counter create hit City of God - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

City of God

Availability: Ready to download

The searing novel on which the internationally acclaimed hit film was based, City of God is a gritty, gorgeous tour de force from the Brazilian street. Cicade de Deus, the City of God, is one of Rio's most notorious slums. Yet it is also a place where samba rocks till dawn, where the women are the most beautiful on earth, and where one young man wants to escape his backgro The searing novel on which the internationally acclaimed hit film was based, City of God is a gritty, gorgeous tour de force from the Brazilian street. Cicade de Deus, the City of God, is one of Rio's most notorious slums. Yet it is also a place where samba rocks till dawn, where the women are the most beautiful on earth, and where one young man wants to escape his background and become a photographer. City of God is a sprawling, magnificently told epic about gang life in Rio's favelas, based on years of research and Pualo Lins's firsthand experience growing up in Cicade de Deus. A book that gives voice to the dispossessed of multiethnic Brazil, City of God will earn Paulo Lins more well-deserved international acclaim.


Compare

The searing novel on which the internationally acclaimed hit film was based, City of God is a gritty, gorgeous tour de force from the Brazilian street. Cicade de Deus, the City of God, is one of Rio's most notorious slums. Yet it is also a place where samba rocks till dawn, where the women are the most beautiful on earth, and where one young man wants to escape his backgro The searing novel on which the internationally acclaimed hit film was based, City of God is a gritty, gorgeous tour de force from the Brazilian street. Cicade de Deus, the City of God, is one of Rio's most notorious slums. Yet it is also a place where samba rocks till dawn, where the women are the most beautiful on earth, and where one young man wants to escape his background and become a photographer. City of God is a sprawling, magnificently told epic about gang life in Rio's favelas, based on years of research and Pualo Lins's firsthand experience growing up in Cicade de Deus. A book that gives voice to the dispossessed of multiethnic Brazil, City of God will earn Paulo Lins more well-deserved international acclaim.

30 review for City of God

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Berry

    After reading "City of God" my perception has definitely changed in the way that MEN, no, BOYS...are so easily swayed by evil and the evils of the world. The young men in the book succumbed to be products of their harsh environment because their mentality was "kill or be killed" or "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em." The novel was written in a way where there was not a particular "linear" story line. It was scattered and jumpy which added to Brazil's City of God's unpredictable and disheartening After reading "City of God" my perception has definitely changed in the way that MEN, no, BOYS...are so easily swayed by evil and the evils of the world. The young men in the book succumbed to be products of their harsh environment because their mentality was "kill or be killed" or "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em." The novel was written in a way where there was not a particular "linear" story line. It was scattered and jumpy which added to Brazil's City of God's unpredictable and disheartening activity. I definitely walked away from this book with a better understanding of God and the importance of GOD in one's life. I also finished this book knowing that some people out there in the world are lost souls and need love and prayer in their lives. I don't know what evil kept the young men in the horrible positions they were in but whatever it was, it wasn't there to help them or bring them to a place of "happiness" in the end. I originally picked up this book as a result of being UNSUCCESSFUL with finding the movie - that a late friend of mine INSISTED (right before he passed) that I see. I am GLAD that I was only able to get the book because I definitely got an in depth look at the heartache of evil and it's huge influence and brainwash of the youth. Although it was very gruesome at times, and sometimes I had to put the book down, I recommend this book to anyone who is curious to know how loss of life, mentality, and youth affects a community - a city. Enjoy :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bianca

