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The Empire of the Tetrarchs: Imperial Pronouncements and Government Ad 284-324

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The era of Diocletian and Constantine--when the Christian church passed from persecution to imperial favor--saw far-reaching administrative changes that established the structure of government in the Roman Empire for three hundred years. This was a complex period of cooperation and rivalry between co-emperors, the result of Diocletian's experiment in government by four The era of Diocletian and Constantine--when the Christian church passed from persecution to imperial favor--saw far-reaching administrative changes that established the structure of government in the Roman Empire for three hundred years. This was a complex period of cooperation and rivalry between co-emperors, the result of Diocletian's experiment in government by four rulers, the tetrarchs. Drawing together material from a wide variety of sources, Corcoran studies the vast range of documents issued by the emperors and their officials, and assesses how effectively the machinery of government matched imperial ambitions.


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The era of Diocletian and Constantine--when the Christian church passed from persecution to imperial favor--saw far-reaching administrative changes that established the structure of government in the Roman Empire for three hundred years. This was a complex period of cooperation and rivalry between co-emperors, the result of Diocletian's experiment in government by four The era of Diocletian and Constantine--when the Christian church passed from persecution to imperial favor--saw far-reaching administrative changes that established the structure of government in the Roman Empire for three hundred years. This was a complex period of cooperation and rivalry between co-emperors, the result of Diocletian's experiment in government by four rulers, the tetrarchs. Drawing together material from a wide variety of sources, Corcoran studies the vast range of documents issued by the emperors and their officials, and assesses how effectively the machinery of government matched imperial ambitions.

12 review for The Empire of the Tetrarchs: Imperial Pronouncements and Government Ad 284-324

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Three stars is only because it's more of a 'reference' work that I find useful, rather than to describe it in terms of 'I liked it'. It's one for the scholars, or the hyper-interested lay reader. Finished it awhile ago, actually, but kept forgetting to mark it. Oh, well. Here it is.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Casey Knott

  3. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Davidson

  4. 5 out of 5

    Greg Santana

  5. 4 out of 5

    Olyvia

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tia

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wikimedia Italia

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wikimedia Italia

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gayle McCreedy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kjǫlsigʀ

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Doran

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tia

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