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Can Orthodox Christianity offer spiritual resources uniquely suited to the environmental concerns of today? This book makes the case emphatically that it can indeed. In addition to being the first substantial and comprehensive collection of essays, in any language, to address environmental issues from the Orthodox point of view, this volume (with contributions from many of Can Orthodox Christianity offer spiritual resources uniquely suited to the environmental concerns of today? This book makes the case emphatically that it can indeed. In addition to being the first substantial and comprehensive collection of essays, in any language, to address environmental issues from the Orthodox point of view, this volume (with contributions from many of the most influential theologians and philosophers in contemporary world Orthodoxy) will engage a wide audience, in academic as well as popular circles--resonating not only with Orthodox audiences but with all those in search of a fresh approach to environmental theory and ethics that can bring to bear the resources of ancient spirituality, often virtually unknown in the West, on modern challenges and dilemmas.


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Can Orthodox Christianity offer spiritual resources uniquely suited to the environmental concerns of today? This book makes the case emphatically that it can indeed. In addition to being the first substantial and comprehensive collection of essays, in any language, to address environmental issues from the Orthodox point of view, this volume (with contributions from many of Can Orthodox Christianity offer spiritual resources uniquely suited to the environmental concerns of today? This book makes the case emphatically that it can indeed. In addition to being the first substantial and comprehensive collection of essays, in any language, to address environmental issues from the Orthodox point of view, this volume (with contributions from many of the most influential theologians and philosophers in contemporary world Orthodoxy) will engage a wide audience, in academic as well as popular circles--resonating not only with Orthodox audiences but with all those in search of a fresh approach to environmental theory and ethics that can bring to bear the resources of ancient spirituality, often virtually unknown in the West, on modern challenges and dilemmas.

33 review for Toward an Ecology of Transfiguration: Orthodox Christian Perspectives on Environment, Nature, and Creation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ted

    This is a book that I thought I would be more interested in than turned out to be true. I hear a lot about the "Green" Patriarch Bartholomew. Some of the articles were too scholarly and did not hold my interest. I guess some of the issue was that nothing written here shed any new light on anything for me. Sometimes I felt like the author had an environmentalist bent and simply put an Orthodox theological sheen on it - usually finding some quote from a Patristic writer or saint that seemed to sup This is a book that I thought I would be more interested in than turned out to be true. I hear a lot about the "Green" Patriarch Bartholomew. Some of the articles were too scholarly and did not hold my interest. I guess some of the issue was that nothing written here shed any new light on anything for me. Sometimes I felt like the author had an environmentalist bent and simply put an Orthodox theological sheen on it - usually finding some quote from a Patristic writer or saint that seemed to support their position. Sometimes I thought the articles stretched credulity a bit by trying to show that the Orthodox Church or Patristic writers were environmentalists before there even was environmentalism. It is as if we Orthodox cannot be environmentalists unless there is some Patristic support for the idea. I finished the book several weeks ago and never got around to reviewing it, so now I'm even a bit fuzzy about the book, which itself says something. There are a few good quotes from Patristic sources but along the way I felt there were simply too many articles in the book which didn't say all that much different from one another. What I get out of the book is something like: We shouldn't be environmentalists because of what secular environmentalists tell us because Western Christian thinking is often mistaken and secular thinking is wrong, but we should be environmentalists because we can find (if we search hard enough) some Patristic writings which we can interpret as environmentalistic.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Coatney

    Like any collection of essays, there are hits and misses with this anthology. I was particularly impressed with the first half of the book, which focused on "Environment, Nature, and Creation in Patristic and 20th Century Orthodox Thought," perhaps because these areas of focus didn't require the more political/social commentary more commonly found in the second half of the book. These discussions are important, too, but not as pertinent to my reasons for reading this book. The reprint of Donald Like any collection of essays, there are hits and misses with this anthology. I was particularly impressed with the first half of the book, which focused on "Environment, Nature, and Creation in Patristic and 20th Century Orthodox Thought," perhaps because these areas of focus didn't require the more political/social commentary more commonly found in the second half of the book. These discussions are important, too, but not as pertinent to my reasons for reading this book. The reprint of Donald Sheehan's essay "The Spirit of God Moved Upon the Face of the Waters: Orthodox Holiness and the Natural World" was an outstanding way to close the book. As a veterinarian, I'm especially interested in the implications of veterinary care in a Christian context, and I was not disappointed in insights gleaned from this book. Much of it involves the patristic understanding of the logoi of things, of the essence/energies distinctions, and of the concept of hierarchies found in Maximos, Palamas, Dionysios, and others. I'll be referring back to this book frequently when the time comes to work more extensively on a theology of veterinary care.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Roland Clark

    The contributors to Toward an Ecology of Transfiguration (2013) are some of the most celebrated and erudite scholars in the Eastern Orthodox world and they use their brief chapters to explain how the vision of the Church Fathers and of leading twentieth-century theologians Eyesshould cause us to approach the earth differently. “The problem facing theologians,” Savas Agouridis writes, “is that all environmentalists, irrespective of their school of thought, are “biocentrically” and not theological The contributors to Toward an Ecology of Transfiguration (2013) are some of the most celebrated and erudite scholars in the Eastern Orthodox world and they use their brief chapters to explain how the vision of the Church Fathers and of leading twentieth-century theologians Eyesshould cause us to approach the earth differently. “The problem facing theologians,” Savas Agouridis writes, “is that all environmentalists, irrespective of their school of thought, are “biocentrically” and not theologically oriented.” This volume sets out to change that, putting God at the center of an Orthodox eco-theology. Read my full review here: http://wordsbecamebooks.com/2015/02/1...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walker

    This could have been an exceptional collection, and it turned out to be, unfortunately, so-so. Too many "theologians", and not enough Orthodox scientists. Found a real howler in one paper, it had to do with DDT. Having read other Orthodox scientists, I know we can do better. The Church needs to encourage the development of scientists who are well read in theology and Priests and academic theologians who have a strong understanding of science so that Orthodoxy can contribute to the issues facing This could have been an exceptional collection, and it turned out to be, unfortunately, so-so. Too many "theologians", and not enough Orthodox scientists. Found a real howler in one paper, it had to do with DDT. Having read other Orthodox scientists, I know we can do better. The Church needs to encourage the development of scientists who are well read in theology and Priests and academic theologians who have a strong understanding of science so that Orthodoxy can contribute to the issues facing mankind.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cory Dupont

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bishoy Dawood

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Roberts

  8. 5 out of 5

    Margot

  9. 5 out of 5

    SSC

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bishoy Dawood

  11. 4 out of 5

    Becky

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  13. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  14. 4 out of 5

    Peter Schweitzer

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lance

  16. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  17. 5 out of 5

    Landon

  18. 4 out of 5

    Josh Tegart

  19. 4 out of 5

    April

  20. 5 out of 5

    T.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sunon Nandy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt Nesbitt

  23. 5 out of 5

    Prarthini

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Gikas

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Alexandra-Diana

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ramses Prashad

  27. 4 out of 5

    Helen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aubrey

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  31. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  32. 4 out of 5

    Molly Gartland

  33. 4 out of 5

    Mika

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