    Not comparable to the film, by any means. In this ONE case, the film is probably better than the book. With that said, the film wouldn't be so great if the book wasn't written first, to provide a story for the film to be based off of. And yes, I just ended that sentence with a preposition. :) At any rate, the book has soooo many characters (almost like a Tolstoy novel!) and people are dying at an unhealthy rate, it's a little difficult to keep track of who wronged who and who's serving up revenge Not comparable to the film, by any means. In this ONE case, the film is probably better than the book. With that said, the film wouldn't be so great if the book wasn't written first, to provide a story for the film to be based off of. And yes, I just ended that sentence with a preposition. :) At any rate, the book has soooo many characters (almost like a Tolstoy novel!) and people are dying at an unhealthy rate, it's a little difficult to keep track of who wronged who and who's serving up revenge for what. Perhaps if I had read the book before watching the film (courtesy of a Portuguese language class in college), I might have had a different feeling about the book, but alas...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Krestan

    The dumbest ending I have ever read in a book. However, the action was dark and fast paced and I did find myself in shock/awe/disgust at different point in the novels. Everyone died (ehh for the most part) except for the person I really wanted to which was annoying. I stopped reading for a while and tried to pick it back up but I struggled because I really forgot where I left off- try to read it straight though. Still a good book though, very vivid descriptions.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ka’leneReads

    Film definitely better

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marija I

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. City of God - a moving depiction of gangster life in the Brazilian Favelas. We follow the story of 3 main gangster characters during he 60's, 70's and 80s. Their rise to power, money and influence as well as their tragic ending. Thoroughout this novel, we really become immersed and learn how the other side lives... their sufferring, their struggle, their vionence and their poverty becomes our own. The reason I gave it three rather than 5 stars, is due to the lack of a protagonist... I would have City of God - a moving depiction of gangster life in the Brazilian Favelas. We follow the story of 3 main gangster characters during he 60's, 70's and 80s. Their rise to power, money and influence as well as their tragic ending. Thoroughout this novel, we really become immersed and learn how the other side lives... their sufferring, their struggle, their vionence and their poverty becomes our own. The reason I gave it three rather than 5 stars, is due to the lack of a protagonist... I would have liked the character and story of Rocket more pronounced. How a 'good' and 'honest' man survived in a place like that! Furthermore, a development of 'why' the children become who they become.... 'how' the alternative would affect ... What sort of families they come from... etc. Overall - a good read though...It gave me an insight into life in the Brazilian favelas as well as general metality of those people.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Weinman

    Thoroughly enjoyed this. While the plot may be confusing, the main theme of violence through adversity and evil as a mainstay (in the slums) is well expressed and carried through the generations - this is evident when depicting characters who have known nothing but corruption, violence and squalor for their respective lives. Despite the convoluted plot, it's entertaining enough to follow and you can't help but feel for so many characters and their plight. Maybe the translation from Portuguese to Thoroughly enjoyed this. While the plot may be confusing, the main theme of violence through adversity and evil as a mainstay (in the slums) is well expressed and carried through the generations - this is evident when depicting characters who have known nothing but corruption, violence and squalor for their respective lives. Despite the convoluted plot, it's entertaining enough to follow and you can't help but feel for so many characters and their plight. Maybe the translation from Portuguese to English hindered the structure of the book and prose? Nonetheless, I loved it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lulu

    Wow!!! There was so much more violence in this book than in the movie. So many characters are introduced and killed off that it was hard for me to keep up, but overall it was the same nature of the movie and very realistic.

  8. 5 out of 5

    George

    An endless cycle of violence, some of which is quite disturbing. No plot at all.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jukka Kuva

    City of God was, and is, a place of endless violence. Mob bosses have way more power in the favela of Rio de Janeiro than brazilian government and they change on a weekly basis as a younger gangster decides to kill the old boss. Very few can escape the cycle. Paulo Lins was one of those few. When he had got out, he wrote a book about his childhood neighbourhood and things he saw. That book is City of God. Lins' writing is just like the story it tells. Very harsh. Plain dialogue, jumps from scene City of God was, and is, a place of endless violence. Mob bosses have way more power in the favela of Rio de Janeiro than brazilian government and they change on a weekly basis as a younger gangster decides to kill the old boss. Very few can escape the cycle. Paulo Lins was one of those few. When he had got out, he wrote a book about his childhood neighbourhood and things he saw. That book is City of God. Lins' writing is just like the story it tells. Very harsh. Plain dialogue, jumps from scene to scene. Brutal descriptions of deaths of gangsters. The story doesn't need fancy text structure or sophisticated words. There's no need to smoothen the edges from a rough story. The fact, that things Lins writes about really do happen, makes the book a lot more touching. All those lives wasted and people killed for nothing. Collateral damage in a war is a meaningful death compared to this. You should do things the other way around than I and read the book first, then see the movie. You'll value the book more and get some things from the movie better.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna (DoesAnnaDreamOf)

