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The Art of BioShock Infinite

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In The Art of BioShock Infinite, delve deeper into the city of Columbia--the fabled floating metropolis that serves as a beacon of technology and achievement for the early 1900s! This deluxe hardcover features production designs and concept illustrations focusing on main characters Booker DeWitt, Elizabeth, and Songbird from the BioShock Infinite video game. See the evolut In The Art of BioShock Infinite, delve deeper into the city of Columbia--the fabled floating metropolis that serves as a beacon of technology and achievement for the early 1900s! This deluxe hardcover features production designs and concept illustrations focusing on main characters Booker DeWitt, Elizabeth, and Songbird from the BioShock Infinite video game. See the evolution of Sky-Hooks, Heavy Hitters, the populace of Columbia, Vigors, airships, and much more! * BioShock Infinite won over 75 video game awards, including Best Original Game and Best of Show! * Introduction by creative director Ken Levine.


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In The Art of BioShock Infinite, delve deeper into the city of Columbia--the fabled floating metropolis that serves as a beacon of technology and achievement for the early 1900s! This deluxe hardcover features production designs and concept illustrations focusing on main characters Booker DeWitt, Elizabeth, and Songbird from the BioShock Infinite video game. See the evolut In The Art of BioShock Infinite, delve deeper into the city of Columbia--the fabled floating metropolis that serves as a beacon of technology and achievement for the early 1900s! This deluxe hardcover features production designs and concept illustrations focusing on main characters Booker DeWitt, Elizabeth, and Songbird from the BioShock Infinite video game. See the evolution of Sky-Hooks, Heavy Hitters, the populace of Columbia, Vigors, airships, and much more! * BioShock Infinite won over 75 video game awards, including Best Original Game and Best of Show! * Introduction by creative director Ken Levine.

30 review for The Art of BioShock Infinite

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Greendale

    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. The Art of Bioshock Infinite not only provides a stunning array of concept art for the game, but it also includes early design sketches and color illustrations of a darker, more sinister version of the city of Columbia that was eventually scrapped in lieu of the colorful and airy city in the sky featured in the game. Early concepts for mechanical creatures were macabre in design, crafted with bronze and copp Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. The Art of Bioshock Infinite not only provides a stunning array of concept art for the game, but it also includes early design sketches and color illustrations of a darker, more sinister version of the city of Columbia that was eventually scrapped in lieu of the colorful and airy city in the sky featured in the game. Early concepts for mechanical creatures were macabre in design, crafted with bronze and copper and featuring lifeless eyes and disproportionate anatomy. Initial designs for human characters demonstrate art nouveau inspired scarring on the faces, flesh eating creatures with clawed hands, and gruesome facial splicing. The chapter on Elizabeth is a particular favorite. Before her personality was nailed down, concept artists created myriad sketches of her at all ages with varied clothes, posture, demeanor, and disposition. Several pictures depict her states of evolution, ultimately arriving at the big blue-eyed, intelligent and capable beauty that was the final iteration. Surprisingly few pages are dedicated to the lead protagonist, Booker DeWitt. In initial concepts, he went from brutish thug to scowling youth to a square-jawed comic book hero before arriving at an everyman with a pronounced jawline and piercing eyes. Booker DeWitt's image needed to match his gruff voice and irascible character. [. . .] Getting Booker just right was a complex task. A chapter on Songbird reveals initial sketches where he went from mechanical dragon to flying man to mythical beast and, finally, to giant mechanized bird capable of flight. Illustrations depict the complex mechanical workings of his construction and reveal how challenging it was to make him articulate varied expressions. Brief attention is given to characters like Zachary Comstock, Rosalind and Robert Lutece, Fink, Cornelius Slate, and Daisy Fitzroy. Heavy hitters, on the other hand, get their fair share in the limelight: Boys of Silence with their horn ears and gaping mouths; the Siren dressed in tattered threads of cloth and surrounded by film-like grain; Motorized Patriots bearing the cracked rubber faces of past presidents; and the Handyman, gruesomely constructed and bearing over-sized appendages. A chapter on vigors - beverages the protagonist drinks to gain supernatural powers - offer a tantalizing array of concept designs for bottles. Before its conclusion, the book also provides sketches and colorful concept art for the skyhook, weapons, airships, and the final iteration of Columbia - dazzling city in the sky.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anzu The Great Destroyer

