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Hell Hath No Fury: True Stories of Women at War from Antiquity to Iraq

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An engaging collection that uncovers injustices in history and overturns misconceptions about the role of women in war When you think of war, you think of men, right? Not so fast. In Hell Hath No Fury, Rosalind Miles and Robin Cross prove that although many of their stories have been erased or forgotten, women have played an integral role in wars throughout history. In witty An engaging collection that uncovers injustices in history and overturns misconceptions about the role of women in war When you think of war, you think of men, right? Not so fast. In Hell Hath No Fury, Rosalind Miles and Robin Cross prove that although many of their stories have been erased or forgotten, women have played an integral role in wars throughout history. In witty and compelling biographical essays categorized and alphabetized for easy reference, Miles and Cross introduce us to war leaders (Cleopatra, Elizabeth I, Margaret Thatcher); combatants (Molly Pitcher, Lily Litvak, Tammy Duckworth); spies (Belle Boyd, Virginia Hall, Noor Inayat Khan); reporters and propagandists (Martha Gellhorn, Tokyo Rose, Anna Politkov- skaya); and more. These are women who have taken action and who challenge our perceived notions of womanhood. Some will be familiar to readers, but most will not, though their deeds during wartime were every bit as important as their male contemporaries’ more heralded contributions.


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An engaging collection that uncovers injustices in history and overturns misconceptions about the role of women in war When you think of war, you think of men, right? Not so fast. In Hell Hath No Fury, Rosalind Miles and Robin Cross prove that although many of their stories have been erased or forgotten, women have played an integral role in wars throughout history. In witty An engaging collection that uncovers injustices in history and overturns misconceptions about the role of women in war When you think of war, you think of men, right? Not so fast. In Hell Hath No Fury, Rosalind Miles and Robin Cross prove that although many of their stories have been erased or forgotten, women have played an integral role in wars throughout history. In witty and compelling biographical essays categorized and alphabetized for easy reference, Miles and Cross introduce us to war leaders (Cleopatra, Elizabeth I, Margaret Thatcher); combatants (Molly Pitcher, Lily Litvak, Tammy Duckworth); spies (Belle Boyd, Virginia Hall, Noor Inayat Khan); reporters and propagandists (Martha Gellhorn, Tokyo Rose, Anna Politkov- skaya); and more. These are women who have taken action and who challenge our perceived notions of womanhood. Some will be familiar to readers, but most will not, though their deeds during wartime were every bit as important as their male contemporaries’ more heralded contributions.

30 review for Hell Hath No Fury: True Stories of Women at War from Antiquity to Iraq