    As a literary work, I’ve found few redeemable qualities to City of God. There is no clear storyline, too many characters and no transitions whatsoever between the scenes. It is so confusing to follow. However, its vivid descriptions create a realistic vision of the lives in the favelas. Violence, revenge and corruption are omnipresent and deeply interwoven. It’s heartbreaking at times, and it’s revolting at other times.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Justė

    Contemporary Brazilian literature at its finest. Although the second part dragged a bit, I can see it becoming a modern classic. Read and then go watch the film adaptation. Or both. Or either.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura Walton

    An amazing book about the crime that brews in Rio's favelas. The movie adaptation is engaging and an ode to seventies youth culture. An amazing book about the crime that brews in Rio's favelas. The movie adaptation is engaging and an ode to seventies youth culture.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul Steer

    Grew some graphic reading , but strangely compelling

  14. 5 out of 5

    Realini

    City of God, written by Braulio Mantovani, based on the novel by Paulo Lins, directed by Fernando Meirelles and Katia Lund 9 out of 10 Notes and thoughts on other books are available at: - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... and http://realini.blogspot.ro/ Critics and audiences agree on Cidade de Deus. The public has rated this violent, extraordinary film at number 21: http://www.imdb.com/chart/top?ref_=tt... And TIME magazine has included this motion picture on its All-TIME 100 Movies list: - htt City of God, written by Braulio Mantovani, based on the novel by Paulo Lins, directed by Fernando Meirelles and Katia Lund 9 out of 10 Notes and thoughts on other books are available at: - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... and http://realini.blogspot.ro/ Critics and audiences agree on Cidade de Deus. The public has rated this violent, extraordinary film at number 21: http://www.imdb.com/chart/top?ref_=tt... And TIME magazine has included this motion picture on its All-TIME 100 Movies list: - http://entertainment.time.com/2005/02... And City of God was nominated for four Academy Awards, in the year when Lord of the Rings took so many prizes. In my book, Cidade de Deus is better than the winner of the Oscar for best motion picture and the director prize for that year. Having said that, it must be added that this film is quite difficult to watch in many if not most of its scenes. From the start, I think we are shown how they kill a live chicken on camera and if not all the blood and death dance, at the very least, the images of the seemingly still warm body and the plucking of feathers are gruesome. Veganism is the way out. One bird gets away and a whole band of children mostly runs after the animal, which escapes miraculously. “What should have been swift revenge turned into an all-out war. The City of God was divided. You couldn't go from one section the other, not even to visit a relative. The cops considered anyone living in the slum a hoodlum. People got used to living in Vietnam, and more and more volunteers signed up to die.” It all happens in the poor slums of Rio de Janeiro, where rival gangs fight with no mercy and apparently no mercy. In one scene, Li’l Ze, perhaps the cruelest, most despicable of the killers involved, catches a few children. True, there appears to be no lower limit to adhere to a gang or just start with a few buddies to rob stores. Li’l Ze is the leader of most of the City of God, at least for a period, having killed rivals and leaders of various territories. When he has the two kids in front of him, he is asking them to choose- leg or hand, for he will shoot them where they choose. And not just that, after the children, who are no more than six years old, are shot in the foot, in spite of choosing the hand this Godfather has other ideas. He picks one of his upcoming underlings, another child, aged twelve maybe, who wants to be part of the gang and says to him - Now it’s your moment - You choose and kill one of them Being raised in this extremely violent environment, little boys become killers at a very tender age and they steal and fight. “Filé-com-Fritas - Steak and Fries: A kid? I smoke, I snort. I've killed and robbed. I'm a man.” And most of the other characters have the same point of view. Peaceful bystanders cannot stay of this all out, continuous war, for they get trapped and killed without any remorse. In one instance, Li’l Ze and his band attack a young man and his girlfriend- the narrator explains that this is the only way the gang leader knows to get close to a girl and the general attitude is one of sexist, macho chauvinist males. After he abuses and rapes the girl, beats the young man, the crazy mobster stops away from the scene of his crime and thinks- “why didn’t I kill that dude?!” So he goes to his house, shouts that he wants the boy out, his brother comes and tries to reason with the gang of maybe 30 killers. Unsatisfied, they kill the brother and start a shooting spree, covering the poor house in a rain of bullets, killing an uncle too. The police are not just corrupt and involved in the drug trade and taking sides according to the pay off, but itself involved in killings.

