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Fatale, Vol. 2: The Devil's Business

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In 1970s Los Angeles, Josephine can't hide from the forces of Hollywood, Satanic Cults and creepy 16mm films collected by wealthy deviants. And when a struggling actor and his wounded friend cross her path, all hell will break loose, leaving ripples that echo all the way to modern time, where Nicolas Lash falls deeper into Josephine's spell. Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips' In 1970s Los Angeles, Josephine can't hide from the forces of Hollywood, Satanic Cults and creepy 16mm films collected by wealthy deviants. And when a struggling actor and his wounded friend cross her path, all hell will break loose, leaving ripples that echo all the way to modern time, where Nicolas Lash falls deeper into Josephine's spell. Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips' best-selling series just gets hotter! Collecting: Fatale 6-10


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In 1970s Los Angeles, Josephine can't hide from the forces of Hollywood, Satanic Cults and creepy 16mm films collected by wealthy deviants. And when a struggling actor and his wounded friend cross her path, all hell will break loose, leaving ripples that echo all the way to modern time, where Nicolas Lash falls deeper into Josephine's spell. Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips' In 1970s Los Angeles, Josephine can't hide from the forces of Hollywood, Satanic Cults and creepy 16mm films collected by wealthy deviants. And when a struggling actor and his wounded friend cross her path, all hell will break loose, leaving ripples that echo all the way to modern time, where Nicolas Lash falls deeper into Josephine's spell. Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips' best-selling series just gets hotter! Collecting: Fatale 6-10

30 review for Fatale, Vol. 2: The Devil's Business

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    Time for Round two! Book two takes us away from 50's to a new decade: The dashing 70's! Experience the glamor and the ....uh.. tentacles? Following the footsteps of book one, the story jumps back and forth between two timelines: 2012 and 1970. In 2012, Nicholas Nash is still trying to figure out what the hell is happening to him and around him. He seems to be chasing old ghosts and running away from new ones. But 70's is where things are going down. While last book's major characters were fro Time for Round two! Book two takes us away from 50's to a new decade: The dashing 70's! Experience the glamor and the ....uh.. tentacles? Following the footsteps of book one, the story jumps back and forth between two timelines: 2012 and 1970. In 2012, Nicholas Nash is still trying to figure out what the hell is happening to him and around him. He seems to be chasing old ghosts and running away from new ones. But 70's is where things are going down. While last book's major characters were from police department and journalism background, Ed Brubaker shakes things up and introduce us to the grand film industry of America. Miles, a b-grade actor, and his friend Suzie were on the run from an evil cult/church when they literally dropped into our enigmatic heroine's lap. Josephine had been keeping a low profile and generally staying away from the world as well as men for her and their sake. But that changes now. The first two chapters were really fun. I actually thought this was going to be better than the first book, but then again, I found Brubaker's last act was basically a retracing of first volume's footsteps. Nevertheless, The last act did offer a satisfying conclusion to the 70s story arc and I am satisfied with the whole thing. While the art and writing were excellent as usual, it's was repetitive in certain parts. So did it blow my mind? Hey, stop looking me like that. If Ed Brubaker can use the same plot points, I should be able to use the same jokes too!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Having recently been reminded just how good Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips can be with their latest Criminal run, I wanted MORE! So I went back to revisit one of their few titles that I’ve read almost nothing of because the first book didn’t click for me: Fatale. Lovecraftian horror meets classic LA noir - how could it be anything but a hit, right? And yet… Nope! Just like the first Fatale book, the second was plain bad! So this is the part where I usually try to summarise the plot - and that’s p Having recently been reminded just how good Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips can be with their latest Criminal run, I wanted MORE! So I went back to revisit one of their few titles that I’ve read almost nothing of because the first book didn’t click for me: Fatale. Lovecraftian horror meets classic LA noir - how could it be anything but a hit, right? And yet… Nope! Just like the first Fatale book, the second was plain bad! So this is the part where I usually try to summarise the plot - and that’s part of the problem: I wasn’t totally sure what was happening! There’s a snuff film doing the rounds and people are after it and there’s a Satanic cult doing stuff and want our heroine - though I’m not sure why she’s that either - for a ritual to do something. Ugh. Besides the occasional murder of a non-character, nothing much happens for the vast majority of the book. Characters bumbling around, talking moodily - it’s not interesting at all. I have no idea why Josephine is involved in any of this seeing as she doesn’t seem to do anything but sit in her house smoking and watching old movies - this is why I wonder why she’s the title character given how passive, unmotivated and boring she is! Like all the characters, she’s a total yawner to read about and her romance with the failed actor was forced and unconvincing. My bafflement was only further underlined in the final act when she clutches a book saying that she was now saved. What?! Maybe it was established in the first Fatale what that book was and how it relates to her but it’s been seven years since I read Volume 1 and I was completely lost! The Satanic cult/Lovecraftian mumbo-jumbo was as corny as a Hammer horror but totally unoriginal and bland. They’re evil and they’re out to do evil things because evil - I dunno, take over the world or something stupid like that. Brubaker simply doesn’t write horror well and it’s not a good fit alongside his normal brand of crime noir fiction. The noir is cliched and unpleasant for the sake of being unpleasant. If you want to read about the sinister machinations of old Hollywood, this very same creative team did it way better in The Fade Out. Sean Phillips’ art is the book’s only saving grace and it’s dependably strong, particularly coupled with Dave Stewart’s colours. Unfortunately though, while the Brubaker/Phillips partnership is one of comic’s finest creative teams, they’re not immune from putting out the occasional pile of crap which Fatale, Volume 2: The Devil’s Business definitely is.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jan Philipzig