    I’ve always been a Bioshock fan and I’ve been waiting to play Infinite for months, like a lunatic. And when the time came and I got my hands on it, oh how happy I was. Bioshock Infinite has one of the best, if not the best, stories in the gaming industry. It’s more than a story; it’s an incredible experience that will stay with me for years to come. I was so glad to see that Dark Horse is publishing a book for the Bioshock Infinite concepts because I am an artist myself and I live to learn and I I’ve always been a Bioshock fan and I’ve been waiting to play Infinite for months, like a lunatic. And when the time came and I got my hands on it, oh how happy I was. Bioshock Infinite has one of the best, if not the best, stories in the gaming industry. It’s more than a story; it’s an incredible experience that will stay with me for years to come. I was so glad to see that Dark Horse is publishing a book for the Bioshock Infinite concepts because I am an artist myself and I live to learn and I also work as a game artist and books like these always help in discovering how the big fish roll. As for the book itself, it was as good as I was expecting it to be. Even though most of the concepts didn’t make it in the game, it’s fascinating to see how all these ideas and all this hard work carved the game into its final form. Their team is full of extremely talented artists and this aspect shows in every single piece of artwork that is inside this book. I absolutely loved it and I will try as hard as possible to buy the printed version because it’s totally worth it. Review also posted on

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeann (Happy Indulgence)

    This review has been cross-posted on my Happy Indulgence blog. Check it out for more reviews! Now for something a bit different with a combination of my love for games and books. The Art of Bioshock Infinite is a hardcover artbook featuring concepts that made it to the final game, but mostly those that didn't. A lot of love and attention has gone into creating and producing one of the games of the year, and the artwork showcased here is evidence of it. With paintings, sketches, coloured designs a This review has been cross-posted on my Happy Indulgence blog. Check it out for more reviews! Now for something a bit different with a combination of my love for games and books. The Art of Bioshock Infinite is a hardcover artbook featuring concepts that made it to the final game, but mostly those that didn't. A lot of love and attention has gone into creating and producing one of the games of the year, and the artwork showcased here is evidence of it. With paintings, sketches, coloured designs and comic book sketches covering the major parts of the game, including characters, advertisements/propaganda, vigors, weapons and columbia itself, the book is beautiful to look at. The way the artbook is set out itself tells us a story of how the game evolved. At first, we're given a very different introduction of Columbia's first concepts, the evolution of characters in between and Columbia in it's final stages at the end of the book. I enjoyed the journey that this artbook had to offer and it heightens my appreciation for the artists themselves. They have a difficult task ahead of them by nailing the concepts in the final game, and we see the stages that they have to go through, from exploring different footwear to their technical design. What's immediately evident from flipping through the pages, is that most of the concepts did not make it to the final cut. The artists meticulously explored many aspects of character design and concept creation, from Elizabeth's costume to Songbird's mechanical design and the vigors themselves. Many of the concepts are excellent, such as the terrifying enemies of Columbia including an evil toymaker, mutilated people caught in the tears, and flying Big Daddies. From the first cuts to the final drafts, The Art of Bioshock Infinite shows how Bioshock could have been a very different game in it's earlier stages. Frustrating in a sense, but perhaps for the better considering how the game turned out. With an introduction by Kevin Levine, the game's creative director, there isn't a whole lot of reading to be done here other than extremely brief explanations on some pages about what the artwork is. While this is primarily an artbook, I would have appreciated a bit more depth to it, accompanying the pages of pages of imagery here. I probably would have been more wowed if I had received this book in hardcover format, but alas, one cannot complain when awarded a Netgalley even in mobi format. I'd recommend this artbook to hardcore fans of Bioshock Infinite who wish to explore the world a bit further, and perhaps budding artists or game designers, but the audience is probably limited to that. I probably wouldn't have had the chance to check out this game companion if not for the galley, so thank you to Diamond Book Distributors and Netgalley for this review copy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Conor

