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My Beef with Meat: The Healthiest Argument for Eating a Plant-Strong Diet - Plus 140 New Engine 2 Recipes

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For the millions who are following a plant-based diet, as well as those meat-eaters who are considering it, My Beef With Meat is the definitive guide to convincing all that it's truly the best way to eat! New York Times Bestelling author of The Engine 2 Diet and nutrition lecturer Rip Esselstyn, is back and ready to arm readers with the knowledge they need to win any argum For the millions who are following a plant-based diet, as well as those meat-eaters who are considering it, My Beef With Meat is the definitive guide to convincing all that it's truly the best way to eat! New York Times Bestelling author of The Engine 2 Diet and nutrition lecturer Rip Esselstyn, is back and ready to arm readers with the knowledge they need to win any argument with those who doubt the health benefits of a plant-based diet--and convince curious carnivores to change their diets once and for all. Esselstyn reveals information on the foods that most people believe are healthy, yet that scientific research shows are not. Some foods, in fact, he deems so destructive they deserve a warning label. Want to prevent heart attacks, stroke, cancer and Alzheimer's? Then learn the facts and gain the knowledge to convince those skeptics that they are misinformed about plant-base diets, for instance: You don't need meat and dairy to have strong bones or get enough protein You get enough calcium and iron in plants The myth of the Mediterranean diet There is a serious problem with the Paleo diet If you eat plants, you lose weight and feel great My Beef With Meat proves the Engine 2 way of eating can optimize health and ultimately save lives and includes more than 145 delicious recipes to help readers reach that goal.


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For the millions who are following a plant-based diet, as well as those meat-eaters who are considering it, My Beef With Meat is the definitive guide to convincing all that it's truly the best way to eat! New York Times Bestelling author of The Engine 2 Diet and nutrition lecturer Rip Esselstyn, is back and ready to arm readers with the knowledge they need to win any argum For the millions who are following a plant-based diet, as well as those meat-eaters who are considering it, My Beef With Meat is the definitive guide to convincing all that it's truly the best way to eat! New York Times Bestelling author of The Engine 2 Diet and nutrition lecturer Rip Esselstyn, is back and ready to arm readers with the knowledge they need to win any argument with those who doubt the health benefits of a plant-based diet--and convince curious carnivores to change their diets once and for all. Esselstyn reveals information on the foods that most people believe are healthy, yet that scientific research shows are not. Some foods, in fact, he deems so destructive they deserve a warning label. Want to prevent heart attacks, stroke, cancer and Alzheimer's? Then learn the facts and gain the knowledge to convince those skeptics that they are misinformed about plant-base diets, for instance: You don't need meat and dairy to have strong bones or get enough protein You get enough calcium and iron in plants The myth of the Mediterranean diet There is a serious problem with the Paleo diet If you eat plants, you lose weight and feel great My Beef With Meat proves the Engine 2 way of eating can optimize health and ultimately save lives and includes more than 145 delicious recipes to help readers reach that goal.

30 review for My Beef with Meat: The Healthiest Argument for Eating a Plant-Strong Diet - Plus 140 New Engine 2 Recipes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    My Beef with this book. My main beef with this book is that Rip Esselstyn has sold out. He has partnered with Whole Foods and advertises on his web sites for many different products. He even has his own brand of cereal now sold in Whole Foods. That is fine for him and I have no problem with him making money. However, profit driven advice is not necessarily the healthiest thing for you. I got Rip's books because I am reading "Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition" by T. Colin Campbell and he My Beef with this book. My main beef with this book is that Rip Esselstyn has sold out. He has partnered with Whole Foods and advertises on his web sites for many different products. He even has his own brand of cereal now sold in Whole Foods. That is fine for him and I have no problem with him making money. However, profit driven advice is not necessarily the healthiest thing for you. I got Rip's books because I am reading "Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition" by T. Colin Campbell and he advocates strongly for a plant based whole foods diet. I have also read books by Michael Pollen who shares the same viewpoint and since Rip's first book, "The Engine 2 Diet" has a forward by T. Colin Campbell, I thought that they shared the same views. Rip, however includes lots of highly processed foods in his recipes and diet suggestions, things that have more than 5 ingredients, many of which are unpronounceable chemicals. Michael Pollen would not approve. Furthermore, Rip replaces fats with sugars. Many of his salad dressings include maple syrup. I personally don't like sweet salad dressings. I make my own salad dressings with EVOO and vinegar - usually balsamic, red wine and apple cider vinegars all mixed or perhaps with some fresh garlic, ginger, lime juice or lemon juice. I do not think that is any less healthy than a salad dressing made with maple syrup. Rip does explain that large amounts of oils are unhealthy, but I think that in moderation, they should be fine. Rip also includes tons of soy in his recipes. He tells us not to believe everything we believe about soy, but admits that "there is not yet conclusive evidence" about it, and it "may in fact both help and hurt us" but, "like most natural ingredients...don't do anything bad to you if you don't eat too much of them." I feel the same way about EVOO and coconut oil thank you. I have made some of the recipes from this cookbook which, by the way, are not made up by Rip himself, but by his friends and family. I made the "Crispy Polenta Strips" which are coated with "corn flake crumbs (from a canister, not from your old cereal boxes!)" - definitely a highly processed food. They were ok. I also tried to make the "Spicy Italian Eat Balls" which lists 1 cup wheat gluten as an ingredient. I looked up wheat gluten online and it was listed as seitan, so I bought that and used it in the recipe. That was the wrong ingredient. What is needed in that recipe apparently is vital wheat gluten, a dry wheat flour rather than wheat gluten aka seitan which is a lumpy moist wheat product. Rather than meat balls, I had mush, which I put in a loaf pan and baked like meatloaf. It still did not stick together and was just mush, but it tasted ok. I will try to make it again using vital wheat gluten and see how it turns out. Lastly, I made the "Lime-Ginger Tofu Cubes", soy - and I used Braggs Liquid Aminos instead of low-sodium tamari sauce because the low sodium sauce still has 710 mg of sodium per serving as opposed to the over 900 mg in the regular sauce while the Braggs has 160 mg of sodium per serving. The Lime-Ginger Tofu Cubes were very good. I do think that Rip brings up some good issues about healthy eating in his book and many of the recipes seem good as well. I continue to be skeptical about all of the soy ingredients and the egg replacer and many of the highly processed foods that he includes. I don't think that is truly a whole foods diet and I am not sure that replacing meat and dairy with processed soy and other processed items is the best diet. I think it would be better to leave the soy and processed foods out and stick to just whole foods.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emmy

