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The End of Human Rights: Critical Legal Thought at the Turn of the Century

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Human rights have become an important ideal in current times, yet our age has witnessed more violations of human rights than any previous less enlightened one. This book explores the historical and theoretical dimensions of this paradox. Divided into two parts, the first section offers an alternative history of natural law, in which natural rights are represented as the et Human rights have become an important ideal in current times, yet our age has witnessed more violations of human rights than any previous less enlightened one. This book explores the historical and theoretical dimensions of this paradox. Divided into two parts, the first section offers an alternative history of natural law, in which natural rights are represented as the eternal human struggle to resist opression and to fight for a society in which people are no longer degraded or despised. At the time of their birth in the 18th Century and again in the popular uprisings of the last decade, human rights became the dominant critique of law and society. The radical rhetoric of rights and its apparently endless expansive potential has led to its adoption by governments and individuals alike seeking to justify their actions on moral grounds and has undermined its radical edge. Part Two examines the philosophical logic of rights. The classical critiques of Kant, Burke, Hegel and Marx illuminate traditional aproaches to the concept of human rights. The work of Heidegger, Sartre and psychoanalysis is used to deconstruct the metaphisical essentialism of bothe universalists and cultural relativists. Finally, through a consideration of the ethics of otherness, and with reference to recent human rights violations, it is argued that the end of human rights is to judge law and politics from a moral stand point which both transcends the present and is historically relevant.


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Human rights have become an important ideal in current times, yet our age has witnessed more violations of human rights than any previous less enlightened one. This book explores the historical and theoretical dimensions of this paradox. Divided into two parts, the first section offers an alternative history of natural law, in which natural rights are represented as the et Human rights have become an important ideal in current times, yet our age has witnessed more violations of human rights than any previous less enlightened one. This book explores the historical and theoretical dimensions of this paradox. Divided into two parts, the first section offers an alternative history of natural law, in which natural rights are represented as the eternal human struggle to resist opression and to fight for a society in which people are no longer degraded or despised. At the time of their birth in the 18th Century and again in the popular uprisings of the last decade, human rights became the dominant critique of law and society. The radical rhetoric of rights and its apparently endless expansive potential has led to its adoption by governments and individuals alike seeking to justify their actions on moral grounds and has undermined its radical edge. Part Two examines the philosophical logic of rights. The classical critiques of Kant, Burke, Hegel and Marx illuminate traditional aproaches to the concept of human rights. The work of Heidegger, Sartre and psychoanalysis is used to deconstruct the metaphisical essentialism of bothe universalists and cultural relativists. Finally, through a consideration of the ethics of otherness, and with reference to recent human rights violations, it is argued that the end of human rights is to judge law and politics from a moral stand point which both transcends the present and is historically relevant.

30 review for The End of Human Rights: Critical Legal Thought at the Turn of the Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Puri Kencana Putri

    This book is one of so many international human rights law text books that I found at the university library. But the content is more likely philosophical, and the question is beyond from, "what are human rights?" like we used to ask to the professors or people who are really into human rights field. One thing for sure that I will always remember whenever I read Douzinas's work is, his bold statement to defend international law as the ultimate source of human relations. And he said within his bo This book is one of so many international human rights law text books that I found at the university library. But the content is more likely philosophical, and the question is beyond from, "what are human rights?" like we used to ask to the professors or people who are really into human rights field. One thing for sure that I will always remember whenever I read Douzinas's work is, his bold statement to defend international law as the ultimate source of human relations. And he said within his book, "If God does not exist, international law will prevail". Very provocative one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

  3. 5 out of 5

    Artemis

  4. 4 out of 5

    Armando Bravo salcido

  5. 4 out of 5

    Haya

  6. 4 out of 5

    Armando

  7. 4 out of 5

    adam

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shaimaa Abdelkarim

  9. 4 out of 5

    momen bari

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aleksandra Mirazchieva

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mauricio Santoro

  12. 5 out of 5

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  13. 4 out of 5

    Angeliki Samara

  14. 4 out of 5

    Javier

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sena Galazzi lian

  16. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Whyte

  17. 5 out of 5

    Finlay Young

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emma Grigg

  19. 4 out of 5

    Manucincunegui

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elena

  21. 4 out of 5

    FS

  22. 4 out of 5

    Layla Greening

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kai Heron

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dimon Liu

  25. 4 out of 5

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  26. 4 out of 5

    Carolina Grant

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rodrigo Cittadino

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  29. 4 out of 5

    Riley Ellard

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dario

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