    Fatale is probably the weakest Brubaker series I’ve read so far, though I have not read much of his superhero stuff. Its leading lady is supposed to be temptation personified, but I am afraid she leaves me rather cold. The whole mystery that surrounds her just does not grab me, especially all that by-the-numbers evil cult mumbo jumbo. That being said, the series is still head and shoulders above your average comic book out there: great dialogue, moody artwork that perfectly captures the story’s Fatale is probably the weakest Brubaker series I’ve read so far, though I have not read much of his superhero stuff. Its leading lady is supposed to be temptation personified, but I am afraid she leaves me rather cold. The whole mystery that surrounds her just does not grab me, especially all that by-the-numbers evil cult mumbo jumbo. That being said, the series is still head and shoulders above your average comic book out there: great dialogue, moody artwork that perfectly captures the story’s melancholic tone, several fascinating minor characters, countless memorable details. We also get more noir and less Lovecraftian horror than in the first volume – a trend that plays to the strengths of both writer and artist (though the Lovecraftian elements no longer feel quite as stiff and out of place here). Last but not least, I really enjoyed this volume’s sleazy 1970’s setting! Bottom line: even the most flawed Brubaker effort is well worth checking out.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    [image error] Introduction: After reading Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ fantastic first volume of “Fatale,” I just knew that I struck gold when I picked up this graphic novel series and I was dying to read more from this series! So, that is why I picked up the second volume “Fatale: The Devil’s Business: Book Two” and man was it just as exciting and frightening as the first volume! What is this story about? In this volume, Nicolas Lash continues to search for more clues about the mysteri [image error] Introduction: After reading Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ fantastic first volume of “Fatale,” I just knew that I struck gold when I picked up this graphic novel series and I was dying to read more from this series! So, that is why I picked up the second volume “Fatale: The Devil’s Business: Book Two” and man was it just as exciting and frightening as the first volume! What is this story about? In this volume, Nicolas Lash continues to search for more clues about the mysterious beautiful woman Josephine, as she has ties to his deceased relative Dominic Raines and he is more determined than ever to discover Josephine’s secret identity. Meanwhile, part of the story flash back to the late 1970s as Josephine tries to hide herself from the world as she believes that any man that comes near her always suffer a gruesome fate. Unfortunately, when a former star actor named Miles finds out that his friend Suzy had murdered Brother Stane at a Method Church party, he unknowingly runs to Josephine’s house and begs her to save Suzy from the Satanic Cult of the Method Church, which is led by none other than Hansel, the devil from the first book being reborn in another body. Can Miles and Josephine escape the clutches of Hansel? Read this book to find out! What I loved about this story: Ed Brubaker’s writing: Wow! Can I just say that this volume was just as intense and exciting as the first volume? Yes I can! Ed Brubaker has really outdone himself in this volume as the story is full of drama, horror and forbidden love and these elements all mingle together to create one horrifying and exciting story for this volume! I loved the way that Ed Brubaker made Josephine into such a mysterious person as we still do not know about her true identity and how she is able to possess the power to mind control people. I felt like Nicolas Lash in this story as I also want to know more about Josephine and why the Devils are searching for her and it makes me sit at the edge of my seat trying to solve this mystery myself and see who Josephine really is! I also loved the way that Ed Brubaker wrote the horror elements in this graphic novel as I did find myself cringing at a few scenes where various people are killed in a gruesome manner and I think that it greatly captures the horror element of this volume! Sean Phillips’ artwork: Sean Phillips’ artwork is as usual gorgeous to look at as the characters’ features look truly realistic and I loved the way that Sean Phillips made Josephine look so gorgeous throughout the years as it really made her stand out from the other characters and shows us that she has an unnatural quality to her character. I also loved the dark and gritty tones of the city of Los Angeles as it really brings out the horror elements of this story. What made me feel uncomfortable about this story: For anyone who does not like strong language and gory violence, this volume does contain many scenes of characters getting killed in gruesome ways and it does have some strong language such as the “s” word and dropping the “f” bomb popping up in the dialogues a few times. Final Thoughts: Overall, “Fatale: The Devil’s Business: Book Two” is truly a fantastic volume that anyone who is a fan of Ed Brubaker’s “Fatale” series or anyone who is a fan of horror and noir graphic novels should definitely check out! Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  5. 4 out of 5

