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Nightmare Magazine 1: October 2012

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Nightmare is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In its pages you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales to visceral psychological horror. For our debut issue we will be bringing you four all-new, never before published horror stories: “Property Condemned” by Jonathan Maberry, “Frontier Death Song” by Laird Barron, “Good F Nightmare is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In its pages you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales to visceral psychological horror. For our debut issue we will be bringing you four all-new, never before published horror stories: “Property Condemned” by Jonathan Maberry, “Frontier Death Song” by Laird Barron, “Good Fences” by Genevieve Valentine, and “Afterlife” by Sarah Langan. We'll also have author spotlights with each of our authors, a showcase on our cover artist Jeff Simpson, as well as an in-depth feature interview with horror legend Peter Straub. And finally we'll have the first installment of “The H Word,” a monthly column which will focus on exploring the many facets of the field of horror.


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Nightmare is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In its pages you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales to visceral psychological horror. For our debut issue we will be bringing you four all-new, never before published horror stories: “Property Condemned” by Jonathan Maberry, “Frontier Death Song” by Laird Barron, “Good F Nightmare is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In its pages you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales to visceral psychological horror. For our debut issue we will be bringing you four all-new, never before published horror stories: “Property Condemned” by Jonathan Maberry, “Frontier Death Song” by Laird Barron, “Good Fences” by Genevieve Valentine, and “Afterlife” by Sarah Langan. We'll also have author spotlights with each of our authors, a showcase on our cover artist Jeff Simpson, as well as an in-depth feature interview with horror legend Peter Straub. And finally we'll have the first installment of “The H Word,” a monthly column which will focus on exploring the many facets of the field of horror.

30 review for Nightmare Magazine 1: October 2012

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Tallen

    This contains a fantastic story (Frontier Death Song) by Laird Barron, one of my favourites from Laird. I've read it and also listened to the excellent audio version. The story will appear in Laird's next collection called 'Swift To Chase', which is scheduled for publication by JournalStone. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael Adams

    Intriguing story of monsters told through the lens of the wild hunt mythology. It is a story of bleak survival and ice-cold revenge in the frozen landscape of Alaska and the northern continental US.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    I am thrilled by the stories and the editorials in this magazine. Every story is interesting and well-written, while the two editorials offer some thoughtful musings about the horror genre. RJ Sevin's editorial, "The H-Word," is a fantastic piece about the state of the horror genre and its future in publishing. The stories: they kicked my ass. I read them in order and I spaced them out to give each its own space in my head. Laird Barron's "Frontier Death Song" was a wonderful combination of splat I am thrilled by the stories and the editorials in this magazine. Every story is interesting and well-written, while the two editorials offer some thoughtful musings about the horror genre. RJ Sevin's editorial, "The H-Word," is a fantastic piece about the state of the horror genre and its future in publishing. The stories: they kicked my ass. I read them in order and I spaced them out to give each its own space in my head. Laird Barron's "Frontier Death Song" was a wonderful combination of splatterpunk and myth. He nails the atmosphere and constructs a creepy story. Sarah Langan's "Afterlife" goes straight for the supernatural and then slowly draws you into a woman's bizarre and sad life. I haven't read anything by Langan since I plowed through "The Keeper" a few years back; now I want to pick up more, she's so good. This magazine was definitely a highlight of my October horror reads--and I am definitely subscribing to future issues.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Wit

    It took me a while to remember that I had read the first book in the series this is a prequel to. I liked this one, it was nicely done and tied in with what I remember if the first book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Corinne

    Only have Afterlife by Sarah Langan want to read based on this comment in a Lucy Taylor interview "For me a great story is one with multiple levels, where the horror increases exponentially as new facets of the character and his/her true situation is more accurately revealed. A great story leaves me gasping and breathless, wanting to immediately sit down and read it again to savor every nuance and subtlety. I could name dozens, but the one that immediately comes to mind is "Afterlife" by Sarah Lan Only have Afterlife by Sarah Langan want to read based on this comment in a Lucy Taylor interview "For me a great story is one with multiple levels, where the horror increases exponentially as new facets of the character and his/her true situation is more accurately revealed. A great story leaves me gasping and breathless, wanting to immediately sit down and read it again to savor every nuance and subtlety. I could name dozens, but the one that immediately comes to mind is "Afterlife" by Sarah Langan, Nightmare Magazine October 2012." http://www.nightmare-magazine.com/fic...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Maximiliano Curia

    Interesting magazine. Not all the short tales are up to the bar, though.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Richard Leis

