novel is how Croatia seems both completely foreign and very familiar at the same time. Parts of it could definitely take place in Brooklyn instead of Zagreb. The economic and career fear in particular is very familiar and relevant in America right now. The translation appears seamless and I mostly forgot it was in translation even in the scenes where the characters speak English. The beginning of the novel is a little crazed, but it settles in to an interesting and fairly straightforward narrative. Definitely worth reading. Full disclosure: My husband signed a contract with Black Balloon Publishing. Read my other reviews here: http://booksmyfatherread.blogspot.com/

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Kopsiaftis

    For my first foray into Croatian modern literature, this wasn't bad. Most interesting was getting a new perspective on how the rest of the world views our wars in Iraq as well as the perspective of someone who bore witness to the change from socialism to capitalism; despite what most Americans might think (especially those whose only understanding of socialism is a gag reflex) he reveals that capitalism brings forth its own problems and can't be viewed as a panacea for all. The protagonist is wi For my first foray into Croatian modern literature, this wasn't bad. Most interesting was getting a new perspective on how the rest of the world views our wars in Iraq as well as the perspective of someone who bore witness to the change from socialism to capitalism; despite what most Americans might think (especially those whose only understanding of socialism is a gag reflex) he reveals that capitalism brings forth its own problems and can't be viewed as a panacea for all. The protagonist is witty and engaging, but I would fault the book in that it doesn't quite deliver the same pull in terms of plot.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    A bit rough but saved by its exuberance, and also its foreignness. This is not a novel by an American about life in postwar Croatia during the early 21st century—the voice is deeply rooted there. The author's smart, cynical sociology and history, it turns out, are the story, not just part of it, and that makes what otherwise might be a bit of a shaggy dog story into an interesting portrait of a time and place, as well as its people. The pace is punky-pogo-y, there are drugs and sex and post-soci A bit rough but saved by its exuberance, and also its foreignness. This is not a novel by an American about life in postwar Croatia during the early 21st century—the voice is deeply rooted there. The author's smart, cynical sociology and history, it turns out, are the story, not just part of it, and that makes what otherwise might be a bit of a shaggy dog story into an interesting portrait of a time and place, as well as its people. The pace is punky-pogo-y, there are drugs and sex and post-socialist ennui, but Perisic has the good sense not to take the feel-good way out. This was fun, and definitely worth a read—especially for a perspective you're not likely to get elsewhere.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Natalia

    Loved this edgy, sad, funny novel that gets to the abyss and doesn't flinch. The precise, very quick and original observations are what made the reading unique, along with the way that war is depicted in all its insanity through emails that may or may not be from the front lines. An accurate way of presenting our endless involvement in the Mideast, considering that we also only understand or misunderstand the war through distant correspondents. Deeply felt satire. I'm really thrilled that Robert Loved this edgy, sad, funny novel that gets to the abyss and doesn't flinch. The precise, very quick and original observations are what made the reading unique, along with the way that war is depicted in all its insanity through emails that may or may not be from the front lines. An accurate way of presenting our endless involvement in the Mideast, considering that we also only understand or misunderstand the war through distant correspondents. Deeply felt satire. I'm really thrilled that Robert Perisic will be reading at Sunday Salon Chicago in April!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Moira Downey

    In what I can't help but read as a spin on Graham Greene's Our Man in Havana, our protagonist Toni finds himself not abroad, but rather at home in Croatia, furiously editing dispatches from his PTSD-riddled and increasingly incoherent cousin into readable reporting on the American invasion of Iraq. Perišić takes a keen look at a still fluid, post-conflict Croatian society partially through the lens of its reaction to newly minted conflict in yet another part of the world.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Narendra

    Croatia described through the eyes of a liberal arts drop out, who has largely nihilistic observations. His nihilistic tendencies predate the "separation wars" when Croatia became independent of Yugoslavia. Croatian attitudes and mores from personal and familial to global events are cleverly woven to spin an interesting tale. Enjoyable read, but does the protagonist really have to consume so much controlled substances to have fun?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I bought this to read in advance of a trip to Zagreb. I wish I had managed to read it before the trip, because it gives a view of Zagreb and Croatia in general that I didn’t get when I was there. The book is a satire about young hipsters in Zagreb, trying to figure out how to hustle and climb in a newly capitalistic society. It’s quite witty and sharp.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Took me a little while to get into this book which is about Croatia and the Balkan wars, and only about Iraq in author's views of impact of war on society. Another significant theme is impact of end of "communism" in Yugoslavia. There is a great deal of humor, both bitter and not, in the book. I found myself really liking the main character and his girlfriend, even liking his crazy family.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    The story of a Croatian journalist who gets in over his head making up stories on behalf of the cousin who he sent to be witness to the 2003 invasion of Iraq. The stakes are low: he struggles to keep his friends, his job, and his girl. It's fun and uniquely Croatian: at least a few characters seem like they could only have lived in Croatia in 2003.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Larry Snyder

    25% through it couldn't hold my interest so I put it down. Felt like the translation was just a little off, like in each sentence some of the original humor/slang/irony/wit was lost but you couldn't quite tell what.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sara Habein

    Really glad that I finally read this. Darkly funny look at the spectacle of media cycles in a newly capitalist country.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.