  15. 5 out of 5

    S10_Matthew

    I watched the film version of City of God, directed by Fernando Meirelles. The film follows kids in the City of God, a slum of Rio de Janeiro. It is an unforgiving world, where people are raped and murdered on a whim. For example, Little Z, a leading gang lord, got his start after his older brother robs a brothel. As they leave, he walks in and murders everyone, laughing all the way. He is 9 years old at the time. The violence is relentless and even more jarring when juxtaposed with the scenes i I watched the film version of City of God, directed by Fernando Meirelles. The film follows kids in the City of God, a slum of Rio de Janeiro. It is an unforgiving world, where people are raped and murdered on a whim. For example, Little Z, a leading gang lord, got his start after his older brother robs a brothel. As they leave, he walks in and murders everyone, laughing all the way. He is 9 years old at the time. The violence is relentless and even more jarring when juxtaposed with the scenes in the actual economic center of Rio. The story is narrated by Rocket, a budding photographer who watches this all happen. Rocket is the slight chance of hope in a film of despondent futures. He does not have the stomach for murder and ends up becoming a known photographer and getting out of the slums. But he is in the resounding minority. Most of the gang members are killed by the end of film, and yet does this not result in the end of the violence. Our gang kingpin Little Z is murdered by a group of young laughing kids and that are not older than ten. And so the film ends as our older age of killers has been replaced by a younger crowd. A chilling statement to make about life in the slums. This is a tremendous film with a realism that speaks to the talents of the young actors and the honesty of the screenplay. It can be difficult to watch, but at the same time, it becomes impossible to look away. It would be terrific for a high school history class. The violence may be an issue, but is a facet of society that is often overlooked and needs to be seen. I would also recommend seeing another Meirelles film, The Constant Gardner, or City of God's recent sequel City of Men.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    I hate how much I love the movie for this novel, it's filmed incredibly well, tells a fascinating story and holds no punches. Now I realise just how faithful it is to the nearly 500 page novel, which is incredibly impressive once you realise the film is just a little over 2 hours long. But this isn't a review on the film, it's about the novel. Pablo Lins actually lived in the City of God in his youth, but managed to escape with his life and achieve better things. This non linear novel tells of th I hate how much I love the movie for this novel, it's filmed incredibly well, tells a fascinating story and holds no punches. Now I realise just how faithful it is to the nearly 500 page novel, which is incredibly impressive once you realise the film is just a little over 2 hours long. But this isn't a review on the film, it's about the novel. Pablo Lins actually lived in the City of God in his youth, but managed to escape with his life and achieve better things. This non linear novel tells of the gangster life during the sixties, seventies and early eighties, most of it actually happening in real life. The writing is straight to the point and flat and simple, just like the gangsters. It follows a pretty large amount of characters and in no particular order; multiple things can happen at one point in time. All the gangsters want is just money to buy nice things (help their families and drugs for themselves) and to be respected and in some cases feared. Only a few characters actually care that they kill people, while everyone else does it without a care in the world. There is no real character development. It's all just an odyssey into one of the greatest slums in the world. The book has a point of pointing out that those who leave the favela are more likely to survive, while basically everyone who stays has an unhappy ending to their story. It's brutal and disturbing, yet you can't help but read on, just to see what else happens in this hellhole. The film now holds so much more to me, and I won't forget this book for a long time, for good or for worse.