    I'm reading the most recent issues of Nightmare Magazine and also going back to the beginning to read every issue. "Property Condemned" by Jonathan Maberry is a great standalone story set in (according to the interview with Maberry in this issue) the same town where some of his other stories and novels take place. Not having read anything else by the writer, I really appreciated how well this story worked and how chilling it turned out to be. The action begins like the best Amblin productions: fo I'm reading the most recent issues of Nightmare Magazine and also going back to the beginning to read every issue. "Property Condemned" by Jonathan Maberry is a great standalone story set in (according to the interview with Maberry in this issue) the same town where some of his other stories and novels take place. Not having read anything else by the writer, I really appreciated how well this story worked and how chilling it turned out to be. The action begins like the best Amblin productions: four kids on bikes heading toward what they think is a haunted house. Where it ends up is much darker, though, and much more Stephen King than Steven Spielberg. In the interview with the writer, I learned something I didn't know about the psychology of abused children, and it actually lends to the story a tiny, grudging element of hope where at first I only saw hopelessness. As a reader who unfortunately understands a little too well what the protagonist suffers at the hands of his father, the story resonates and gives me a lot to think about. "Frontier Death Song" by Laird Barron is a gory chase story that leads from Alaska to the East Coast while the protagonist flees a being he probably shouldn't have messed with in the first place. There is a lot of tension and horror to contend with and the pace is nonstop. I especially like the elements that seemed Lovecraftian in a story that already works well with the mythology it's updating. The ending is horrifying and satisfying, although I was left with a few questions I don't think were answered, including what it was the protagonist had done (prior to the events of the story) to lead to this fate. "Good Fences" by Genevieve Valentine is vivid psychological horror centered around a burning car and an increasingly paranoid, isolated, and perhaps insane city resident. The horror is in inaction and cowardice bred by apathy. The story is dreamlike and surreal, but ultimately I don't think it matters if these things are really happening or if it is all in the protagonist's head; it is horrifying no matter what the reading (which is something the writer points out in her interview.) My favorite story in an issue of great stories is "Afterlife" by Sarah Langan. Like the previous story, there is some question to the protagonist's sanity, though I think Langan clearly suggests the supernatural elements are really happening (and she says as much in her interview.) The horror is Grey Gardens-like–a daughter and her mother trapped in their home by mental illness, social anxiety, physical and emotional abuse, and poverty–with supernatural elements that offer the protagonist moments of great heroism. What is so horrifying about the story is not the ghosts but how they ended up there, their choice between fates, and how this parallels the protagonist's situation with her mother. The labelled jars are going to give me nightmares... Fantastic issue! Final note: to truly appreciate Jeff Simpson's art spotlighted in the issue, these must be viewed on a big color screen. http://www.nightmare-magazine.com/non...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristopher Kelly

    What a great debut issue of a promising magazine! I also enjoyed listening to the podcasts for two of the four fiction pieces (if you want something to listen to this Halloween, I'd highly recommend going to iTunes or wherever great podcasts are available and downloading the Tales to Terrify episode from this week, featuring Laird Barron's story, "Frontier Death Song"--the reading and the story are both a lot of creepy fun). The interviews with the authors seemed a little cursory (I've enjoyed i What a great debut issue of a promising magazine! I also enjoyed listening to the podcasts for two of the four fiction pieces (if you want something to listen to this Halloween, I'd highly recommend going to iTunes or wherever great podcasts are available and downloading the Tales to Terrify episode from this week, featuring Laird Barron's story, "Frontier Death Song"--the reading and the story are both a lot of creepy fun). The interviews with the authors seemed a little cursory (I've enjoyed interviews of this nature a little better in One Story, for example), and I'm looking forward to the column discussing the horror genre digging deeper in the coming months; this issue's defense of horror is fine, but it also makes points Peter Straub has been making for decades. Overall, however, this magazine is exactly what I want showing up at my door every month. The standout stories in this issue for me are definitely Barron's aforementioned "Frontier Death Song," about a man chased by some nasty heavies from the Alaskan wilds (Barron himself raced the Iditarod three times, and his authority over such material here is a real benefit), and also Sarah Langan's "Afterlife," which is a clear lock for inclusion in any self-respecting anthology of the year's best horror. "Afterlife" tells the story of a woman, trapped in her abusive mother's house for forty-plus years, trying to convince the ghosts in the attic to move on before it's too late. The gift for grim, inspired details in Langan's story reminded me a lot of the same quality I loved so much in Katherine Dunn's Geek Love. The other two stories were good, but they weren't quite knockouts for me, but I'm sure there are people who will like them better. What's nice about the magazine as a whole is that it found four distinct voices to highlight the potential range of this great genre. Can't wait for the next issue!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vandrolyn

