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The six novels collected in The War of the Worlds and Other Science Fiction Classics were all written at the turn of the twentieth century, and with them Wells helped to lay the foundations of modern science fiction. The Time Machine The Island of Dr. Moreau The Invisible Man The War of the Worlds The First Men in the Moon The Food of the Gods


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The six novels collected in The War of the Worlds and Other Science Fiction Classics were all written at the turn of the twentieth century, and with them Wells helped to lay the foundations of modern science fiction. The Time Machine The Island of Dr. Moreau The Invisible Man The War of the Worlds The First Men in the Moon The Food of the Gods

30 review for War of the Worlds and other Science Fiction Classics

  1. 5 out of 5

    David Cooke

    It is apparent after reading this collection why H.G. Wells is revered as one of the founding fathers of science fiction. However, as with any short story collection, some stories are more successful than others. The Time Machine: As a short story, this is probably the most complete. It captures well HG Wells' concerns about humanity, commercialism, knowledge, etc. through a thoroughly engaging story. The Island of Dr. Moreau: The worst story in the collection by far, this builds off the hubbub su It is apparent after reading this collection why H.G. Wells is revered as one of the founding fathers of science fiction. However, as with any short story collection, some stories are more successful than others. The Time Machine: As a short story, this is probably the most complete. It captures well HG Wells' concerns about humanity, commercialism, knowledge, etc. through a thoroughly engaging story. The Island of Dr. Moreau: The worst story in the collection by far, this builds off the hubbub surrounding Darwin's theories and foreshadows genetic engineering. However, the science is so faulty that it is hard to get past the ridiculousness. War of the Worlds: The first half the story is much more successful than the second, and it has a bit of Dickensian miraculousness at the end, but the aliens he creates in the story are surprisingly non-humanoid, and he does get into the challenges of an alien invasion. The invasion is a pretty stupendous read - I just didn't feel like it kept the momentum going very well. First Men in the Moon: This is the flip side of War of the Worlds for me, telling the story of a human invasion. The science behind how they achieve space travel is absolutely unusual and fascinating, and while physically it doesn't really make sense, it is just a conceptually elegant and wacky idea...in some ways, science fiction at its best. The aliens are in many ways less interesting to me than those of War of the Worlds, but the concepts of communication are expanded upon much more. He also really goes after some of the consumerism/scientism battles that feature in The Time Machine and Food of the Gods. The multiple, episodic endings wore on me a bit, but it was still a fun read. Food of the Gods: This foretells the challenges of genetically modified foods or synthetic biology and, in general, what happens when technology can get ahead of the scientists who create it. It also deals with government intervention, how scientists differ from both engineers and the human race (although a bit of a narrow, cliche look), and all sorts of other social stuff in addition to the sci-fi angle. Unfortunately, the implications of the technology aren't that great (kind of as bad as Dr. Moreau), but all of the stuff around it is interesting. Overall, I definitely recommend reading some of his works, especially First Men in the Moon and The Time Machine. It's fascinating to see how forward-thinking some of this stuff really was.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brian Burden