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    An utterly different creature than the film, which merely mined it for a handful of snippets. By the first 50 pages we are already way beyond the thematic scope of the film which only sought to offend middle-class western standards of what is acceptable violence. The book goes far beyond this to paint a vast and intricate image of how poverty, drugs and gun violence, sustained over decades, creates a lethal -- yet mundane -- new grammar of interpersonal relations, where depth is replaced by d... An utterly different creature than the film, which merely mined it for a handful of snippets. By the first 50 pages we are already way beyond the thematic scope of the film which only sought to offend middle-class western standards of what is acceptable violence. The book goes far beyond this to paint a vast and intricate image of how poverty, drugs and gun violence, sustained over decades, creates a lethal -- yet mundane -- new grammar of interpersonal relations, where depth is replaced by d... (show more) An utterly different creature than the film, which merely mined it for a handful of snippets. By the first 50 pages we are already way beyond the thematic scope of the film which only sought to offend middle-class western standards of what is acceptable violence. The book goes far beyond this to paint a vast and intricate image of how poverty, drugs and gun violence, sustained over decades, creates a lethal -- yet mundane -- new grammar of interpersonal relations, where depth is replaced by death. It therefore sacrifices readability for some of us who have been trained through western story-telling structures to equate violent death with narrative climax.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. For the most part this was a very effectively shocking and disturbing account of life within the Brazilian CDD. Casual and frequent mentions of murders, drug abuse, drug dealing and rape initially shock and then desensitize readers, building up a vivid picture of lives so riddled with these activities that they become almost commonplace. The deeper shock comes from this desensitization as you realise as a reader, that you too have become accustomed to it. Having seen the film version first, I was For the most part this was a very effectively shocking and disturbing account of life within the Brazilian CDD. Casual and frequent mentions of murders, drug abuse, drug dealing and rape initially shock and then desensitize readers, building up a vivid picture of lives so riddled with these activities that they become almost commonplace. The deeper shock comes from this desensitization as you realise as a reader, that you too have become accustomed to it. Having seen the film version first, I was surprised when the book had a less strong single narrative around the character Rocket, and instead followed several narratives, probably the strongest being that which follows the villainous Tiny, one of the most recurring characters in the seemingly endless barrage of new nicknames. The reason behind my rating of "liked it" is partly because of this confusion, the narrative being hard to follow. As well as this, upon finishing the novel, 'liking' it didn't seem quite the right response. For the most part, I found myself compelled and curious to read further, interested at what shocks the novel would bring

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    One of my all time favourite movies, now I have finally finished reading the novel. I must admit, this book took me forever to read, as I kept putting it down. That being said once I decided to put my mind to it to read it by the end of my kid's summer I actually couldn't put it down. My mind has problems with so many characters and stories. But each character in this book was very important to the plot. This book is not for the squimish. In fact, neither is the movie, but if you've seen the mov One of my all time favourite movies, now I have finally finished reading the novel. I must admit, this book took me forever to read, as I kept putting it down. That being said once I decided to put my mind to it to read it by the end of my kid's summer I actually couldn't put it down. My mind has problems with so many characters and stories. But each character in this book was very important to the plot. This book is not for the squimish. In fact, neither is the movie, but if you've seen the movie and it's graphic detail, take that and multiple the violence by 40. The book helped me to gain an even better perspective of City of God (a favela/slum) in Rio. Also it gives one perspective on how impressionable youth are... And people in general. Being in America who isn't casing after that golden lifestyle? It brought about hard hitting realities of what is truly important when people were constantly being killed off, especially those trying to make a better life and leave the favela.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Frédéric