    Booker: "I don't understand." Elizabeth: "We don't need to, it'll happen all the same." Booker: "Why?" Elizabeth: "Because it does. Because it has. Because it will." When I first saw the promo art for this game I was disappointed. It seemed a cheap knockoff of one of the greatest and most unique settings in video games history (Rapture, the underwater utopia gone to hell). But when I finally played the game it shocked me. It not only lived up to one of the greatest games I've ever played (Biosh Booker: "I don't understand." Elizabeth: "We don't need to, it'll happen all the same." Booker: "Why?" Elizabeth: "Because it does. Because it has. Because it will." When I first saw the promo art for this game I was disappointed. It seemed a cheap knockoff of one of the greatest and most unique settings in video games history (Rapture, the underwater utopia gone to hell). But when I finally played the game it shocked me. It not only lived up to one of the greatest games I've ever played (Bioshock 1) but in many ways surpassed it. While this game doesn't have the isolated, dark, horror-style feeling of the first game I truly came to appreciate the world of Colombia. Where Rapture in the first 2 games felt like a tomb overrun by zombie like creatures Colombia felt alive (albeit filled with violence, oppression and uprising). The combat as well was more slick, dynamic and varied than the first game with more powers and more open areas to sneak or fight around. However what really made this game great was the story, primarily the relationship between Booker and Elizabeth. It's kind of a cliched trope. The cynical mercenary forced to protect the vulnerable young girl (see: Last of us, Logan etc.) but it was done beautifully with both characters brilliantly written. (view spoiler)[ That made the revelations at the end all the more brutal. As Elizabeth was forced to kill Booker/Comstock to prevent the nightmare of Colombia (hide spoiler)] Like the first game this game also had some real curve-ball plot twists. However parts of the plot-twists in this game were not as convincing (view spoiler)[ Elizabeth as Booker's daughter made sense and was well set up and executed, as was all the stuff with the Lutece's. However I wasn't a fan of the Comstock is Booker reveal. I didn't think it was particularly well set up in terms of establishing similarities between them (like with the similar twist in KoToR 1 which was done much better). Comstock was a cowardly blowhard who never shuts up throughout the course of the game while Booker was a tough, silent man of action. (hide spoiler)] The game also provided some of the most memorable scenes of any game I've played. 2 of the most notable were Booker having to battle through a robotic recreation of the battle of little bighorn to take out his deranged (but still perversely honourable) former Commanding Officer and friend. Later in the game a flash forward into a potential future for Elizabeth was horrifying and heartbreaking with a brilliant gradual build-up to it. Finally this game had a very good DLC in Burial at Sea 1 and one of the greatest DLCs I've played in it's sequel. Together they did a brilliant job of tying up some loose ends in the story, tying this game in with the first 2 and providing a savage emotional gut-punch at the very end. (view spoiler)[ I loved the more stealth oriented mechanics playing as Elizabeth in BaS 2 and especially how it addressed her relationship with Booker. Her conversation at the end with Booker (who she knew existed only in her imagination) where she forgave him and said she missed him was heart-breaking. As was her sacrifice to set the events of the first game in motion and save the little sisters. (hide spoiler)] Overall Bioshock was one of the greatest video-game series I've ever played. Easily one of the most compelling series in games with thought-provoking political commentary and shocking plot twists. And unlike many series it refused to drag on to try to drag as much cash as possible out of fans. It ended with just 3 games leaving fans wanting more. And Infinite was the perfect ending to one of the most intelligent and unique series' in gaming

  5. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

