counter create hit The Night is Dark and I Am Far from Home: Political Indictment of US Public Schools - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Night is Dark and I Am Far from Home: Political Indictment of US Public Schools

Availability: Ready to download

Kozol, author of Rachel and Her Children: Homeless Families in America, offers an absorbing analysis of the ethical crisis confronting our culture. In this fourth edition, a new introduction and epilogue place the book in the context of contemporary issues and attitudes.


Compare

Kozol, author of Rachel and Her Children: Homeless Families in America, offers an absorbing analysis of the ethical crisis confronting our culture. In this fourth edition, a new introduction and epilogue place the book in the context of contemporary issues and attitudes.

30 review for The Night is Dark and I Am Far from Home: Political Indictment of US Public Schools

  1. 4 out of 5

    David

    I thought this was seemed to be a great call to arms when I first read it for Buzz Alexander's Prison and Literature class. Now it seems like standard leftist rage, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. I thought this was seemed to be a great call to arms when I first read it for Buzz Alexander's Prison and Literature class. Now it seems like standard leftist rage, but that's not necessarily a bad thing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Shachter

    This book changed my life at age 19. I never looked at my world through quite the same eyes.

  3. 5 out of 5

    david

    an absolute must read. this was a cover to cover that was rousing to the end. i was seriously pissed off for days after reading this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael David

    The book is a radical take on the school system, and the solution it offers is nothing short of the system's deconstruction. I take offense with Kozol thinking of people never being independent of one another: I believe in the concept of free will, and in the ability of man to choose. Blaming the children of a poor family of ten isn't right, I agree, but I don't think the parents of those eight children should be exonerated for the children that they willfully produced: a man just doesn't slip a The book is a radical take on the school system, and the solution it offers is nothing short of the system's deconstruction. I take offense with Kozol thinking of people never being independent of one another: I believe in the concept of free will, and in the ability of man to choose. Blaming the children of a poor family of ten isn't right, I agree, but I don't think the parents of those eight children should be exonerated for the children that they willfully produced: a man just doesn't slip and land on his wife's vagina, and he certainly doesn't do it 'accidentally' eight times. That's just stupid. There are poor people who rise above their circumstances because they know enough not to repeat their parents' mistakes, or are sane enough to observe other people. There are some poor people who succeed, and their success is not just because of luck, or of eschewing school. They succeed because they choose to delay their gratifications, knowing the effect of having too many children from their parents, and then working hard to improve their lot in life. I came from such a family. I don't eat potato chips or drown myself in television because I've had sane parents (who were both poor) who realized the value of family planning. It's easy to be an armchair idealist. I just think that the total deconstruction of the school system isn't the solution. To blame the system of education for parental shortcomings isn't a good enough excuse. I think Kozol is wrong in this regard. It's also up to the child and up to the parents as much as the state and the school system being responsible for the child's growth. Change always starts with oneself. I know I won't be the next Gandhi, but I'll fucking try my best to be a great writer, and that's because I will myself to become one. I won't use any school system as an excuse.

  5. 5 out of 5

    cee

    a lot of what kozol has to say holds true whether in what is literally done in schools or what the spirit of changes since 1975 have been. kept remembering my high school homeroom teacher who made me sit in the hall because i wouldn't stand for the pledge. anyway it's a very illuminating book and i admire kozol's commitment to principle a lot of what kozol has to say holds true whether in what is literally done in schools or what the spirit of changes since 1975 have been. kept remembering my high school homeroom teacher who made me sit in the hall because i wouldn't stand for the pledge. anyway it's a very illuminating book and i admire kozol's commitment to principle

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    This was a radical, dense book for being so short. I loved all the ideas in it, the research, the calls to action. It took me a while to read because it’s dealing with hard hitting subjects. In that aspect it was very emotional, so I had to take breaks while reading.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    Boy, he is radical. He says revolt even if you don't have a better solution. He cuts you no slack if you want to work with the oppressed, and then go home and drink your brandy and smoke your cigars. He will not let you say - "I like his message but it is so thugish and he doesn't really tell me what to do just what NOT to do - he says that you can't sooth yourself into thinking that your life is separate from the underpaid, underserved, underclass. He is disturbing and wrong and right and his 1 Boy, he is radical. He says revolt even if you don't have a better solution. He cuts you no slack if you want to work with the oppressed, and then go home and drink your brandy and smoke your cigars. He will not let you say - "I like his message but it is so thugish and he doesn't really tell me what to do just what NOT to do - he says that you can't sooth yourself into thinking that your life is separate from the underpaid, underserved, underclass. He is disturbing and wrong and right and his 1975 words stir up the dust of Ferguson and get in your eyes and march along with Gandhi and King and Jesus F. Christ. Get out of my head so I can make my reservations for dinner and write my check to the homeless shelter and put up my tree. I am indeed far from home.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jerrold Thompson

    Best book on American education ever written. I taught for 32 years and no other education textbook guided my principles of instruction better in my lit-comp-humanities-rhetoric classes. It was required reading in my Advanced Comp classes. Should be required reading for juniors and graduate refresher courses in Schools of Education. Most honest and clear book on the main flaws and concrete solution you can practice in 1st hour on Monday.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bobby

    I don't remember this book that well, but it was very influential in developing how I viewed the world and my place in it. On that merit, I'll give it four stars. Basically, it talks about the education of the priveleged and how priveleged children are socialized to rationalize and legitimize the role of exploiter they will soon inherit in society. I don't remember this book that well, but it was very influential in developing how I viewed the world and my place in it. On that merit, I'll give it four stars. Basically, it talks about the education of the priveleged and how priveleged children are socialized to rationalize and legitimize the role of exploiter they will soon inherit in society.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Absolutely chilling.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jane Mosley

    This is an amazing book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rhod

    I think I am being generous with three stars - thought the book rambled quite a bit and was not nearly as clear an indictment of schools as I expected.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    education

  14. 5 out of 5

    AJK

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom Jordan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Hosey

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Shih

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Allison

  22. 5 out of 5

    Donna Davis

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ted Morgan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Watkins

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karen Chance

  27. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

  28. 4 out of 5

    Disco

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Krislov

  30. 5 out of 5

    MrsQ

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.