    I have read Rip's first book The Engine 2 Diet and let me start by saying that this is not that book. The Engine 2 Diet explains why a plant based diet is good for you, and teaches you how to implement it into your life. It gives some room for the hesitant meat eater to ease into this way of life. My Beef With Meat assumes that you've already converted or are close and are looking to be able to handle conversations with the meat eaters in your life. He's blunt and in your face in this book. He g I have read Rip's first book The Engine 2 Diet and let me start by saying that this is not that book. The Engine 2 Diet explains why a plant based diet is good for you, and teaches you how to implement it into your life. It gives some room for the hesitant meat eater to ease into this way of life. My Beef With Meat assumes that you've already converted or are close and are looking to be able to handle conversations with the meat eaters in your life. He's blunt and in your face in this book. He got you making the changes in Engine 2 and now he needs you to know why this is the best way to take control of your health. He doesn't sugar coat it. He doesn't give you an out for eating your grass fed beef over giving it up all together. But, he gives you the tools you need to present the hard facts to others still holding on to their dead animals. There are also 140 new recipes and I've already made one that was fantastic! Read this book!

  3. 4 out of 5

    One

    While I didn't learn anything new, it is still a good book. This is especially good for those who are not all that familiar with the benefits of a plant based diet. I like the humorous approach that is taken and the fact that he covers so many areas. While I didn't learn anything new, it is still a good book. This is especially good for those who are not all that familiar with the benefits of a plant based diet. I like the humorous approach that is taken and the fact that he covers so many areas.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    I learnt quite a bit from this book and I found it an interesting read. Not tried the recipes yet but they do sound tempting. Recommended.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ari

    A hard hitting, fast paced, sensible overview of the long-term benefits of cutting meat and milk out of your diet. By de-emphasizing the moral standpoint (only one 2 page chapter hits on cruelty to animals) and emphasizing the health elements (meats and milks contain tons of bad, difficult to digest fats and animal proteins), Rip makes a strong case for switching to plant-strong diet. He furthers his argument by explaining that we can get all our vitamins and proteins from the assortment of plan A hard hitting, fast paced, sensible overview of the long-term benefits of cutting meat and milk out of your diet. By de-emphasizing the moral standpoint (only one 2 page chapter hits on cruelty to animals) and emphasizing the health elements (meats and milks contain tons of bad, difficult to digest fats and animal proteins), Rip makes a strong case for switching to plant-strong diet. He furthers his argument by explaining that we can get all our vitamins and proteins from the assortment of plants available to us. Rather than a diet of cutting carbs and going against our own desires, we can eat delicious foods to fullness and still lose weight and be healthier. This is because veggies are natural energy providers and break down much easier than meat and milk. Don't have too many heavily processed substitutes, like fruit juices which cut out fibers of fruit skin or french fries loaded in oils and salt, but rather a sampling of his easy to make and delicious sounding recipes: Red Quinoa salad with black beans and corn Lean, mean green split-pea burgers beer-battered onion rings spicy spinach and black bean burgers raise-the-barn butternut squash-vegetable lasagna black bean and sweet potato quesadillas A total of 140 recipes, with some mouth watering full color pictures to get you excited. Here's a statement I never heard before on page 27: Plants are bone strong "Remember that dairy and meat products contain a lot of animal protein, which itself is chock-full of amino acids that cascade through our bloodstream. In order to neutralize these acids, the body needs to release something alkaline to restore our natural pH balance. And guess what? One of the most effective alkalizing agents is the calcium stored in our bones. So while that chocolate milk you're drinking might have a lot of calcium, its high animal-protein content ironically ends up siphoning essential calcium from your bones! Holy osteoporosis, Batman!" To back this up, he sources that of the 140 clinical trials on the link between dairy consumption and bone density, 2/3s found dairy did not promote stronger bones. The Harvard Nurses study showed fracture rates higher for those who consumed three of more servings than those who drank nothing. Lastly, Americans consume tons of milk, yogurt and cheese yet have an osteoporosis epidemic. When our top killers are heart attacks, we should consume less of it's cause. Especially if there is a tasty and energizing alternative. Although I personally enjoy the taste of meat, I often feel tired or sore after eating it, whereas I rarely do so on a pure plant-strong meal. So up those lentil and quinoa counts, say yes to leafy greens, and minimize the amount of unnecessary animal proteins that our bodies can handle, but not without repercussions.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Beau Raines