    Wow, the art in this book is amazing, the styles, influences and creativity are ingenious and brimming skill and love. Because Irrational games didn't have to stick to the rapture concept, it makes for some truly amazing and diverse art and whilst I love the game it makes you wonder what bioshock infinite could have been in an alternate universe. I especially love the really dark and gritty concepts. For fans of the game, art or both I would say that this is a must.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    Picked this book up to use as reference for an upcoming Comic Con, this book is absolutely beautiful. Definitely recommend to anyone a fan of Bioshock and the worlds of both Rapture and Columbia.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    Full review posted at My Book Addiction. I am a gamer at heart. Always have been, always will be. My husband really hit the jackpot, didn’t he? We have two PS3 consoles in our house so we can game together; one in the kids playroom (we told them it’s for them, but really… lol), and one in our living room. Sure there are games that he likes that I don’t, and vice versa, but there are many games we both love to play. The BioShock series is definitely on the list of games we both enjoy. Survival ho Full review posted at My Book Addiction. I am a gamer at heart. Always have been, always will be. My husband really hit the jackpot, didn’t he? We have two PS3 consoles in our house so we can game together; one in the kids playroom (we told them it’s for them, but really… lol), and one in our living room. Sure there are games that he likes that I don’t, and vice versa, but there are many games we both love to play. The BioShock series is definitely on the list of games we both enjoy. Survival horror is my favorite genre in the video game world; add to that some phenomenal steampunk graphics and I’m in heaven. Everything about BioShock Infinite has drawn me in, from the very first time I saw the commercial advertising the newest game in the franchise, to this superbly crafted book of art. I have a huge Steampunk fetish, so my jaw drops every time I see anything related to this game. The concept art in The Art of BioShock Infinite is stunning; almost too striking to find words that adequately describe it. The dynamic presence of this art stirs an emotional reaction inside of me. Perhaps being surrounded by artist for a large portion of my life has taught me an appreciation for it that I wouldn’t feel so deeply otherwise. The colors are so bold and bright in contrast to the perfectly placed shadows. Having only an advanced ebook copy of this book is not nearly acceptable. I will definitely be purchasing the hardcover, which I know for certain will further blow my mind. "I imagine there are some people who want to get in the games industry who envision the development of a video game goes like this: A team of smart and talented people just get together in a glass-walled conference room, order some pizza, and emerge after a big all-nighter with the blueprint for a great game. From there, it’s imagined, all that’s required is for everyone to rest up for a weekend, show up to work on Monday morning, and start building to spec. If anybody knows a place where it works like that, please give me their number." – Ken Levine, Irrational Games, November 2012 I love the concept notes within these pages. Being able to read them while witnessing the evolution in this art book gave me a glimpse into the minds of this remarkably creative team. This book not only gives us another look at what we’ve already seen inside the world of BioShock Infinite, but it also greatly compliments the video game because of the comprehensive perspective of what didn’t make the final cut. Being able to observe the characters, the villains, and structures brought to life, or not, in some cases, is an amazing gift for anyone that truly appreciates the creative process. I highly recommend The Art of BioShock Infinite to avid collectors of art books and/or gamers. This one will be going on my “most prized possessions” shelf!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michelle (In Libris Veritas)