    Like the best SF The War Of The Worlds is worked out to a logical plan but appeals equally to the intellect and the unconscious. HG cycled round the parts of the home counties where he set the action, planning death and destruction. Bicycles were a relatively new form of transport, and cyclists considered themselves kings of the road. (I strongly recommend Wells's novel The Wheels Of Chance, written at much the same time, which describes how an apprentice in a drapery store saves up to buy one o Like the best SF The War Of The Worlds is worked out to a logical plan but appeals equally to the intellect and the unconscious. HG cycled round the parts of the home counties where he set the action, planning death and destruction. Bicycles were a relatively new form of transport, and cyclists considered themselves kings of the road. (I strongly recommend Wells's novel The Wheels Of Chance, written at much the same time, which describes how an apprentice in a drapery store saves up to buy one of these wonderful machines and embarks on a holiday full of adventure, romance, and comic incident.) The novel has three themes: The invasion of the 19th century by the 20th: The Martians deploy heat rays and suffocating "black smoke". Just a few years later, soldiers in the trenches would have to contend with flame-throwers and chlorine gas. The actual heat rays arrived later, in the form of lasers. The second theme concerns the effect of the invasion on human relationships. The narrator never anticipates that he will find himself obliged to commit murder, let alone murder a clergyman. In particular, the narrator's marriage is affected. He becomes separated from his wife not long after the invasion begins, and believes her dead until the closing chapters, when there is a joyous reunion. There is a subtext here relating to Wells's own first marriage with his cousin Isobel. Wells discovered early on that they were sexually incompatible and took up with his young student Amy Robbins, cohabiting with her while writing what would prove to be his first bestseller, The Time Machine, and marrying her as soon as his divorce came through. Even so, he loved Isobel very much and dreamed of a reconciliation. I'm sure Wells chose his words precisely when, at the end of the novel, the husband and wife who had believed each other dead meet unexpectedly in their deserted marital home and the wife's first words are "I came..." The third theme is a Jungian one. The Martians represent mankind's shadow self. The narrator's first sight of a Martian in the darkness of the recently opened cylinder is a pair of glowing eyes. In Jungian dream analysis, glowing eyes in the dark represent confrontation with the aspects of one's psyche one is least willing to acknowledge. The Martians seem entirely alien - boneless, octopus-like creatures - yet the narrator speculates that in the distant past they evolved from man-like beings, creatures, deprived by technology over the centuries of both humanity and beauty of form. According to Jung, such a dream confrontation may result in the dreamer being severely burnt (See C.G.Jung: Flying Saucers A Modern Myth Of Things Seen In The Sky). Wells would have been unacquainted with Jung's work back in 1897, but he seems to be saying in this novel that war comes from Man's shadow self. Well-paced and full of action and incident and invention, the novel works on a subliminal level to pack a powerful punch.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This omnibus is perfect for a first-time reader of Well's novels, however, the collection was *not* for me. The editor of this collection has taken six brilliant novels, and condensed them into short-story format, going so far as to remove entire chapters, scenes, dialogue, etc. and trying to add superfluous, choppy information that was not originally in the stories in order to fill out a poor facsimile. This is an inferior abridgement. Readers deserve wholesome material, not literary pap, and that This omnibus is perfect for a first-time reader of Well's novels, however, the collection was *not* for me. The editor of this collection has taken six brilliant novels, and condensed them into short-story format, going so far as to remove entire chapters, scenes, dialogue, etc. and trying to add superfluous, choppy information that was not originally in the stories in order to fill out a poor facsimile. This is an inferior abridgement. Readers deserve wholesome material, not literary pap, and that's what this omnibus has made of these classics. In short, this is something you could gift your high-schooler, but if you hope to curl up with the original works of Wells, look elsewhere! (Note: I was able to add unabridged editions of a few of these novels ["The Time Machine", "War of the Worlds", and "The Invisible Man"] for *free* from the Google Play Store)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    Six stories made famous for their early (1800's) sci-fi influencers...but made more remarkable for the political, environmental and social messaging in each. Did anyone else read Food of the Gods and think about the ripple effects of DDT or Rachel Carson?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    This was definitely one of the best books I've ever read! Every story was interesting and unique.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Great collection of six hugely influential works. Wells' novels are one of the foundations of modern science fiction. The Food of the Gods and The First Men in the Moon are weaker than the other four, but all are worth reading. This has everything - time travel, space travel, alien encounters, evil experiments. All have a touch of social commentary about Victorian England that's still relevant today, but all can be read and enjoyed as straight sci-fi adventure stories.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Boulware

    /* As an avid Sci-Fi reader and follower, I've loved H. G. Wells, Isaac Asimov, Jules Vern, Edgar Allen Poe, and many of the greats as far back as the day that I began to pick up books! This particular edition is an excellent addition to my collection. I would recommend that you make it yours as well. These stories are time encompassing classics that will never die. Till next time... Greg. "Twitter" https://twitter.com/#!/AuthorBoulwareG */ /* As an avid Sci-Fi reader and follower, I've loved H. G. Wells, Isaac Asimov, Jules Vern, Edgar Allen Poe, and many of the greats as far back as the day that I began to pick up books! This particular edition is an excellent addition to my collection. I would recommend that you make it yours as well. These stories are time encompassing classics that will never die. Till next time... Greg. "Twitter" https://twitter.com/#!/AuthorBoulwareG */

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    The Time Machine (Pending) The Island of Dr. Moreau (read 6/25/16-6/26/16) ★★★✰✰ The Invisible Man (Pending) The War of the Worlds (Pending) The First Men in the Moon (Pending) The Food of the Gods (Pending) The Time Machine (Pending) The Island of Dr. Moreau (read 6/25/16-6/26/16) ★★★✰✰ The Invisible Man (Pending) The War of the Worlds (Pending) The First Men in the Moon (Pending) The Food of the Gods (Pending)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I've unfortunately lost the well loved edition I had as a kid, but between H.G. Wells and Edgar Allen Poe, it's a tight tie to say which was my favorite as a child. I reread their stories feverishly. These stories are classic.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Dau

    A very well rounded collection of science fiction.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Great compilation of HG Wells science fiction. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jill

  14. 5 out of 5

    Austin Bunton

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Yunginger

  16. 5 out of 5

    Will

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tom Batalias

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Brinkley

  19. 5 out of 5

    Will M

  20. 4 out of 5

    William

  21. 5 out of 5

    Diane Hill

  22. 5 out of 5

    Manny

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brett Heller

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kris

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Tanner

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Nguyen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Constructionv4

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  30. 5 out of 5

    roberta meister

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