    Forrest

    Another "drop everything else" read by Brubaker and co. This time the noir takes on a '70's theme, but this is no Starsky and Hutch. No, again we are steeped in a criminal underworld that is merely a facade for something far more sinister. The minions want money, to be sure, but the real monsters are . . . well, real monsters. I'm intrigued at how Brubaker, through story and image, elicits feelings of sympathy for Josephine who hides more than she shows. Is she a demon or an angel? More appropri Another "drop everything else" read by Brubaker and co. This time the noir takes on a '70's theme, but this is no Starsky and Hutch. No, again we are steeped in a criminal underworld that is merely a facade for something far more sinister. The minions want money, to be sure, but the real monsters are . . . well, real monsters. I'm intrigued at how Brubaker, through story and image, elicits feelings of sympathy for Josephine who hides more than she shows. Is she a demon or an angel? More appropriately, where does she lie on the continuum between the two? Or is she outside of such dualities all together? And what of Nicolas? Can he avoid the fate of so many of Jo's past loves? Or will he end up being swallowed, like so many others, by forces he cannot hope to comprehend? Brubaker is at it again. Though the primary setting for this volume has moved from the traditional noir setting of the 1930's and '40's to the 1970's, this volume doesn't lose a step from Volume 1 at all. Compelling characters, a writhing background plot reminiscent of BPRD, and candid glimpses into the Manson-esque Method Church all weave a sticky net for the eager reader. I've not been drawn into a series like this in a very, very long time, and I hope this series lasts a very, very long time. Addendum: If you really want to immerse yourself in this volume of Fatale, I'd recommend first lighting up some incense. Then before your reading watch this video by Opeth, in order to get in the proper mood. Then, after you're done reading, watch this video as the desert course. Now, please stay away from sharp objects and candles made from baby fat while engaging in this exercise.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Welcome to the Seventies! Devils Business is the second book in the Josephine -Fatale story arc by Brubaker and Phillips. It is rather loosely connected to book one, featuring the Never-aging Josephine in the midst of the laid-back seventies Hollywood with Satanic cults and hippie followers, Hollywood parties, and hints and discoveries regarding Jo’s past in the 20’s and 50’s. It contains terrific artwork and a noir-infused storyline.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Just as crazy as volume 1 but a little easier to follow this time. Nicolas Nash is in modern time, or least current time for the whole story, and he's under this weird spell of sorts that makes him HAVE to find out who this Josephine really is. So this time instead of the 50's we head to the 70's. With more actors, bigger cults, scary vicious people, and a lot of death and betrayal, you have another crime story with supernatural twist. Good: I found this era more interesting and honestly better Just as crazy as volume 1 but a little easier to follow this time. Nicolas Nash is in modern time, or least current time for the whole story, and he's under this weird spell of sorts that makes him HAVE to find out who this Josephine really is. So this time instead of the 50's we head to the 70's. With more actors, bigger cults, scary vicious people, and a lot of death and betrayal, you have another crime story with supernatural twist. Good: I found this era more interesting and honestly better than the last book. This time we have actual characters I cared about what happened to them and the shocks and twist actually hit home this time. The pacing of the story is also easier to follow and more interesting this time around. The art, as always, is amazing. Bad: The main storyline with Nicolas at times feels disconnected and not as interesting as the storylines of Josephine. Overall, another solid volume in the series. While not amazing it's still really good. A 3.5 out of 5 but I'll bump it to a 4.