    So I'll admit that I am a big fan of art books based on video games and tv shows, there is something about seeing all the cool concepts and work that went into a loved project that just makes the experience even cooler. I'd have to say that this one is no exception. Bioshock Infinite is a game that a lot of game fans were looking forward to since the first two games in the series, and since it took a long time to come together it is really cool see what kind of ideas the creators were throwing ar So I'll admit that I am a big fan of art books based on video games and tv shows, there is something about seeing all the cool concepts and work that went into a loved project that just makes the experience even cooler. I'd have to say that this one is no exception. Bioshock Infinite is a game that a lot of game fans were looking forward to since the first two games in the series, and since it took a long time to come together it is really cool see what kind of ideas the creators were throwing around before settling on the final storyline and designs. If you are not familiar with Irrational Games' still of game, it tends to lean towards the designs that elicit some sort of emotion from the player, it could be repulsion or it could be curiosity (is it human or machine?) but it's guaranteed to catch your eye. The concept art is really strong in itself and I'm actually a bit sad that somethings couldn't be used in the new game because they look amazing. There are whole sections dedicated to the character design/development for Elizabeth and Booker, as well as sections on the vigors, Columbia, Songbird, and propaganda posters seen through out the game. I am a big fan of the Vigor section because I honestly think I'd buy the bottles they designed if they were available, some of them are really great looking. The propaganda section is also really great because many of the posters in the game might end up being glanced over during the action, so it's a good chance to see them. The artwork is beautiful and I love the full page scenes they depict some of the early ideas for the city of Columbia and Elizabeth. The one complaint I have about this book is that while there is a ton to look at, there is not a lot of reading involved. I know it's not meant to be textbook thick, but I would have loved a bit more explanation about the ideas behind some of the concepts or why they went the way they did. Other than that it is a beautiful artbook that makes a great companion to the game, and if you are a Bioshock fan then I'm sure you'll really like this one. I received this in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    A brilliant collection of artwork from both the finished game and unused material. Character and enemy designs, beautiful artwork of Columbia, Vigors and propaganda posters and advertisments from the game are all found here for our enjoyment. While I'd definitely recommend the book to anyone (BioShock fans in particular), I warn anyone that playing 'BioShock Infinite' will evoke mixed reactions to this book. On one hand, you get an appreciation of how different the finished game is to the origina A brilliant collection of artwork from both the finished game and unused material. Character and enemy designs, beautiful artwork of Columbia, Vigors and propaganda posters and advertisments from the game are all found here for our enjoyment. While I'd definitely recommend the book to anyone (BioShock fans in particular), I warn anyone that playing 'BioShock Infinite' will evoke mixed reactions to this book. On one hand, you get an appreciation of how different the finished game is to the original 'BioShock', despite the similar starting point brought out in the initial designs and concept in the book. On the other hand, you become somewhat frustrated that the creative process which led to some great concepts in the finalised game is not covered here. For instance, I love the Luteces and think they were an innovative element, but they only get one image each in an entire book which are not even labelled as such. I couldn't help but compare to another Dark Horse art book I own which told me so much about the creative process. To add insult to injury, Ken Levine wrote a great introduction which just scratched the surface of this aspect. So it's still a brilliant book overall with stunning artwork, but could have been a bit better if the creative process were described in more detail.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    After reading/going through this book, I want nothing more than to go play some more of the game. Yes, for those of you unaware, Bioshock: Infinite is a 2013 released video game. Both similar and yet very different from the original Bioshock games. The art here is incredible. When playing the game, it is easy to miss things are the scene is constantly changing. This give you the change to really stop and look. Especially at some of the enemies you fight. This book really breaks down how things w After reading/going through this book, I want nothing more than to go play some more of the game. Yes, for those of you unaware, Bioshock: Infinite is a 2013 released video game. Both similar and yet very different from the original Bioshock games. The art here is incredible. When playing the game, it is easy to miss things are the scene is constantly changing. This give you the change to really stop and look. Especially at some of the enemies you fight. This book really breaks down how things work. Details drawings of weapon's parts, enemies, characters and more. They even show how the architecture for the game was done. I loved how we get to see all the initial drawing concepts for Elizabeth. How they toyed with various ages, clothing, hairstyles, etc. Very enjoyable to look at. Also very cool was how we get to see things that ultimately didn't make it into the game, such as extra enemies. My only real complaint is that I would have liked to see more time put to use in explained what I was sometimes looking at. Where an idea came from, etc. The books Shows so much, but Tells so little. A better blend would have nice. Not much time spent actually reading. Lots of time looking at fantastic drawings! Nicely done.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    Bioshock Infinite was an average game set in an amazing, beautiful world. This is an average book detailing the creation of that world. Considering how much the environment and design of Columbia made the game, I would think a book of concept art would have more inspiring images of it. But this book is broken down into chapters focusing on different pieces (like characters, vigors, weapons, etc.) and manages to not capture the world of Bioshock Infinite as much as I hoped it would. What's here i Bioshock Infinite was an average game set in an amazing, beautiful world. This is an average book detailing the creation of that world. Considering how much the environment and design of Columbia made the game, I would think a book of concept art would have more inspiring images of it. But this book is broken down into chapters focusing on different pieces (like characters, vigors, weapons, etc.) and manages to not capture the world of Bioshock Infinite as much as I hoped it would. What's here is nice, but it doesn't feel like there's enough, and I'm sure there's all kind of additional concept art that was left out that would have been better used than pages of minor variations of vigor containers (seriously - 30+ variations of one vigor design, a quarter of which are functionally identical? Not space well used). What it comes down to for me is that I should see images I want on my walls when I'm reading an art book, and there weren't many if any. And there's hardly any real information in here; the occasional details about the designs are sparse and weirdly uninformative. It's okay for Bioshock Infinite fans, but wouldn't really sell it to anyone else. Although it does kind of make me want to play the game again, so maybe it does serve its purpose.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael Alexander