    I'll start out that I eat paleo and eating that way has changed my life. My friend Laura mentioned that she was reading the book and the book description sounded intriguing, especially to get counter-points to my chosen lifestyle. What I found interesting as I read the book that the chapters about vegetables read just like many of the other paleo books I'd read: vegetables are packed with necessary nutrients, eat lots of them, eat in variety, limit sweets and processed foods. In a very simple sum I'll start out that I eat paleo and eating that way has changed my life. My friend Laura mentioned that she was reading the book and the book description sounded intriguing, especially to get counter-points to my chosen lifestyle. What I found interesting as I read the book that the chapters about vegetables read just like many of the other paleo books I'd read: vegetables are packed with necessary nutrients, eat lots of them, eat in variety, limit sweets and processed foods. In a very simple summary, like paleo, but without meat and added back in grains. Like many of the paleo books I've read, this book details the nutrients that humans need and vegetables provide. But unlike other paleo books (particularly Cordain's), it doesn't talk about how much a person needs on a daily basis of those nutrients and how to get all those in a plant based diet. I didn't feel like there were many arguments why meat was bad, but how superior veggies are. And I think his summary of the paleo lifestyle are pretty elementary and might be more how some people implement paleo (just eating bacon all day long) as opposed to how it was intended (lean meats, lots of veggies, avoid sugars, no grains). The first time he mentioned a baseball players "plant-strong" diet, I thought that he was writing about someone who had the majority of his diet from plants and actually did eat some meat. After "plant-strong" and "meat-weak" were repeatedly mentioned, I realized that it was a caveman like (pun intended) adjective to not so subtly support his argument. This is a good book to learn about the importance of vegetables in your diet and counter the questions that vegetarians get about how they eat. However, I think it falls short in the "meat is bad" category. I'd recommend people interested in switching to a vegetarian diet read this book, but less if you are just looking for general education.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kate Merriman

    Wow! This is the perfect book to give someone who wants to get all the facts they need about eating - and then can then make smart decisions about what Rip accurately terms "your number one asset, your health"! The chapters are concise and written in a no-nonsense fashion with just the right balance of humor and honesty. You've got to love a book with chapters like "Plants Perk Up Your Pecker", "Chocolate! You Bet!" and "Poops from Heaven"! All of Rip's material is backed up with solid science. Wha Wow! This is the perfect book to give someone who wants to get all the facts they need about eating - and then can then make smart decisions about what Rip accurately terms "your number one asset, your health"! The chapters are concise and written in a no-nonsense fashion with just the right balance of humor and honesty. You've got to love a book with chapters like "Plants Perk Up Your Pecker", "Chocolate! You Bet!" and "Poops from Heaven"! All of Rip's material is backed up with solid science. What I didn't realize was that the book ALSO contains a whole mess of new recipes in the back too! So for those of you who already have caught the plant-strong wave, it's still a worthy purchase. For me, the most helpful chapter is "Lose the Moderation Mentality" and the great email it contains from a man who achieved excellent results following the Engine 2 program. Also awesome advice from this chapter (and a good sample of the style throughout the book): "When I think of a loving relationship, I think of a mutual give-and-take, something that loves you in return. The reality is that cheese, steak and ice cream do not love you back. They punish you with the contraband that is inherent in each of them. I am hereby letting you know you are officially in an abusive relationship, and as such I give you permission to sever the relationship. When you get home tonight, I want you to let these foods know you are finished with them. And when you kick them out of the house, be sure to tell them to not let the door hit them in the butt. You. Can. Do. It!!!"

  8. 4 out of 5

    April

    Ok...this is really just a re-telling of many of the same things in The Engine 2 Diet: The Texas Firefighter's 28-Day Save-Your-Life Plan that Lowers Cholesterol and Burns Away the Pounds and The China Study (or Forks Over Knives). This is helpful for you Vegans/Veggie eaters and whole foods/ plant strong that are having a difficult time explaining to the 'meaties' in your life WHY you've chosen to eat like this. At one point he's talking about a conversation where a gentleman never had to expla Ok...this is really just a re-telling of many of the same things in The Engine 2 Diet: The Texas Firefighter's 28-Day Save-Your-Life Plan that Lowers Cholesterol and Burns Away the Pounds and The China Study (or Forks Over Knives). This is helpful for you Vegans/Veggie eaters and whole foods/ plant strong that are having a difficult time explaining to the 'meaties' in your life WHY you've chosen to eat like this. At one point he's talking about a conversation where a gentleman never had to explain to his friends when he grabbed his 4th slice of pizza and his 2nd or 3rd beer...but as soon as he commented that he was switching to a plant strong diet...suddenly his friends were bio-chemists and very concerned about his red blood cell count! (While it was sort of funny...I've had these conversations!) He is basically (with facts from the previous mentioned sources) refuting the arguments that many meat eaters throw out when faced with a plant strong diet individual. Where do you get your iron? You won't get enough B12. There's no calcium in your diet. You can't be getting enough protein! It's too expensive. It just plain ole doesn't taste good. Rip goes through these arguments and more. But, it's the same old, same old. You're not going to convince anyone what you believe if they don't want to believe it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Karen Robb