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    The setting moves to sleazy 1970s Hollywood where Jo is living the life of a rich recluse. As we've grown to know, Josephine is never far from controversy and when a B-list actor and his butchered friend nearly fall into her lap, Jo must try to avoid all the violence that they inadvertently bring with them. I had to have my jaw surgically reattached after I finished the first volume of Fatale. Once again, Brubaker and Phillips left me with a vast appreciation for the entertainment that they provi The setting moves to sleazy 1970s Hollywood where Jo is living the life of a rich recluse. As we've grown to know, Josephine is never far from controversy and when a B-list actor and his butchered friend nearly fall into her lap, Jo must try to avoid all the violence that they inadvertently bring with them. I had to have my jaw surgically reattached after I finished the first volume of Fatale. Once again, Brubaker and Phillips left me with a vast appreciation for the entertainment that they provide us. They are true masters of their craft. However, all the greats fail to deliver once or twice, even Wayne Gretzky was held scoreless every now and then. Continuing with my hockey reference, With volume two, the duo played a great game but didn't really put on a memorable performance. But that's the thing about a player as solid as Gretzky, you can allow for off nights but the fact is, he's still Wayne Gretzky, and you know you can't keep a good guy down for long. The collected issues (6-10) contained within, and the main story told, really came across as, for lack of a better word, messy. I didn't quite feel that connection with Miles as I have with characters they've written in the past and found myself pondering what was happening with Lash in present day. I suppose the 70s Hollywood/Satanic Cult stuff just didn't grab my attention long enough to hold my interest. I have no doubt that this series will rebound and become something special. Maybe we're just in that lull period in a story that sometimes solely exists to get characters from point A to point B. While that's not something I'm used to with regards to these guys, it's something I'm willing to look past (for once).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’s creepy and intriguing “Fatale: Book Two: The Devil’s Business” carries on the Lovecraft-inspired horror-noir story of Josephine, the mysterious brunette who never ages and leaves a trail of broken men in her wake. In Book Two, Josephine has been laying low in her Hollywood bungalow for the past three decades, knowing that the forces of evil are out there, waiting to trap her. It’s the late-‘70s: an era of sideburns, acid rock, and Charles Manson. When a down-on-his- Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’s creepy and intriguing “Fatale: Book Two: The Devil’s Business” carries on the Lovecraft-inspired horror-noir story of Josephine, the mysterious brunette who never ages and leaves a trail of broken men in her wake. In Book Two, Josephine has been laying low in her Hollywood bungalow for the past three decades, knowing that the forces of evil are out there, waiting to trap her. It’s the late-‘70s: an era of sideburns, acid rock, and Charles Manson. When a down-on-his-luck actor, Miles, stumbles upon an 8 mm snuff film that could topple a Hollywood cult called the Method Church, Josephine offers to help. Unfortunately, she quickly learns that the cult has less to do with kinky sex and more to do with cosmic horror. Hansel, the human vessel that is host to an ancient demon, is the leader of the cult, and he’s after Josephine. Meanwhile, in the present, Nicholas Lash continues his own search for Josephine, led on by a resurfaced memory of his childhood, when his father and Josephine crossed paths, with tragic consequences. Unfortunately, his investigation leads him down a very dark road, one that leads to a bleak, cold jail cell... This is a slow burn story, but whatever Brubaker/Phillips is building up to, God only knows. Well, the Devil probably knows too...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    Bullet Review: I am attributing the lower rating on this volume to the fact it has been almost a year since I read volume 1. Nick continues to investigate the strange woman in the past, while we watch this woman move through the 70's and a strange cult. Sometimes it was tough to distinguish the men apart, and gosh, are there a lot of MEN (not so many women, though there were some really good ones when they did appear). It's definitely creepy, spooky, and noir-y (look, I made a new word, Mommy!). I Bullet Review: I am attributing the lower rating on this volume to the fact it has been almost a year since I read volume 1. Nick continues to investigate the strange woman in the past, while we watch this woman move through the 70's and a strange cult. Sometimes it was tough to distinguish the men apart, and gosh, are there a lot of MEN (not so many women, though there were some really good ones when they did appear). It's definitely creepy, spooky, and noir-y (look, I made a new word, Mommy!). I have volume 3, so here we go!