    Bioshock Infinite is a beautiful game. While playing it there were many times I found myself stopping just to take in the scenery. It always amazes how much art there is in a game like that. This book does a good job of showing that, but it also shows the other side, how much art is left out. Elizabeth, one of the main characters, for example went through hundreds of iterations before her final look was approved. There are sketches for tons of enemies and characters that didn't make it into the f Bioshock Infinite is a beautiful game. While playing it there were many times I found myself stopping just to take in the scenery. It always amazes how much art there is in a game like that. This book does a good job of showing that, but it also shows the other side, how much art is left out. Elizabeth, one of the main characters, for example went through hundreds of iterations before her final look was approved. There are sketches for tons of enemies and characters that didn't make it into the final game. It's all really good stuff.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Although the actual gameplay mechanics of bioshock infinite are perfectly fine, it's the game world itself and the associated art and characters that make it worth playing. As such this book is well worth reading, especially in the way it reveals fascinating ideas and drafts that never made it into the game itself.

  14. 4 out of 5

    kfpotters

    Bioshock will forever and always be my favourite video game series. This book not only featured breathtaking artwork but a look into the world of Bioshock, how it came to be. The sheer effort and creativity that is bleed from the animators and artists here is astounding. I have never been so enthralled and moved by a paper to screen process before in my life. Bioshock will always be more than just a video game and this book will always be more than just a showcase of concept art. It’s a full blo Bioshock will forever and always be my favourite video game series. This book not only featured breathtaking artwork but a look into the world of Bioshock, how it came to be. The sheer effort and creativity that is bleed from the animators and artists here is astounding. I have never been so enthralled and moved by a paper to screen process before in my life. Bioshock will always be more than just a video game and this book will always be more than just a showcase of concept art. It’s a full blown masterpiece. 10/5.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anna Heidick

    Interesting character concepts and art. Plenty of creativity.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Porter

    Just wanted to look through this again. I always enjoy looking through artbooks for my fav video games.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Gibson

    Really enjoyed the artwork

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rob Barry

    I love the game and the art!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    I loved the game and I've seen some of the stunning concept art around the internets and I'm surprised I didn't get this deluxe hardcover book sooner, which was languishing in my Amazon wishlist for a while before I finally got round to buying it, and now that I have, it's a very welcome addition to my art book shelf! Published by Dark Horse, each of the 184 pages are jam packed with gorgeous concept art from the game. The artwork, of course, speaks for itself, covering a full page and often spre I loved the game and I've seen some of the stunning concept art around the internets and I'm surprised I didn't get this deluxe hardcover book sooner, which was languishing in my Amazon wishlist for a while before I finally got round to buying it, and now that I have, it's a very welcome addition to my art book shelf! Published by Dark Horse, each of the 184 pages are jam packed with gorgeous concept art from the game. The artwork, of course, speaks for itself, covering a full page and often spread over two, but never looking messy or as if it's been squeezed to fit on the page, and is accompanied by some commentary and annotated handwritten text, although not much. This is definitely an art book! The early part of the book, after the introduction from lead writer on the game, Ken Levine, starts with the concepts of the main characters Elizabeth and Booker DeWitt, along with early art of Songbird, the population and items of Columbia and the heavy hitters. I always find it fascinating to see the original concept art of characters and environments and the way they sometimes evolve until you see them in the finished game or movie. And this is no different in 'Bioshock Infinite'. It seems they had a clear vision of who Elizabeth and Booker were from the off, with not too many changes from the original concept art. The heavy hitters seemed to go through the biggest changes, as the original concept art came across as much more gory and a bit far removed from the enemies you finally encounter in the game. I have a thing for vintage art and advertisements, so I enjoyed that section of the book. A whole chapter on the advertisements and propaganda posters, with most of the images being full page spreads and looking very nice too, with lots of detail! I have The Art Of The Mass Effect Universe, also published by Dark Horse, and this book follows in it's footsteps with a superb exploration of the art and design that went into creating one of this year's best games, 'Bioshock Infinite'. If you're a fan of the game and enjoyed it's visuals, you'll enjoy flicking through these pages. Don't forget to take a peek under the slipcover for an embossed vintage engraved style on the hardcover, an extra visual treat.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nick Turner

    Some double page spreads. Drawings and CGI. A contents listing chapters. A one page text introduction describes the ideas behind the concept art. Ideas and experiments which evolved into the final project - a video game. As stills on the page the steam punkish semi-mechanised figures look impossibly heavy, but mobile and animated in the video game they are incredibly dynamic, flying around like monkeys swinging in the trees. Some art pages have inline notes or an italicised explanatory paragraph Some double page spreads. Drawings and CGI. A contents listing chapters. A one page text introduction describes the ideas behind the concept art. Ideas and experiments which evolved into the final project - a video game. As stills on the page the steam punkish semi-mechanised figures look impossibly heavy, but mobile and animated in the video game they are incredibly dynamic, flying around like monkeys swinging in the trees. Some art pages have inline notes or an italicised explanatory paragraph. Noir urban scenes. Dark grimy buildings with boarded up windows. Signs with letters out of kilter, partly lit. Then the brilliant boulevards of the High Street, figures in Victorian dress. A balloonist without a basket, suspended in a riveted golden diving suit with robot digits. A purple, bulbous-eyed, corpselike, Victorian child pointing at a dragonfly. Grotesques - facial tumours, asymmetrically repeated organs. Cannibal monsters. Necromancy. Mechanical giant crab mecha. Dangerous toys. Heavy mothmen like Morlock angels. Mecha spirit worms. There is a chapter for each main character Booker, Elizabeth and Songbird. Elizabeth. Neo-Victorian fashion spread. Large-eyed Doll-like (reminding of clown's) make-up. Alternative Elizabeths. Funny childhood pictures. Drawn more dramatically in other sections in scenes with other characters. A blue Mason-inspired face-concealing hooded suit reminds of the white uniform of racial chauvinist militias - this could be intentional as the characters are baddies. After a few pages in which the character Daisy Fitzroy is depicted as having a deep-tan appearance, a page of alternative character sketches seem to use a different model, although different lighting might explain some of the difference. Later pages depicting Fitzroy's rise to leadership of the Vox use the former model. With hulking arms and dark eye pits it's easy to imagine the Vox as zombies. A porcelain-faced robot Lincoln with red (Devil's) goat ears. I read a review copy from the publisher.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Parka