    Rip's newest book is excellent. I've been plant based for over three years and know first hand the health benefits of not eating meat, dairy and eggs. His latest book gives great information whether you are already eating this way, just starting out on this journey or thinking about going plant based. Rip puts it in simple terms and provides the proof and information to back up the claims that a whole foods plant based diet can improve your health and help reverse and prevent many diseases. The Rip's newest book is excellent. I've been plant based for over three years and know first hand the health benefits of not eating meat, dairy and eggs. His latest book gives great information whether you are already eating this way, just starting out on this journey or thinking about going plant based. Rip puts it in simple terms and provides the proof and information to back up the claims that a whole foods plant based diet can improve your health and help reverse and prevent many diseases. The recipes are amazing and delicious.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Julie Johnson

    I read Engine 2 Diet last year and liked this book as well. There is a lot of information that dispels many myths out there about eating a plant strong diet. I am back on track with eating and cooking this way and I feel better and have more energy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Hudson

    Book pinpoints all the myths about a person needing to eat meat to live.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Mccracken

    Very accessible and easy reading but he hits all the points!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gayle Pritchard

    I never would have picked up this book based on the title or the goofy title, but the librarian recommended it when the title I was seeking was not available. I was pleasantly surprised at the number and variety of amazing recipes, all meeting my parameters of no or limited oil, sugars and salt, and limited grains. The book would benefit from more illustrations, but I can’t wait to try out some of the recipes.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Just in time for your Fourth of July barbeque comes my review of Rip Esselstyn’s new book, My Beef with Meat: The Healthiest Argument for Eating a Plant-Strong Diet. I know. Aren’t I just a kick in the pants? You’re probably thinking something along the lines of who the hell invited this killjoy (that would be me) to dinner? After all, it’s the Fourth of July; it’s practically un-American not to fire up some burgers, hot dogs, and chicken on the grill, right? Well, as Americans, that’s sort of ou Just in time for your Fourth of July barbeque comes my review of Rip Esselstyn’s new book, My Beef with Meat: The Healthiest Argument for Eating a Plant-Strong Diet. I know. Aren’t I just a kick in the pants? You’re probably thinking something along the lines of who the hell invited this killjoy (that would be me) to dinner? After all, it’s the Fourth of July; it’s practically un-American not to fire up some burgers, hot dogs, and chicken on the grill, right? Well, as Americans, that’s sort of our problem. Eating animal products (including dairy) is, according to Esselstyn, one of the causes of the dramatic increase in diseases and conditions such as heart attack, stroke, diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, cancer, and others. We’ve gotten so used to thinking of these illnesses as an inevitable part of our lives and of the aging process that it becomes difficult to consider that there might be a different path. And indeed, there is. In My Beef with Meat, Esselstyn, a former firefighter in Austin, TX, takes aim at all the myths and questions surrounding eating a plant-strong diet. For example, the issue of protein – and where in the world one can possibly get protein if one doesn’t eat meat. Although I knew that certain vegetables contained protein, I didn’t realize how plentiful it was in some fruits. In his book, Esselstyn breaks it down for his reader with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Database. A cup of strawberries, for instance, has 8.3% of protein. One orange? 7.4%. There’s a whopping 9.3% in one peach. And again, that’s just fruits! As a vegetarian myself for 17 years – and someone who tries to eat as plant-strong as possible - the protein issue is the number one question I get from people about my way of eating. Now, thanks to Rip Esselstyn, I have some good responses. Esselstyn explains that the World Health Organization recommends that protein make up only about 10% of total calories in the human diet. (Others suggest up to 20% of our calories should come from protein sources.) Given the fact that the average American consumes 200 pounds of meat each year, it’s probably a safe bet to say that most of us are consuming way more than the recommended 10-20% of protein. Yeah. Read that again. That’s not a typo. The average American eats 200 pounds of meat a year. Think about that as you fire up your grill this week. Another myth that Esselstyn shatters is that it’s expensive to eat a diet of primarily fruits vegetables, grains, legumes, and nuts. When compared to the cost of doctors’ visits, prescriptions, and lost time from work, a plant-based diet seems downright cheap. Beans, oats, bananas, potatoes, and brown rice are all very affordable. Speaking of costs, Esselstyn gets into that with the sustainability issue as it affects the planet. It takes seven pounds of grain and 2,400 gallons of water to produce just one pound of “factory-farmed beef.” That’s a lot of water to make those 200 pounds of meat that a person eats each year. And don’t get me started on the chemicals and contaminants. Esselstyn states that the FDA estimates that meat contains 500 and 600 different kinds of unnatural chemicals – but that our government only tests for 60 of them. Sixty! And again, we wonder why we’re seeing increased numbers of people with cardiovascular disease and cancer. Do I sound like I’m lecturing or as if I’m a vegetarian proselytizer? Then that’s just me. Really. Because in My Beef with Meat, Esselstyn doesn’t come across that way at all. With a very approachable, simple, and down-to-earth manner, Rip gives his reader a big bowl of statistics flavored with some humor. (Chapters have titles like “Oil is the New Snake Oil,” “Barbeque + Meat = Danger,” and even “Poops from Heaven.”) He doesn’t make you feel guilty; he doesn’t give you a hard sell. What Rip Esselstyn does do is present a reasonable, common-sense approach to eating more plant-based foods – along with 140 recipes to help you get started (or, if you’re pretty much a convert to the plant-strong way of eating like me, to inspire you with new ideas). All of the recipes in the book are plant-strong (meaning, no animal products or by-products), contain no added oils, use little or no salt, use minimally-processed sweeteners such as maple syrup or dates, and are very easy to make. I confess I didn’t have a chance to try and review any of the recipes in My Beef