  1. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    August review for Book Riot's Read Harder 2017: Hell Hath No Fury by Rosalind Miles and Robin Cross, 2008. [book about war category] I found Hell Hath No Fury: True Stories of Women at War from Antiquity to Iraq buried in a used bookstore years ago, and it sounded just up my alley. Like many books, though, it was relegated to the ever-stagnant, ever-increasing TBR pile, until a challenge such as this provokes me to dig through what I've got. I was intrigued to read a book about war that focused on August review for Book Riot's Read Harder 2017: Hell Hath No Fury by Rosalind Miles and Robin Cross, 2008. [book about war category] I found Hell Hath No Fury: True Stories of Women at War from Antiquity to Iraq buried in a used bookstore years ago, and it sounded just up my alley. Like many books, though, it was relegated to the ever-stagnant, ever-increasing TBR pile, until a challenge such as this provokes me to dig through what I've got. I was intrigued to read a book about war that focused on women's contributions, both of body and mind, but from the get-go, Hell Hath was difficult to get through. For one, the organization irked me. It was not necessarily set up chronologically, although I did enjoy the different sections on different kinds of contributions to war throughout history. There was just so much information, and it was presented relatively drily, sometimes very repetitively. It felt more like a reference book, which is all well and good but not what I thought I had signed up for. As soon as I got into a particularly juicy or inspiring anecdote, it was time to wrap up and roll onto the next entry. I would've liked some longer time spent on the actual individuals. This is not to say that I did not like this book, only that I felt it could've been presented better. There were aspects I really liked, especially the fact that the authors they included all kinds of women, not just those historically considered "GOOD." For example, there were spotlights on Nazi officers and Lynndie England of the Abu Ghraib catastrophe. It was good to get a well-rounded cast of characters, but I feel like this book was just that, trying to be *too* well-rounded. I want more specificity, more richness and detail, and it just wasn't possible with the scope of this book. Ultimately I am glad that I have this information now, but it was a bit of a chore to get there.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Great book. I wish it had more of a look at women outside of Western nations, and less of a focus on WWII in the last few chapters. Overall a great bunch of snapshots on important women in history.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Short bios of women from ancient to modern times that participated in battles and wars in defense of their freedom/ideals, for their very existance, or power. Women who also were healers/doctors, reporters, spies. And a few who were as cruel and evil as any man could be. Women who are well known and many that I never heard of before. My favorites were ancient women in Greece or Briton (ie, Boudica, Queen of Briton who united her people to fight the Romans); Athelread, King Alfred the Great's dau Short bios of women from ancient to modern times that participated in battles and wars in defense of their freedom/ideals, for their very existance, or power. Women who also were healers/doctors, reporters, spies. And a few who were as cruel and evil as any man could be. Women who are well known and many that I never heard of before. My favorites were ancient women in Greece or Briton (ie, Boudica, Queen of Briton who united her people to fight the Romans); Athelread, King Alfred the Great's daughter, who as queen took up the reins to keep the 4 kingdoms together as England; women of WWI and II that served on the front lines, as pilots who ferried planes across the U.S. for the military, reporters who took the chance to let truth be known no matter what country they lived in. And one that always stood out for me were the Jewish women who fought alongside their men during the 1943 Warsaw Ghetto uprising. This is a good source if you're interested in roles women played and their effect throughout history.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I ended up just skimming through this book. I always like to read the introduction in books instead of just skipping over them. In this case, I should have skipped it because I got so darn bored withthe introduction that I started to fall asleep. I had a hard time picking the book up again and when I did, I basically just flipped through it. I'm sure it's very interesting and will be worth a second look - some day.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I. loved. this. I am so grateful to this book -- it couldn't have ever by any means coverered all the details of these womens' lives, but I love that they included additional reading for the women I am interested in learning more about. There is a heavy emphasis on WWII and women in that war, but I know there is also a lot of documentation for them. I would love to see more on women from Latin America, Africa, and Asia -- it is very Eurocentric, but it is a great start.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I got this as an ARC from a used bookstore a long time ago. I don’t know why it took me so long to read this. It was good. A little outdated in parts by now, since it was published almost a decade ago. WWII was the most prominently featured conflict. Usually the entries about individual women were more interesting than the entries about military organisations, national movements etc. The out-of-the-blue Hemingway insults were a highlight.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    Loved this book. I might be biased as I got to meet the author and we had a lengthy discussion about some of these women and his travels while researching the people/ places. Overall a great read for any one who loves heroines.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicki

    One of the best collection of Historical figures I have ever read, very intriguing, I loved it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    A collection of short biographies of women involved in war as leaders, as military personnel, as correspondents, as spies.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    Look for my upcoming review in Bitch Magazine.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Beth

    It had lots of interesting history bits that are not normally talked about. A lot of world war stories.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kenzie Mills

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shadowcthuhlu

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lena

  16. 5 out of 5

    NCC-1701-J

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kellie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lianne Burwell

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leah Cossette

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yolanda Rico

  21. 4 out of 5

    J. Brown

  22. 5 out of 5

    Johnna

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  24. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  25. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  26. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Gilligan Wehr

  28. 4 out of 5

    Space

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

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