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Not quite as engaging as the previous volume. I think it's the new characters. The setting (70s Hollywood underworld) is promising enough. But I didn't find the new characters quite as relatable or interesting to read about. There's still plenty of mystery surrounding who or what Josephine is, even by the end. And lets face it: even Brubaker's mediocre noirish comics are better than a depressing amount of what else is out there.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    An improvement over the first volume. The story starts to come together and things become a bit more clear.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    It's hard to call the teamwork between Brubaker and Phillips anything but wonderful, but this is just such a filler of a sequel that it's hard not to be a little disappointed. In this second volume, the story again bounces between the present day with Nicolas Lash and Josephine's past which this time takes place in 1970's Los Angeles. In the present day segments, Lash is desperately trying to figure out who the hell Josephine was and why she rescued him and the crime novel manuscript that his It's hard to call the teamwork between Brubaker and Phillips anything but wonderful, but this is just such a filler of a sequel that it's hard not to be a little disappointed. In this second volume, the story again bounces between the present day with Nicolas Lash and Josephine's past which this time takes place in 1970's Los Angeles. In the present day segments, Lash is desperately trying to figure out who the hell Josephine was and why she rescued him and the crime novel manuscript that his godfather wrote but never published. In the process of trying to figure out why and how he has been involved with what's obviously a pretty shady situation, and why he cares so much about this woman he knows nothing about, Nicolas is pursued by some seriously scary men. Meanwhile, in 1970's L.A., Jo has settled into a life as a recluse, trying to avoid contact with anyone other than her housekeeper/caretaker as she searches for a way to get a book that might have the answers she needs. Trouble is, said book resides in the hands of the sinister cult which wants to get their tentacled hands on her as soon as possible for purposes as yet unknown. The cult's leader can no longer use his supernatural abilities to track Jo thanks to Walter's actions at the end of the last volume but said cult leader is doing his best to find her with the money and connections that his cult has to the Hollywood industry. Additional side characters get involved with both the cult and Jo, allowing Jo to build a plan to get her hands on the book she so desperately needs. Brubaker and Phillips are clearly building the suspense here, giving the reader a little more information on Jo's past, while still keeping you desperately wanting more, as well as giving a little insight into the cult's leader and his activities. Needless to say, he is one twisted son of a bitch. The problem for me was that I didn't care about the additional side characters (Miles and Suzy) in the same way that I cared for Hank and Walter so it felt so much like filler. And after how amazing the first volume was, I can't help but feel like this one's a bit of a let down. Despite that, this series is building towards something wonderfully dark and I'd recommend it with the caveat that it's not quite as good as the first one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I enjoyed the 2nd Volume, but not as much as the 1st. It still had me turning the pages and curious, but it just seemed like there wasn't as much that pulled me in, and I think it might have been the supporting characters...Mitch didn't have the same interest for me as Hank/Dominic. I would also have liked a bit more from Nick in the present day, but still, great visually, solid story. Still looking forward to the next installment, as I do with almost anything Brubaker writes. Phillips is also a I enjoyed the 2nd Volume, but not as much as the 1st. It still had me turning the pages and curious, but it just seemed like there wasn't as much that pulled me in, and I think it might have been the supporting characters...Mitch didn't have the same interest for me as Hank/Dominic. I would also have liked a bit more from Nick in the present day, but still, great visually, solid story. Still looking forward to the next installment, as I do with almost anything Brubaker writes. Phillips is also a fantastic artist.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ed Erwin