with Meat before writing up this review. I do, however, make a very close version of the Tomato Sandwich. Nonetheless, I’m hoping to get to these new Engine 2 recipes soon: Anne’s Pumpkin Muffins Cranberry-Polenta French Toast No-Moo-Here Mashed Potatoes Fire Brigade Stuffing Mad Greek Gyro Bad 2 the Bone Chili Black Bean and Sweet Potato Quesadillas Handstand Burgers Spicy Spinach and Black Bean Burgers (a Happy Herbivore recipe!) Crispy Polenta Strips Fast and Fresh Marinara Sauce Tortilla Soup with Crispy Sticks and almost all of the dressings, hummus varieties, guacamoles, and spreads. In the meantime, I have some Fourth of July grillin’ to do. Pass the corn on the cob, tomatoes, squash, potatoes, portabella mushrooms, and pineapple! Thank you to Grand Central Publishing for providing me an advance e-copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    Definitely written in a way to grab and keep your attention, especially for guys (although it's for everyone). Easy to read too with solid science behind it. Definitely written in a way to grab and keep your attention, especially for guys (although it's for everyone). Easy to read too with solid science behind it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    I read this during the time I was also reading Whole, by Colin Campbell. Both are arguments to eat a whole foods, plant-based diet- even referred to by Dr. Campbell as the WFPB diet - for your health and for the health of the planet (and the animals). But they approach the subject from different angles. I think it's useful and instructive to read both. Esselstyn's book is a combination: half is the logical scientific arguments against eating animal foods and in favor of plant-based whole foods. I I read this during the time I was also reading Whole, by Colin Campbell. Both are arguments to eat a whole foods, plant-based diet- even referred to by Dr. Campbell as the WFPB diet - for your health and for the health of the planet (and the animals). But they approach the subject from different angles. I think it's useful and instructive to read both. Esselstyn's book is a combination: half is the logical scientific arguments against eating animal foods and in favor of plant-based whole foods. It is, as he says himself, all of the answers to the meat-eaters' questions. Campbell's book is both narrower and broader: it provides the scientific background, simplified for the intelligent lay reader, for treating nutrition in a "wholistic" rather than a "reductionist" way. Throw out the single-element studies and study, instead, the whole body and how it reacts to whole foods, says Campbell. Esselstyn agrees that the only healthy way to eat is to eat the whole food. He makes cases that are a bit more reductionist than Campbell, however. He looks at individual dietary needs and shows how plants satisfy those requrements (Campbell, by contrast, shows how simplistic calculating nutrients can be). Beyond that, however, Esselstyn counters the actual challenges that have been thrown at him over the years. He makes the case that "plant strong" (his term) eating is cheap, easy, and delicious. He addresses supplements (no need to take any), grass-fed as opposed to grain-fed cattle, the myths about oils, and more. What's more, he does so with confidence, humor, and simplicity. Each chapter is short - no more than three pages - and addresses a single question. Anyone reading (and rereading) these chapters is going to be ready for anything the meat-eater wants to ask. The second half of the book is the recipes. A generous 140 recipes culled from all over the place, tested and retested. Each one is plant-strong, uses no added oils, little or no salt, and only natural sweeteners. Each is easy to make and includes ingredients that should not be hard to find. I have tried several and loved them all. The lasagna takes a lot of prep but goes together easily and is wonderful (great for a potluck). The brownies were a hit at a vegan gathering recently. It's a nice combination - the information you need and the recipes you will love.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    I watched Rip Esselstyn's Engine 2 Kitchen Rescue associated with Forks Over Knives on Netflix recently. I knew that the Engine 2 diet was plant based and that I saw this guy all over Whole Foods but that was the extent of my knowledge with Engine 2 etc. I'll be honest, the Kitchen Rescue irritated me for a number of reasons, including when Esselstyn stated that vegans eat a lot of processed food. Well way to generalize and assume Esselstyn! Yes, there are junk food vegans and vegans who are as I watched Rip Esselstyn's Engine 2 Kitchen Rescue associated with Forks Over Knives on Netflix recently. I knew that the Engine 2 diet was plant based and that I saw this guy all over Whole Foods but that was the extent of my knowledge with Engine 2 etc. I'll be honest, the Kitchen Rescue irritated me for a number of reasons, including when Esselstyn stated that vegans eat a lot of processed food. Well way to generalize and assume Esselstyn! Yes, there are junk food vegans and vegans who are as clueless about nutrition as the next person but let's not make such sweeping statements eh? I was also baffled as to why Esselstyn insists on being an oil Nazi, I'm surprised he even allows avocados. Honestly he seems a bit extreme, and I know that the average person would never be able to maintain a diet that even eliminates oil and minimizes salt to a degree to make everything bland. As a long time ethical vegan I can honestly say nothing Esselstyn prepared on Kitchen Rescue looked good except for the banana ice cream...but it wasn't chocolate so I would probably pass on that too. I do, however, appreciate Esselstyn calling the diet plant based rather than vegan since vegan connotes a lifestyle. So Kitchen Rescue made me really intrigued as to what was contained in the Engine 2 diet books I had seen prior. I was not impressed. Esselstyn is obsessed with exclamation points and cheesy lines. Also I felt as though his arguments were not as strong as they should have been considering he is trying to convince people to alter their entire way of eating, which is difficult for most people. Esselstyn also barely touches upon the animal and environmental reasons a plant based diet is important, two aspects which are the most important to me personally. Then there are the recipes. I am very good at reading recipes and have cooked an untold number of vegan recipes for years and years and most of these recipes just made me sad. The level of flavor and salt is seriously lacking in most of them and would probably just make you want to skip dinner. The body needs both fats and salt, although don't go overboard, but holy crap, let's not make our lives pitifully lacking flavor and enjoyment. I am vegan and I love food, stop trying to make it seem like an oxymoron. Bland food is what has given vegan food a bad name and we don't need Esselstyn furthering this false claim.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Yodamom

