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The Suppression of the African Slave-Trade to the United States of America, 1638-1870

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Comprehensive, well-documented 1896 classic draws upon a wealth of primary source materials to examine the South's plantation economy and its influence on the slave trade, the role of Northern merchants in financing the slave trade during the 19th century, and much else.


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Comprehensive, well-documented 1896 classic draws upon a wealth of primary source materials to examine the South's plantation economy and its influence on the slave trade, the role of Northern merchants in financing the slave trade during the 19th century, and much else.

58 review for The Suppression of the African Slave-Trade to the United States of America, 1638-1870

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mommalibrarian

    This was du Bois' PhD thesis at Harvard. It is meticulously researched and footnoted. It covered many things I did not know before and I consider myself informed. The citizens of the northern states were as deeply implicated in the continuation of the slave trade as those in the south who owned slaves. Those with moral qualms were in a minority in all locations. The Federal legislature was as ineffective then as it is now. definitely worth a read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steve Gordon

    THIS, ladies and gentlemen, IS American history. It is free online. Get it. "Here was a rich new land, the wealth of which was to be had in return for ordinary manual labor. Had the country been conceived of as existing primarily for the benefit of its actual inhabitants, it might have waited for natural increase or immigration to supply the needed hands; but both Europe and the earlier colonists themselves regarded this land as existing chiefly for the benefit of Europe, and as designed to be e THIS, ladies and gentlemen, IS American history. It is free online. Get it. "Here was a rich new land, the wealth of which was to be had in return for ordinary manual labor. Had the country been conceived of as existing primarily for the benefit of its actual inhabitants, it might have waited for natural increase or immigration to supply the needed hands; but both Europe and the earlier colonists themselves regarded this land as existing chiefly for the benefit of Europe, and as designed to be exploited, as rapidly and ruthlessly as possible, of the boundless wealth of its resources. This was the primary excuse for the rise of the African slave-trade to America."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shira

    The 1969 introduction by Norman Klein gives an interesting overview of the strengths, weaknesses, and unique contributions, particularly by raising awareness of then-to-fore undiscussed issues, in DuBois' original thesis. DuBois' own Apologia to his work, written in 1954 (some 60 years after initial publication of his thesis?), is a fascinating read, given his insights into his own early work as a young man, and thoughts on that work, viewed from the distance of those years. Very nice read. The w The 1969 introduction by Norman Klein gives an interesting overview of the strengths, weaknesses, and unique contributions, particularly by raising awareness of then-to-fore undiscussed issues, in DuBois' original thesis. DuBois' own Apologia to his work, written in 1954 (some 60 years after initial publication of his thesis?), is a fascinating read, given his insights into his own early work as a young man, and thoughts on that work, viewed from the distance of those years. Very nice read. The work itself, because the research is now both dated and superseded by other work, I did not read in detail, but skimmed for correlation if needed later, with the Slavery sub-project on Wikitree. Shira 27 Feb. 12017 HE (the Holocene Calendar)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Herman Gigglethorpe

    Use this more as a resource rather than reading it straight through. This book is Du Bois's thesis, and contains many details about American policy regarding slavery and the African slave trade. The laws varied greatly depending on the region and time, and some opposed the slave trade not for moral reasons, but rather to increase the price of slaves already within the American colonies. Because it's an academic monograph, the prose is dry.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Clayton Brannon

    Not the easiest book to read but well worth the effort and time. Lots of details that you will not find anywhere else.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Evan

    W.E.B. DuBois’s PhD dissertation reminds that progress does not move in a linear fashion, particularly in the American context or narrative. The book speaks about the importing and exporting of enslaved Africans by the 13 colonies, later known as the United States. This international trade was deemed to be separate from the institution of slavery WITHIN the United States. With thorough research, DuBois starts with the individual states’ motives (or lack thereof) for slowing or abolishing the tra W.E.B. DuBois’s PhD dissertation reminds that progress does not move in a linear fashion, particularly in the American context or narrative. The book speaks about the importing and exporting of enslaved Africans by the 13 colonies, later known as the United States. This international trade was deemed to be separate from the institution of slavery WITHIN the United States. With thorough research, DuBois starts with the individual states’ motives (or lack thereof) for slowing or abolishing the trade, such as lack of economic use for slaves or a replication of the Haitian Revolution on American soil, why the trade sped back up after the American Revolution, and how the gradual move towards abolition of the international trade was constantly hindered or undermined.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David

    A fascinating look at the slave trade from a perspective far closer than intellectual studies written later. Du Bois is undoubtedly a great writer. The subject is studied with a seemingly dispassionate relating of relevant facts. A good book with which to gain greater understanding (though hardly any sympathy) of the political climate of the age.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    This is not the 2009 edition. It is a 1970 reprint edition by Corner House Publishers of Massachusetts.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Peter Gardner

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nai

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stanley Hankins

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Roberts

    The best coverage of the slave trade I've read so far. Perhaps it is the approach, a Sociological view, rather than a history. I found it dispassionate, extremely well researched and specific in scope. All sides of the issue were covered, including the international interests of the time. I haven't found a modern book that has done as good a job. Read it!!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert Wood

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan Humeston

  16. 4 out of 5

    David

  17. 4 out of 5

    Peter B.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paden

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gary Mueller

  21. 4 out of 5

    Umm Juwayriyah

  22. 4 out of 5

    alcenous hassen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Kalene

  24. 4 out of 5

    lloyd sales

  25. 5 out of 5

    Larry

  26. 4 out of 5

    steven beresford

  27. 5 out of 5

    Darren Pardee

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Bianca

  29. 5 out of 5

    Linda Mallet

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bruinrefugee

  31. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  32. 4 out of 5

    Wizzard

  33. 4 out of 5

    Nikhil P. Freeman

  34. 4 out of 5

    Alan Swartz

  35. 4 out of 5

    Leta

  36. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin

  37. 5 out of 5

    Juanita

  38. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad A

  39. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

  40. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  41. 5 out of 5

    Michael Leak

  42. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

  43. 4 out of 5

    Tiff Miller

  44. 4 out of 5

    Michael Strode

  45. 4 out of 5

    Vannessa

  46. 4 out of 5

    Amy Gideon

  47. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  48. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Frakes

  49. 4 out of 5

    Tina

  50. 5 out of 5

    James Costen JR

  51. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  52. 4 out of 5

    Kenny

  53. 4 out of 5

    Julia B.

  54. 5 out of 5

    Clifford Browder

  55. 5 out of 5

    Richard Ouellette

  56. 5 out of 5

    Monet Duren

  57. 4 out of 5

    Dave Blair

  58. 4 out of 5

    Bill

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