    Easier to understand than volume 1, or maybe I was just paying more attention. Begins filing-in some details.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This felt like a sequel - new scenery, some of the same characters, deepening the mythology of the universe in which these stories live. It was good but not great y'know? Like you already knew the major elements of who and what, so this was just filling in the details? I like it don't get me wrong - just hard to figure -*why* exactly. It's a sense that there's little unease or additional world-shattering mystery about to unfold in here. It might hing on my shoddy memory of the details - of who an This felt like a sequel - new scenery, some of the same characters, deepening the mythology of the universe in which these stories live. It was good but not great y'know? Like you already knew the major elements of who and what, so this was just filling in the details? I like it don't get me wrong - just hard to figure -*why* exactly. It's a sense that there's little unease or additional world-shattering mystery about to unfold in here. It might hing on my shoddy memory of the details - of who and what occurred in the last trade, so I might've missed a few nuances that really made this sing. Jo seems just as much a cypher - or more - than who we met the last time. Dominic is endlessly superficial here, superfluous. Miles and Suzy and Hans and the rest of the gang, all expendable in this land of the Fatale, like they all exist to further serve Jo's almost lack-of-a-quest. Wow do I sound disappointed - maybe this isn't something to read on a lazy Sunday afternoon, half-hazy brain just barely stringing sentences together, like a lizard sunning on a smooth, slightly mossy rock. Don't let the fanatics of the Brubaker/Phillips Mongol hordes get me, I didn't mean it honest!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom Mathews