    The author, a firefighter saw a need for change with so many overweight and unhealthy friends in his field. He brings some very interesting information to us in this his second book. He covers scientific research facts that show perhaps our present �modern dietetic facts we are all fed aren't all true. He also covers many of the popular diets and why he feels they are not as healthy as directed by general thinking. Do we really need all that dairy, meat and oil to be healthy ? What about in the The author, a firefighter saw a need for change with so many overweight and unhealthy friends in his field. He brings some very interesting information to us in this his second book. He covers scientific research facts that show perhaps our present �modern dietetic facts we are all fed aren't all true. He also covers many of the popular diets and why he feels they are not as healthy as directed by general thinking. Do we really need all that dairy, meat and oil to be healthy ? What about in the bedroom ? Will giving up all the protein mess with your love life ? He goes into that, and clears the worry from your mind. There is even a "How to win an argument with a meat eater" chapter. This chapter alone might make many of us change our diets when faced with the truth. You only have one body, and he wants you to take care of it. Oh boy, get ready for some good eats. The recipes are fabulous and there are over 100 of them. They look amazing and gives you a great variety so your diet doesn't get stale. My teenage daughters already have a list ready to make for the week ahead. I read book 1 and got a lot of information from it this one has even more to offer. I have seen friends health do complete turn arounds on this diet. To me it seems common sense when you read the fact which eating way is best for the human body. �What we are doing now doesn't seem to be working, people are more overweight, have more health issues and need more medical intervention. Perhaps we can reverse that with just a few changes. Why not try ?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    I had been wanting to get healthier and try to avoid heart disease and cancer as I age, and was curious about going from vegetarian (20 years) to vegan and asked a friend how she did it - this was her response: Engine 2. I looked it up on the Internet and selected Rip Esselstyn's book Plant-Strong to read on Kindle. I devoured this book, which was so full of information and inspiration and, on a practical basis, many good recipes and lists of new-to-me ingredients to use in food preparation. The I had been wanting to get healthier and try to avoid heart disease and cancer as I age, and was curious about going from vegetarian (20 years) to vegan and asked a friend how she did it - this was her response: Engine 2. I looked it up on the Internet and selected Rip Esselstyn's book Plant-Strong to read on Kindle. I devoured this book, which was so full of information and inspiration and, on a practical basis, many good recipes and lists of new-to-me ingredients to use in food preparation. There are many references to scientific research so the recommendations are backed up with information on real world results of studies as well as personal experiences. It's been eight months since I started on my Whole Foods Plant Based journey and I am very happy to say that, although it was difficult to give up cheese and finally the milk I used in my morning coffee, I have discovered many new ways to prepare and eat nutritious food and I am over 20 pounds lighter and feel teriffic. I highly recommend this book if you are interested in getting some guidance on how to change your lifestyle and learn how eating more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes (beans) and lentils, can improve your health.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    I've been reading a lot about vegan diets. Over the past few days I also read "The Kind Diet" by Alicia Silverstone. I think that book was a much better read. I also recently read Kimberly Snyder's "The Beauty Detox Foods." I did like "My Beef With Meat," though. It is especially good with providing arguments in favor of a plant-based diet, especially to counter the push-back vegan converts are likely to receive from meat-eating friends and family. He's a bit less specific than some other books I've been reading a lot about vegan diets. Over the past few days I also read "The Kind Diet" by Alicia Silverstone. I think that book was a much better read. I also recently read Kimberly Snyder's "The Beauty Detox Foods." I did like "My Beef With Meat," though. It is especially good with providing arguments in favor of a plant-based diet, especially to counter the push-back vegan converts are likely to receive from meat-eating friends and family. He's a bit less specific than some other books about what to eat or not eat. He is basically cool with any and all plants. I felt he failed in his soy chapter; I don't believe he mentioned that most soy in the U.S. is GMO. He's also really anti-oils, which is great, but he's really opposed to even using olive oil -- and like Silverstone, he doesn't even mention coconut oil. My opinion of coconut oil is quite positive, but I'm not an expert. I would have liked to hear more about what he thinks of it as a means of getting healthy fats into the diet and using it for cooking or in place of butter.