    Like many people, I've read this book after seeing the Fernando Meirelles movie, which I actually liked better. The movie is centered on a few characters and has a focal point as Buscapé. The book contains dozens of characters, follows many for various lengths of time and has no narrator. It digresses many times, that not always being relevant to a very thin yet confusing plot. Raw violence is omnipresent, described in a so detached and clinical way it nearly disturbed me, and I do like my crime Like many people, I've read this book after seeing the Fernando Meirelles movie, which I actually liked better. The movie is centered on a few characters and has a focal point as Buscapé. The book contains dozens of characters, follows many for various lengths of time and has no narrator. It digresses many times, that not always being relevant to a very thin yet confusing plot. Raw violence is omnipresent, described in a so detached and clinical way it nearly disturbed me, and I do like my crime stories dark and gritty! The book is based on scholar researches the author made and this probably explains his pared-down style. Yet, despite these downsides, it is an interesting book on a topic/environment we don't read much about: drug-related gang wars in 1960/70 Brazil. It doubles with a touch of a social perspective of a kind, the disinterest of the (white) junta for the lives of the (mainly black/mixed-bred) people of the dangerous favelas, no less so because of over-corrupt if not psycopathic cops and redcaps.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ken Brimhall

    Cidade de Deus Cidade de Deus (City of God), actually, the devil’s city, a favela (slum), part of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Paulo Lins, author, born and raised in the City of God who spent eight years in research, writing this novel, a tour de force, definitely not for the squeamish. I didn’t see the award winning movie, but the novel is enough, more than enough! You want immersion? You get immersion, but there’s no one to follow who isn’t forced into a life of crime, violence and sexual perversion Cidade de Deus Cidade de Deus (City of God), actually, the devil’s city, a favela (slum), part of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Paulo Lins, author, born and raised in the City of God who spent eight years in research, writing this novel, a tour de force, definitely not for the squeamish. I didn’t see the award winning movie, but the novel is enough, more than enough! You want immersion? You get immersion, but there’s no one to follow who isn’t forced into a life of crime, violence and sexual perversion. It’s either that, or being a sucker, working for the rich in construction or in a factory at one level above slave’s wages. Schools are far away. Just when you think it can’t get any worse, in Part 2, we get a glimpse of prison life. I’ll sum that up with a quote: “A faggot’s diarrhea is his period.” Nice people stay away. Pretend none of the City of God is a reality. Just pray that at the next Olympic Games the government has walled it off.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dlrayscience

    Certainly a fascinating topic and setting, and well worth reading. However, as a novel, I found City of God a bit confusing at times, and lacking in descriptiveness as well as in depth. Few of the characters really grab the reader by the heart -- though the fact that they actually existed and lived the lives portrayed is at least intellectually fascinating. In general, I feel like the novel needed some grounding in a character with whom international readers could identify to help them better pe Certainly a fascinating topic and setting, and well worth reading. However, as a novel, I found City of God a bit confusing at times, and lacking in descriptiveness as well as in depth. Few of the characters really grab the reader by the heart -- though the fact that they actually existed and lived the lives portrayed is at least intellectually fascinating. In general, I feel like the novel needed some grounding in a character with whom international readers could identify to help them better perceive the squalor and corruption of Rio. Still, City of God handles a subject and a setting rarely seen in Western literature and, although perhaps not the most moving novel, it is doubtlessly enlightening and educational.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rich