    The more I read from Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips, the more I want to read. The more I read from Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips, the more I want to read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cristina | Books, less beer & a baby Gaspar

    I really like Fatale but this vol 2 was weaker than vol 1, I felt like something was missing. But still good, with the 50s noir atmosphere!

  19. 4 out of 5

    BellaGBear

    I'm starting to love this series more and more. It is a nice mix between a noir detective story and paranormal. Mainly, it is a lot of, albeit gory, fun.

  20. 5 out of 5

    C. Varn

    Brubaker and Philips pick up a few months after the story present of "Death Chases Me" left off, and the proverbial plot thickens. This story held my attention a bit more as the nature of both Josephine and her antagonists became more clear. The extension of Josephine's incidental ability to compel men becomes clearer as are the costs to it. The sleazy of the 1970s and the cults around it play a role in the flashback plot. This sleazy is something Brubaker and Philips are particularly adapt at p Brubaker and Philips pick up a few months after the story present of "Death Chases Me" left off, and the proverbial plot thickens. This story held my attention a bit more as the nature of both Josephine and her antagonists became more clear. The extension of Josephine's incidental ability to compel men becomes clearer as are the costs to it. The sleazy of the 1970s and the cults around it play a role in the flashback plot. This sleazy is something Brubaker and Philips are particularly adapt at portraying in their noir conventions and somewhat traditional comic art, which really does mirror some of the comics of the era. The character flaws remain: the leading men aren't good, but they are less bad than the cultists. You don't know if you are suppose to feel sorry for their moral failings or see their fates as justified. Josephine's moral character remains murky and at times inconsistent. Female characters that aren't Josephine generally are just their to be victimized and murdered, generally horribly, after showing how irresponsible the men who encounter Josephine become. Nicolas Lash, the story present protagonist of the first book, remains here and his relationship to his uncle and the cult are explored. It becomes clearer that Nicholas is probably doomed himself, but also that this is contemporary. The setting, cars, etc. in the first book made the story present very hard to date--no cellphones, no computers (although there is a microfiche depicted). That said, the stories still feel messy. The exact nature of Josephine does just seem unrevealed, it seems unclear. The depths of the tentacle faced antagonist is also unclear, but too much of them is shown for them to remain a shadowy menace. That said, the pulp dialogue, the art, the mystery... it really keeps me coming back. Even a slightly off work for Brubaker and Philips is better than a lot of the "prestige" comics I read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    A lot of people who liked part one were not as fond of this installment. I actually liked it slightly better, so now we're even.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    So Brubaker is a great and inventive writer, with plenty of ideas. He does some great superhero comics and some great crime comics, but when he tries the mashups, such as Fatale (of noir and horror) and Incognito (noir and superheroes), they work less well for me. Others seem to like them, anyway, because Brubaker is a great writer, usually, and Phillips is a great artist, usually. Great team. This one, besides mashing up noir and horror, which didn't work so well for me, also does the Helter Sk So Brubaker is a great and inventive writer, with plenty of ideas. He does some great superhero comics and some great crime comics, but when he tries the mashups, such as Fatale (of noir and horror) and Incognito (noir and superheroes), they work less well for me. Others seem to like them, anyway, because Brubaker is a great writer, usually, and Phillips is a great artist, usually. Great team. This one, besides mashing up noir and horror, which didn't work so well for me, also does the Helter Skelter/Manson family reference, which others seemed to like, but I thought it was already top-heavy with ideas, and with this added in, eh.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    Oh man. I don't know why, but I really struggle to make an emotional connection with this story. It is still well-written (it's Brubaker after all), but it feels like it's not enough of noir and not enough of lovecraftian horror. It is kind of bland on both fronts, and the supernatural element feels very artificial and out of place. The core mystery about why Josephine is the way she is falls flat for me, too. I don't know, man. Maybe it's one of those things where the work of fiction is just no Oh man. I don't know why, but I really struggle to make an emotional connection with this story. It is still well-written (it's Brubaker after all), but it feels like it's not enough of noir and not enough of lovecraftian horror. It is kind of bland on both fronts, and the supernatural element feels very artificial and out of place. The core mystery about why Josephine is the way she is falls flat for me, too. I don't know, man. Maybe it's one of those things where the work of fiction is just not for you, even though I loved everything I've read by Brubaker previously. We'll see. I will give it another chance with the next volume.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    Volume 2 takes place in the 1970s with Josephine. A struggling actor, Miles, and his friend end up in her house covered in blood. They have gotten mixed up in a Satanic cult with a leader that Josephine knows too well. Having a different main male character than Nick made me like this volume less, as Miles wasn't exactly like-able to me. Due to the urgency and action, he and Josephine have a very short relationship. There is no further explanation as to what Josephine it, but she must have some s Volume 2 takes place in the 1970s with Josephine. A struggling actor, Miles, and his friend end up in her house covered in blood. They have gotten mixed up in a Satanic cult with a leader that Josephine knows too well. Having a different main male character than Nick made me like this volume less, as Miles wasn't exactly like-able to me. Due to the urgency and action, he and Josephine have a very short relationship. There is no further explanation as to what Josephine it, but she must have some sort of very special power. There's lots of blood and darkness. Similar tone to the first. The ending of the volume is shocking, as it does not bode well for Nick.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Václav