  21. 5 out of 5

    JR Ronaghan

    I already don't eat meat (6+ years), so that shock wasn't new to me, but I recently opted to remove dairy from my diet as a trial to see how I'd feel, if I'd fell healthier, etc...then this book came out. It backs up every change I've instituted in my diet with facts and detailed explanations and has now motivated me to permanently adopt a plant-strong/vegan way of life. I have yet to try to replicate any of the plethora of recipes in the back, but perused most if them and am rearing to go in ter I already don't eat meat (6+ years), so that shock wasn't new to me, but I recently opted to remove dairy from my diet as a trial to see how I'd feel, if I'd fell healthier, etc...then this book came out. It backs up every change I've instituted in my diet with facts and detailed explanations and has now motivated me to permanently adopt a plant-strong/vegan way of life. I have yet to try to replicate any of the plethora of recipes in the back, but perused most if them and am rearing to go in terms of trying them out. If you haven't felt the healthiest recently, aren't thrilled with your weight, are always taking prescribed meds, or are looking for a rejuvenation with your eating habits give this book a read. I will note that is NOT a fad or a "hot new diet scheme"; this is real, it works and its a lifestyle change you will ultimately not regret.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    The information is good in "My Beef With Meat" and the recipes sound amazing. I have so many flagged to try I'm buying the book. My beef with this book and the reason I gave it 3 stars is the cussing. Several times to make a stronger point expletives are used and limit who I would give this book to. Other than that complaint a good quick read. The information is good in "My Beef With Meat" and the recipes sound amazing. I have so many flagged to try I'm buying the book. My beef with this book and the reason I gave it 3 stars is the cussing. Several times to make a stronger point expletives are used and limit who I would give this book to. Other than that complaint a good quick read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Youngteach

    Just skimmed Rip's new book. Our plant-strong family always likes a good Engine 2 recipe (minus the jalapeños for the little ones!). Rip is back with more health information for the plant-curious and recipes that will be sure to please even the most reluctant omnivore. Just skimmed Rip's new book. Our plant-strong family always likes a good Engine 2 recipe (minus the jalapeños for the little ones!). Rip is back with more health information for the plant-curious and recipes that will be sure to please even the most reluctant omnivore.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Hower

    Rip's case makes total sense to me. Hubby & I have been on a plant-strong, vegan diet for just over a month. We feel great, are losing weight (though that wasn't the main objective) and giving our kids a great example of how to eat healthy. The recipes are really yummy too. Rip's case makes total sense to me. Hubby & I have been on a plant-strong, vegan diet for just over a month. We feel great, are losing weight (though that wasn't the main objective) and giving our kids a great example of how to eat healthy. The recipes are really yummy too.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Good read; chock full of interesting information about the food we eat. Will definitely make you think before you put that next bite of meat in your mouth.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Toby Brennen

    In our family there is an oft asked 'riddle', "how can you tell if someone is vegan?" Answer: "You don't have to, they'll tell you." And usually right after "Hi! My name is . . . . " I don't intend to ridicule vegans or vegetarians. Many of my best friends are one or the other - and I quite possibly may be joining their ranks. But the 'joke' sets the tone for how I felt about "Plant-Strong: Discover the World's Healthiest Diet" by Rip Esselstyn. The book is an easy read, but aggressive and unfli In our family there is an oft asked 'riddle', "how can you tell if someone is vegan?" Answer: "You don't have to, they'll tell you." And usually right after "Hi! My name is . . . . " I don't intend to ridicule vegans or vegetarians. Many of my best friends are one or the other - and I quite possibly may be joining their ranks. But the 'joke' sets the tone for how I felt about "Plant-Strong: Discover the World's Healthiest Diet" by Rip Esselstyn. The book is an easy read, but aggressive and unflinching. Esselstyn makes 36 points about why eating a plant-based diet is superior and eating meat is only for lunk-headed fools. There is a sprinkling of 'facts.' But as is often the case with diet related books, references to research results are cherry picked to support the view point of the writer with few citations pointing to consistent and long term research. This might be because the book is intended to arm fellow plant eaters with weaponry on how to assault their meat eating brethren - and not assist someone who is possibly on the path of plant awareness. As implied above, I am newly on a plant-based journey myself and while I did not appreciate the tone, I persisted and was able to uncover several useful 'nuggets' that aligned with various other materials I have read recently. I side stepped the poor puns and forced plays-on-words to glean a sprinkling of empowering help. The last 1/2 (2/3's) of the book are recipes (this is how I was able to finish the book in a day) many of which looked wonderful and I have already chosen a few that I will attempt at my earliest opportunity. This may be a great health book but there is too much divisiveness in the world for me to appreciate the tone. Maybe it was intended as humor but with the general vegan assertiveness I've experienced it was hard for me to read it that way. [2.5/5]

