counter create hit The Russian Default and the Contagion to Brazil - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Russian Default and the Contagion to Brazil

Availability: Ready to download

In the aftermath of the Russian crisis of August 1998, a series of events led to the Brazilian crisis that culminated in the floating of the real on January 1999. The timing of the events led academic and policy making observers to suspect that there was a contagion from the Russian crisis to Brazil. If true, the transmission of pressure from Russia to Brazil would be some In the aftermath of the Russian crisis of August 1998, a series of events led to the Brazilian crisis that culminated in the floating of the real on January 1999. The timing of the events led academic and policy making observers to suspect that there was a contagion from the Russian crisis to Brazil. If true, the transmission of pressure from Russia to Brazil would be somewhat of a special case among the financial crises episodes seen in the 1990s. In contrast to the Mexican (1994) and Thai (1997) crises, the Russian contagion to Brazil appears to have crossed regional borders, leading to a number of interesting questions. Given the lack of substantial trade and direct financial linkages, why did the Russian devaluation prompt capital flight from Brazil? Why did some countries with similar fundamentals and economic links did not have a crisis (as for example Hungary)? In this paper, we attempt to verify the contagion presumption, and analyze related issues that can shed light on our current understanding of financial crises and contagion.


Compare
Ads Banner

In the aftermath of the Russian crisis of August 1998, a series of events led to the Brazilian crisis that culminated in the floating of the real on January 1999. The timing of the events led academic and policy making observers to suspect that there was a contagion from the Russian crisis to Brazil. If true, the transmission of pressure from Russia to Brazil would be some In the aftermath of the Russian crisis of August 1998, a series of events led to the Brazilian crisis that culminated in the floating of the real on January 1999. The timing of the events led academic and policy making observers to suspect that there was a contagion from the Russian crisis to Brazil. If true, the transmission of pressure from Russia to Brazil would be somewhat of a special case among the financial crises episodes seen in the 1990s. In contrast to the Mexican (1994) and Thai (1997) crises, the Russian contagion to Brazil appears to have crossed regional borders, leading to a number of interesting questions. Given the lack of substantial trade and direct financial linkages, why did the Russian devaluation prompt capital flight from Brazil? Why did some countries with similar fundamentals and economic links did not have a crisis (as for example Hungary)? In this paper, we attempt to verify the contagion presumption, and analyze related issues that can shed light on our current understanding of financial crises and contagion.

0 review for The Russian Default and the Contagion to Brazil

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.