    (4,5 of 5 for the continuation of Lovecraftian noir crime story from one of greatest comics creators: Brubaker-Phillips-Steward) I like Fatale. I know I would like it before I even started thanks to authors - creative duo Brubaker-Phillips is sure bet and Dave Steward is colouring legend. The story is interesting just from the pitch and it even exceeded my expectations. Let's get the art from the table first - it's awesome and totally complementing the story and theme. The story is good, even if (4,5 of 5 for the continuation of Lovecraftian noir crime story from one of greatest comics creators: Brubaker-Phillips-Steward) I like Fatale. I know I would like it before I even started thanks to authors - creative duo Brubaker-Phillips is sure bet and Dave Steward is colouring legend. The story is interesting just from the pitch and it even exceeded my expectations. Let's get the art from the table first - it's awesome and totally complementing the story and theme. The story is good, even if it has less Lovecraftian vibe and it's more cult-ish and it resonates well with the seventies. But Jo's story is expanding and getting explained more, she's the one stable point in her dangerous, violent world and all other characters are just falling stars, inevitably rushing to their tragic ends. I really liked the Fatale is consistent, but the atmosphere in the second arc is a bit different - but in a good way. Jo works as a character perfectly, Brubaker develop her in his best skill and it feels very realistic. And I appreciate the ending - it's well balanced between a cliffhanger and satisfying ending with well-needed closure. Fatale is terrific comics, no doubt that.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amanja

    This is the spoiler free review of Fatale, the full series, a Lovecraftian noir graphic novel from the minds of Brubaker and Phillips. If you would like to read the spoiler full version complete with all of the weird monsters and revelations please visit https://amanjareads.com/2020/08/19/fa... This was my introduction to the works of Brubaker and Phillips. And a solid one at that! I am excited to keep reading their dark noir graphic novels after this one. Fatale is about a woman named Jo. She is This is the spoiler free review of Fatale, the full series, a Lovecraftian noir graphic novel from the minds of Brubaker and Phillips. If you would like to read the spoiler full version complete with all of the weird monsters and revelations please visit https://amanjareads.com/2020/08/19/fa... This was my introduction to the works of Brubaker and Phillips. And a solid one at that! I am excited to keep reading their dark noir graphic novels after this one. Fatale is about a woman named Jo. She is mysterious, might be immortal, and definitely has a strong power over any man she meets. She also has ties to a monstrous cult that does all the classic sacrifices and blood pacts. The series moves back and forth along a time line that is longer than Jo's youthful appearance would suggest. We get to see Jo's present, past, and ultimately what happens to her. There are twists and turns, revelations, myths, and lots of sex and violence. There is absolutely no shortage of entertainment on these pages. If you are expecting to read this casually, reconsider. There is a ton packed on these pages. Jo is an incredibly complex female protagonist. Yes, she is sexy, but she is so much more. She's haunted, powerful yet vulnerable, brave yet tired, and above all else she just wants to find a way out. Fatale is a disturbing mystery that takes the reader across at least three generations as well as locations both grounded and mystical. The art is absolutely stunning. Phillips really matches Brubaker's prose in both mood and intensity. They compliment each other seamlessly. The main issue with this book is that it could be a little confusing at times. Particularly at the beginning when you still have no idea about the mythos surround Jo and the cult. It felt like there were a bunch of characters that I had no idea who they were or what their relationships were for at least three issues. Additionally, volume 3 of Fatale is a weak middle run. It features several loosely connected stories surrounding women similar to Jo throughout history but it ultimately didn't add to the series overall. Despite those couple of flaws I can still strongly recommend this book. I am very interested to read more from this pair and see how much more complex and dark they can get. It's always good to read anything new and they seem to have captured a mix of old style with new content. Any noir fan should take a step out of their comfort zone to explore this graphic novel series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    Nicolas after losing his leg in the first volume, loses the manuscript in this one--with a flashback to 1978 and Josephine still fighting (or well keeping a sensible distance from) the Old God cultists in an LA already dealing with the Manson and other cults. Duly have ordered the rest of the series--especially with how this volume ends!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Koen Claeys

    An excellent pageturner, like all the books by Brubaker & Phillips. Love it! An excellent pageturner, like all the books by Brubaker & Phillips. Love it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul Swanson

    Great occult-horror-noir based in 70's Hollywood.... the Devil's business, eh? amirite???? Not as off the wall and fresh as the first one. Not as horrific as a police officer kneeling on the neck of George Floyd for at least seven minutes as he pleaded for his life while other officers apathetically stood near and let him be killed.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Abbie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There’s some cult action, Jo does something stupid, another man gets killed because of her...This run around is getting a little old and I’m ready to know more about how she never ages.

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