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karen Andrews

    I often recommend this book for guys wanting to move toward or try out a plant-centric approach to cooking and eating. The recipes all taste good, and the food is hearty. Rip's writing style is catchy and easy to read. He is a living example of a competitive elite athlete who succeeded on an exclusively plant-based diet. These days, the author is a crusader for the health benefits of the lifestyle he espouses. In addition to recipes, the book imparts a nice mix of science and success stories of I often recommend this book for guys wanting to move toward or try out a plant-centric approach to cooking and eating. The recipes all taste good, and the food is hearty. Rip's writing style is catchy and easy to read. He is a living example of a competitive elite athlete who succeeded on an exclusively plant-based diet. These days, the author is a crusader for the health benefits of the lifestyle he espouses. In addition to recipes, the book imparts a nice mix of science and success stories of people whose lives and health were dramatically improved after adopting this way of eating. I continue to make recipes from this book; many have become favorites in regular rotation. They are reliably good and uncomplicated if I want to try something new. I gave this book to my son, who is also a firefighter, and he enjoys the food. A revised edition of this book came out in paperback with the title "Plant-strong: Discover the world's healthiest diet." It has a few more recipes added to the original "My Beef With Meat" book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    This is one of Rip's earlier titles and much easier reading than some of his later books. Not much has changed since he wrote it. We still know that humans can get adequate (and delicious) nutrients including protein, iron, and calcium without ever eating animals or partaking of their excretions. His father's research and that of many other doctors still recommend excellent plant-based nutrition to prevent or reverse degenerative disease instead of partaking of drugs or submitting to surgery. Li This is one of Rip's earlier titles and much easier reading than some of his later books. Not much has changed since he wrote it. We still know that humans can get adequate (and delicious) nutrients including protein, iron, and calcium without ever eating animals or partaking of their excretions. His father's research and that of many other doctors still recommend excellent plant-based nutrition to prevent or reverse degenerative disease instead of partaking of drugs or submitting to surgery. Like the Word of Wisdom, this research and these recommendations could streamline medicine, reduce self-inflicted degenerative disease, increase vibrancy, joyfulness, and intelligence of the next generation, end world hunger, heal the planet, and free up the wealth of nations and individuals if people would only adopt the principles. I read the book for the recipes, some of which I will try (BBQ LOL sounds yummy). The Esselstyns are some of my favorite people.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David Bean

    To be clear - I agree with the vast majority of conclusions and overarching message that Esselstyn espouses when he talks about nutrition. I just really don't care for how he makes those arguments. I think perhaps I'm not the target audience for this book. I've read books on nutrition that do an excellent job of preaching to the choir, and I've read others that seem to adopt a more friendly, casual, at times almost condescending tone of the door to door evangelist spreading the gospel of plant b To be clear - I agree with the vast majority of conclusions and overarching message that Esselstyn espouses when he talks about nutrition. I just really don't care for how he makes those arguments. I think perhaps I'm not the target audience for this book. I've read books on nutrition that do an excellent job of preaching to the choir, and I've read others that seem to adopt a more friendly, casual, at times almost condescending tone of the door to door evangelist spreading the gospel of plant based eating. This is the latter. But when that tone is taken while at the same time cherry picking studies/results and oversimplifying complex issues and arguments to shore up the message you're preaching - well it just doesn't leave this choirmember feeling like this is a tract that I would recommend to interested parties. Recipes looked pretty good though.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Fast

    Torn between 4 stars given some awkward writing moments and general 'brash' attitude and more juvenile pejorative phrases for non plant based eaters. the main goal is to take skeptics and encourage them to try a taste and back up 'feelings' with blood work data, and on that I think this is a success. overall a good book, very "layman" approach to proven studies and research explained in an easy way to remember and relate. True stories and very important message to clarify without only coming from Torn between 4 stars given some awkward writing moments and general 'brash' attitude and more juvenile pejorative phrases for non plant based eaters. the main goal is to take skeptics and encourage them to try a taste and back up 'feelings' with blood work data, and on that I think this is a success. overall a good book, very "layman" approach to proven studies and research explained in an easy way to remember and relate. True stories and very important message to clarify without only coming from uninformed activists or hyper knowledgeable academics hence I'll give a pass on the sophomoric tone throughout. Keep on Rippin facts Rip and stay plant strong. recipes so far have been very good.

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