    I don't feel like writing a long, review so instead I'll give a quick shoutout to the stories with a little blurb attached. "Property Condemned" by Johnathan Maberry: I thought this was going to be the generic "kids go into a haunted, spooky house" fare according to the first few pages. Christ, was I wrong. Lots of realistic adult fears and unwanted feels to be found here. 7/10 "Frontier Death Song" by Laird Barron: My favorite. Do you like Norse mythology? Do you know anything about the wild hunt I don't feel like writing a long, review so instead I'll give a quick shoutout to the stories with a little blurb attached. "Property Condemned" by Johnathan Maberry: I thought this was going to be the generic "kids go into a haunted, spooky house" fare according to the first few pages. Christ, was I wrong. Lots of realistic adult fears and unwanted feels to be found here. 7/10 "Frontier Death Song" by Laird Barron: My favorite. Do you like Norse mythology? Do you know anything about the wild hunt of Norse mythology? If you answered yes to any of those questions, FDS is for you. The atmosphere and shit-out-of-luck protagonist were well written for such a short story. The final twist got me good despite the author claiming it was a "happy, upbeat ending". 8/10 "Good Fences" by Genevieve Valentine (cool name imo): An absolute mindfuck of a story. Good Fences, in comparison of the latter stories, takes a more vague, realistic, and psychologically horrifying approach to its brand of horror. Don't trust anything this story shows or tells you. 7/10 "Afterlife" by Sarah Langan: I like Langan's work, I really do. But this felt like the weakest of the quadtruplet set of stories. This one has ghost children, the (possibly?) mentally unstable, and cruel parents. Somehow, with all these elements, the story kinda had a build-up to a weak end with a predictable twist. 5/10 That's my piece. Make sure to read the essay, "The H Word: The Other Scarlet Letter" by R.J Sevin if you want a little sampling about the past, present, and future of horror literature.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    I loved the articles, the author interviews, the art and the stories! My only disappointment is that I can't hold this magazine in my hand. It appears to only be an on line production. I understand the financial reasoning behind that decision but it still makes me a little sad. Johnathan Maberry never falls short of my expectations and his story was the perfect beginning to the premier issue of Nightmare Magazine. R.J. Sevins commentary about the nature of horror was spot on and gave me great ho I loved the articles, the author interviews, the art and the stories! My only disappointment is that I can't hold this magazine in my hand. It appears to only be an on line production. I understand the financial reasoning behind that decision but it still makes me a little sad. Johnathan Maberry never falls short of my expectations and his story was the perfect beginning to the premier issue of Nightmare Magazine. R.J. Sevins commentary about the nature of horror was spot on and gave me great hope in the future of this on line magazine. I look forward to seeing many more issues and as soon as I finish singing these particular praises, I am on my way to put in my subscription. Truly a wonderful Halloween gift!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fantasy Literature

    John Joseph Adams, editor of the well-regarded science fiction and fantasy e-journal, Lightspeed, as well as numerous excellent anthologies, has launched a new horror e-zine, Nightmare. It will feature two reprint stories along with two original stories each month, along with in-depth interviews, short interviews with each author whose story is featured in the issue, and non-fiction discussions about writing and reading horror. The first issue is out today, and it is terrific. I’m an early... Rea John Joseph Adams, editor of the well-regarded science fiction and fantasy e-journal, Lightspeed, as well as numerous excellent anthologies, has launched a new horror e-zine, Nightmare. It will feature two reprint stories along with two original stories each month, along with in-depth interviews, short interviews with each author whose story is featured in the issue, and non-fiction discussions about writing and reading horror. The first issue is out today, and it is terrific. I’m an early... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/fant...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    So I have been curious about reading horror for a little while now, because it had been so long for me. I really liked the stories in this first issue (especially the first two) but I thought the nonfiction section about the horror genre was especially thought provoking. It is true that horror is more meant as a "bad thing" rather than just a description of the genre. I hadn't considered that angle before, and actually felt kind of weird at first about reading horror at all.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Nightmare Magazine is a dream come true! Great stories, artwork, and interviews make up this periodical for the horror fan. Laird Barron's story proved once again why he is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors. It is terrifying! I also enjoyed the other stories, and plan to read more of the authors' works. Definitely don't miss the essay on the "H" word. I look forward to the next edition!

  14. 4 out of 5

    R.J.K. Lee

    Great mix of stories, art, non-fiction, and interviews with the authors. Felt a bit on the short side (4 stories) but that may be because the stories had me reading so fast. My favorite was probably the first story about the house. Excited enough about the direction of this to start subscribing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Great selection of stories in the first issue of this magazine.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Camp

    Jonathan Maberry's contribution makes this a solid debut for this sister to Lightspeed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Loved the look at Crow, Val and Terry as kids. Is an overall sad story cause it shows that Crow is setup to have a hard life.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ofelia Gränd

  19. 5 out of 5

    Devan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lilhop

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kiersten

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adam Colclough

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tim Salay

  24. 4 out of 5

    ~~*Julie Kawalec-pearson

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ofelia

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tuttle

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lloyd-Billington

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anthmv

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