    This book is marred by the fact that I saw the film adaptation which benefits from having a narrator/character (The novel was translated to English after the film became popular.) Both the novel is better identified as a true crime story with an omniscient narrator who jumps around revealing the most brutal and intimate details of the lives of gangster's and regular people alike. It's a "thick" book which has moments of beautiful prose and moments where the violence is almost porn-like. Lins make This book is marred by the fact that I saw the film adaptation which benefits from having a narrator/character (The novel was translated to English after the film became popular.) Both the novel is better identified as a true crime story with an omniscient narrator who jumps around revealing the most brutal and intimate details of the lives of gangster's and regular people alike. It's a "thick" book which has moments of beautiful prose and moments where the violence is almost porn-like. Lins makes it's hard to feel for characters as he pulls back as soon as we start to follow one person's story. And as mentioned before Rocket as just a very minor character leaves us with no one to identify w8ith as the decades go by.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fee

    This has been one of my favorite movies for a while. If you have not seen it, it makes Scarface look like a PG movie. The book goes deeper into the protags and the antags. If you think what you see in the movie is bad or graphic, times it by five when you read the novel. Right now Hollywood is glorifying some Clooney movie how his wife is cheating on him and his daughter confronts him about it. Then he goes on a venture to see if its true and probably becomes friends with the guy or some bullshi This has been one of my favorite movies for a while. If you have not seen it, it makes Scarface look like a PG movie. The book goes deeper into the protags and the antags. If you think what you see in the movie is bad or graphic, times it by five when you read the novel. Right now Hollywood is glorifying some Clooney movie how his wife is cheating on him and his daughter confronts him about it. Then he goes on a venture to see if its true and probably becomes friends with the guy or some bullshit. I read the same situation in this book, but instead of friending the guy who is banging his wife, he gets a machete and decapitates him. Still interested. Read the book if you want to live in a third world of unlimited coke, raping, murdering, and purchasing cool 'High Ten' digs.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kenza

    The stories were so powerful. However, at the beginning I didn't find any literary taste for them. After page 60, I started feeling the language beats as usually spoken by gangsters. I was so touched by the parts of rape and when Tiny out of self-conscience admitted that he committed all those acts because of his feeling of inferiority. Those intersections of race, patriarchy, ignorance, and politics were well handled by Lins. I felt throughout the book that there were so many things lost in the The stories were so powerful. However, at the beginning I didn't find any literary taste for them. After page 60, I started feeling the language beats as usually spoken by gangsters. I was so touched by the parts of rape and when Tiny out of self-conscience admitted that he committed all those acts because of his feeling of inferiority. Those intersections of race, patriarchy, ignorance, and politics were well handled by Lins. I felt throughout the book that there were so many things lost in the translation because many of the sentence did not make sense.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lela

    Difficult review. It's gritty, it's sickening, it's beyond ugly, it's violent and disgusting. It 's bold, it's courageous, it's enlightening, it's beautiful in its honesty. I hated it and I loved it. Give yourself time with this one. Lots of characters so can be confusing. May need a break now and then but do read it . Difficult review. It's gritty, it's sickening, it's beyond ugly, it's violent and disgusting. It 's bold, it's courageous, it's enlightening, it's beautiful in its honesty. I hated it and I loved it. Give yourself time with this one. Lots of characters so can be confusing. May need a break now and then but do read it .

  27. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    One of the more gruesome and violent books I have read. However, an excellent story and one which I would recommend to anyone who doesn't mind having their thoughts haunted by their reading materials. One of the more gruesome and violent books I have read. However, an excellent story and one which I would recommend to anyone who doesn't mind having their thoughts haunted by their reading materials.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Russell Stevens

    A raw look at growing up in the favelas of Rio. Uniquely written from different perspectives and converging story lines. The translator took liberties with translating slang and it oft times uses cruder language than necessary.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This is one of my favorite books of all time!!! I seen the movie and just had to get the book as soon as found out there was one!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    A real life Grand Theft Auto, if it were set in the slums of Rio de Janeiro. Terrifying and thrilling.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.