    ( More pictures on my blog ) A lot of games these days have pretty weird characters. BioShock is one of them with its own kind of weirdness, especially the characters. This is a large 184-page hardcover concept artbook published by Dark Horse. The concept art features the environment, characters, weapons and other props such as propaganda posters. I like the environment art for the floating city of Columbia. It's beautiful yet mysterious. There's plenty of character art, that of Elizabeth, Bo ( More pictures on my blog ) A lot of games these days have pretty weird characters. BioShock is one of them with its own kind of weirdness, especially the characters. This is a large 184-page hardcover concept artbook published by Dark Horse. The concept art features the environment, characters, weapons and other props such as propaganda posters. I like the environment art for the floating city of Columbia. It's beautiful yet mysterious. There's plenty of character art, that of Elizabeth, Booker, Songbird and many of the grotesque and mechanical enemies, Heavy Hitters It makes you wonder about the twisted minds of those in Columbia who created these monstrous beings. They have included quite a bit of discarded art that couldn't make it to the game as well. The art is accompanied by some commentary and annotated handwritten text. No much. If you've not played the game, it's quite impossible to know what the game is about by looking at the art. It's a nice companion video game artbook, but overall, I felt the art is not as refine as Deco Devolution: The Art of BioShock 2 , but this is also sort of a different title.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    [4.5/5 stars rounded up to 5/5.] Beautiful beautiful beautiful! I LOVED this. I played the OST while listening to this which definitely set the mood. (I recommend doing that for anyone who wants to read this.) I really enjoyed reading all the little notes the artists left by their artwork, made me chuckle a few times since I do that myself and it's always funny seeing other artists doing the same. It was really neat seeing all the early concepts and how they shaped the game. The colors were all v [4.5/5 stars rounded up to 5/5.] Beautiful beautiful beautiful! I LOVED this. I played the OST while listening to this which definitely set the mood. (I recommend doing that for anyone who wants to read this.) I really enjoyed reading all the little notes the artists left by their artwork, made me chuckle a few times since I do that myself and it's always funny seeing other artists doing the same. It was really neat seeing all the early concepts and how they shaped the game. The colors were all vibrant and the pictures were very crisp and high quality. It's quite a well made book. My gripes: -It felt too short. I would've loved to see more artwork and read more commentary. Especially for the main characters. (The Luteces' only had half a page! Come on, I'm sure there was more of them drawn!) Even more scenery from other levels, they only showed a spare few. :/ -Some of the artworks spanned over the spine so it made it difficult to see the some of the images without really flattening the book (and I'd hate to damage it) but this is almost inevitable for art books. :c -Some mention of the artists would have been nice to see too. I'd love to know who drew what and a bit more detail about that. (I guess that goes back to "more commentary" ^^; ) -Did I mention it needs more? This really deserves a volume 2 ;) Despite those issues, it's still worth the purchase. The artwork is all lovely and beautiful, it's really interesting to learn about their process and see what changes characters and things in the game went through.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    I've been anxiously awaiting Bioshock Infinite since I like, even heard about the project. I've played Bioshock and Bioshock 2, and I loved them. I bought the action figures, and I have a splicer mask and the creepy as hell soundtracks. These games definitely deserve to be called art even by the most fogey and snotty of critics. I mean, it looks damn beautiful, there's a story that I would read as a novel, and it's playable! What more do they want? But you know, some people see something digital I've been anxiously awaiting Bioshock Infinite since I like, even heard about the project. I've played Bioshock and Bioshock 2, and I loved them. I bought the action figures, and I have a splicer mask and the creepy as hell soundtracks. These games definitely deserve to be called art even by the most fogey and snotty of critics. I mean, it looks damn beautiful, there's a story that I would read as a novel, and it's playable! What more do they want? But you know, some people see something digital and think robots did all the work. Honestly, I think I can show this book to someone and say, "See? It was someone's idea! A human being had to think it up and then make it! Sure, they used digital tools, but it's not like I make my own paint and pencils." OMG I want to play Bioshock Infinite right now. I was worried about this book spoiling the game, but it doesn't cover the narrative at all. Lots of character and environment design ideas are shared, but not plot details. I received an ARC from netgalley in pdf form, which I think is perfect for the digital paintings. A digital artist told me that what he felt he was doing was painting with light. The art was great but I wonder how well these will translate to print though; sometimes I've noticed that digital art gets too dark when they are on paper instead of on a lit screen. Which I can understand; the page isn't the natural medium for it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    An excellent look at the artistic evolution of one of the most visually creative games, Bioshock Infinite. Irrational Games has created unique and immersive environments and horrifying opponents for their Bioshock games and the newest game is no exception. The book begins with a forward by Ken Levine who is Creative Director at Irrational Games. He discusses the perception of the creative process and the reality. It's a one page introduction, but one of the best I've read recently. From there, as An excellent look at the artistic evolution of one of the most visually creative games, Bioshock Infinite. Irrational Games has created unique and immersive environments and horrifying opponents for their Bioshock games and the newest game is no exception. The book begins with a forward by Ken Levine who is Creative Director at Irrational Games. He discusses the perception of the creative process and the reality. It's a one page introduction, but one of the best I've read recently. From there, aspects of the game are presented, mostly in their idea form. There are early design concepts and treatments for the main characters Booker DeWitt and Elizabeth as well as finished drawings. The evolution of the floating city, Columbia is shown, as well as Songbird, the Vox Populi, enemies you will encounter and normal citizens. Also included are the weapons, devices and machines encountered throughout the game. The section showing the Vigors bottles is particularly beautiful. Everything is presented from sketches to watercolors to finished digital rendering. The art is detailed and beautiful and shows why their games are so popular. If you think video games lack creativity, this book should give you a different view. Now I can't wait to play this newest entry in the Bioshock franchise.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Popzara Press

