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Winds of Change: The Furture of Democracy in Iran

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Forced to become a normal citizen, the exiled son of the late Shah of Iran attempts to provide understanding and direction for his country and its people.


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Forced to become a normal citizen, the exiled son of the late Shah of Iran attempts to provide understanding and direction for his country and its people.

43 review for Winds of Change: The Furture of Democracy in Iran

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    An interesting yet dated look into the future of both Iran and the nation's opposition movement by Reza Pahlavi, the last heir apparent to the throne of the Imperial State of Iran. Pahlavi argues for a non-violent campaign of protest and civil disobedience against the current regime, emulating successful protest movements of other nations. A large part of the book deals with the hypothetical systems of government that could arise in a post-regime Iran, and the pros and cons of each of them. Inte An interesting yet dated look into the future of both Iran and the nation's opposition movement by Reza Pahlavi, the last heir apparent to the throne of the Imperial State of Iran. Pahlavi argues for a non-violent campaign of protest and civil disobedience against the current regime, emulating successful protest movements of other nations. A large part of the book deals with the hypothetical systems of government that could arise in a post-regime Iran, and the pros and cons of each of them. Interestingly enough, Pahlavi does not want to re-establish an iron-fisted rule of Iran by the monarchy, rather he would want the royal family to play a role of ceremony, and be a non-partisan stabilizer to a democratically elected government, similar to the role of royal families in Europe today.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Frederick

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lucas Proto

    A laughable attempt from Reza Pahlavi, son of the infamous Reza Sha of Iran, to show himself as the unifier his country needs to achieve a true democracy. Pahlavi avoids any reference to Iran before the 1979 revolution, which ousted his father, condemns theocracy and calls for a peaceful revolution, all while spewing as many truisms and tautologies as a book just short of 150 pages can contain. Even if his work was just a well-intentioned manifesto without personal interests at stake -which it isn A laughable attempt from Reza Pahlavi, son of the infamous Reza Sha of Iran, to show himself as the unifier his country needs to achieve a true democracy. Pahlavi avoids any reference to Iran before the 1979 revolution, which ousted his father, condemns theocracy and calls for a peaceful revolution, all while spewing as many truisms and tautologies as a book just short of 150 pages can contain. Even if his work was just a well-intentioned manifesto without personal interests at stake -which it isn't-, it would be naïve at best and dangerously stupid at worst.

  4. 5 out of 5

    B. Tony Towfighi

  5. 5 out of 5

    Avideh

  6. 4 out of 5

    Justin Smith

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ben Malavan

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sam Nazari

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pedram Khalili

  10. 5 out of 5

    Farshad

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert Christian

  12. 4 out of 5

    Luiz Rens

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Avideh

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brett Champion

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alan Fuller

  18. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Riazi

  19. 5 out of 5

    Fereshteh Farahmand

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  21. 5 out of 5

    Iran

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  23. 4 out of 5

    F.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kash

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  26. 4 out of 5

    Boo Boo

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Datta

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Benarroch

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

  30. 5 out of 5

    Levi

  31. 4 out of 5

    Wikimedia Italia

  32. 4 out of 5

    PatchesEsq

  33. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

  34. 5 out of 5

    Arash Kamangir

  35. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  36. 4 out of 5

    Youssra Tsouli

  37. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed El Batran

  38. 4 out of 5

    ls1z28chris

  39. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Occhipinti

  40. 4 out of 5

    Seyed

  41. 4 out of 5

    Gerard Perry

  42. 5 out of 5

    Negin

  43. 4 out of 5

    Salim

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