    Dark Horse Comics' gorgeous gathering offers insight into the floating metropolis and expands upon questions you may have had while playing the game and those that arose upon completion. The stunning cover featuring the shorn-haired Elizabeth nuzzling the terrifying Songbird is a great introduction to what will follow in the pages themselves. After a brief note by creative director Ken Levine, readers are plunged into the dark, varied world of Columbia with character illustrations, early design Dark Horse Comics' gorgeous gathering offers insight into the floating metropolis and expands upon questions you may have had while playing the game and those that arose upon completion. The stunning cover featuring the shorn-haired Elizabeth nuzzling the terrifying Songbird is a great introduction to what will follow in the pages themselves. After a brief note by creative director Ken Levine, readers are plunged into the dark, varied world of Columbia with character illustrations, early design prototypes, and the evolution of specific landmarks players interact with often in the game. The Art of BioShock Infinite Review on Popzara

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Purdy

    Excellent quick read - more of a "look at" book. But it does include quite a bit of text that discusses some of the design tradeoffs during the Bioshock Infinite game development. But the real star here are the large full page color images. Quite fascinating to look over. Some of the best parts of the book are when they show character or design changes over time so you can see what never made it to the game. After reading, I went back to this game and started playing it again, which was made qui Excellent quick read - more of a "look at" book. But it does include quite a bit of text that discusses some of the design tradeoffs during the Bioshock Infinite game development. But the real star here are the large full page color images. Quite fascinating to look over. Some of the best parts of the book are when they show character or design changes over time so you can see what never made it to the game. After reading, I went back to this game and started playing it again, which was made quite more insightful based on the text and images.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Yakult Boy

    Fantastic artbook that features both final and developmental work on Bioshock Infinte. You can really get a feel for the changes in direction and the kind of work that is put behind settings and characters. The book features developmental art for characters, enemies, settings and weapons. My only issue is that I would have loved it if they featured more of the propaganda art that was in the game, and maybe some more character art (other than that of Elizabeth and Booker).

  28. 5 out of 5

    Scott wachter

    just beautiful, the game was astounding but this book surpasses even that. There's some interesting comments from members if the design team. I really wish a lot of the content in this book had made it to the final game.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    A gift from my son and daughter-in-law for Christmas. I love all the Bioshock games, and one of the few series I have played all 3 of and finished all of them. The art book for Infinite was very enjoyable. Interesting seeing how the world evolved. Goes well with my other art books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Beautiful artwork, but considering that I've yet to play the game, it didn't really do anything for me. It does peak my interest a little though. I received an advanced reader's copy from NetGalley. Thanks!

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