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Yours, Jack: Spiritual Direction from C.S. Lewis

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C. S. Lewis spent a good portion of each day corresponding with people via handwritten letters. Over his lifetime he wrote thousands of letters in which he offered his friends and acquaintances advice on the Christian life, giving away a bit of himself to each of these correspondents as he signed his notes with a heartfelt and familiar, "yours, Jack." Most of these letters C. S. Lewis spent a good portion of each day corresponding with people via handwritten letters. Over his lifetime he wrote thousands of letters in which he offered his friends and acquaintances advice on the Christian life, giving away a bit of himself to each of these correspondents as he signed his notes with a heartfelt and familiar, "yours, Jack." Most of these letters are currently only available in their entirety—a collection consisting of three hefty tomes. Yours, Jack features the best inspirational readings and sage counsel culled from C. S. Lewis's letters, offering an accessible look at this great author's personal vision for the spiritual life. This thematic selection from his letters offers the freshest presentation of Lewis's writings since his death in 1963. Yours, Jack will showcase Lewis's remarkable teachings and vision for a new generation.


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C. S. Lewis spent a good portion of each day corresponding with people via handwritten letters. Over his lifetime he wrote thousands of letters in which he offered his friends and acquaintances advice on the Christian life, giving away a bit of himself to each of these correspondents as he signed his notes with a heartfelt and familiar, "yours, Jack." Most of these letters C. S. Lewis spent a good portion of each day corresponding with people via handwritten letters. Over his lifetime he wrote thousands of letters in which he offered his friends and acquaintances advice on the Christian life, giving away a bit of himself to each of these correspondents as he signed his notes with a heartfelt and familiar, "yours, Jack." Most of these letters are currently only available in their entirety—a collection consisting of three hefty tomes. Yours, Jack features the best inspirational readings and sage counsel culled from C. S. Lewis's letters, offering an accessible look at this great author's personal vision for the spiritual life. This thematic selection from his letters offers the freshest presentation of Lewis's writings since his death in 1963. Yours, Jack will showcase Lewis's remarkable teachings and vision for a new generation.

30 review for Yours, Jack: Spiritual Direction from C.S. Lewis

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dean

    Wonderful book, I loved it!!!! I've just finished it, and can hardly express the impact it has on me. First of all, if you like C. S. Lewis books, and are somewhat interested in the author, then this is it!!! We are talking about the paperback edition, with an atmospheric and evocative photo from "The Kilns" keep in sepia tone.... "The Kilns" means C. S. Lewis house. And, well, the entire book consists of a collection of letters which Lewis wrote during his life. I must here say that Paul F. Ford ha Wonderful book, I loved it!!!! I've just finished it, and can hardly express the impact it has on me. First of all, if you like C. S. Lewis books, and are somewhat interested in the author, then this is it!!! We are talking about the paperback edition, with an atmospheric and evocative photo from "The Kilns" keep in sepia tone.... "The Kilns" means C. S. Lewis house. And, well, the entire book consists of a collection of letters which Lewis wrote during his life. I must here say that Paul F. Ford has done a great job in this compilation of Lewis letters. You may asks yourself in what lies the appeal or the charm of it. So, I can of course speak only for me, for me this letters have been quasi a revelation and an open door of Lewis soul and thoughts. Indeed spiritual direction from a great man of God.... The letters contains and deal with a variety of topics, but not in a dry academic manner, I often have laughed aloud during my reading of the letters. This selection of letters from more than fifty years of correspondence, is far away from being something dry or lifeless.... One of my favourites books ever and ever!!!! So, if you love Lewis books, and wants to have a glimpse at the soul of one of the most beloved an graceful minds from the 20th centaury, then I urged you to get your copy. You will not regret it. Folks, neighbours and friends, for such kind of book which we here have, I will and must give 5 stars!!!! The year begins with 5 stars books for me!!! I wish all my friends and wonderful, beautiful people at good reads, a happy and blessed new year... I'd like that the same 5 stars experience happens and continues with you all!!! Dean:)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jes

    When it comes down to it, Lewis was a professor and he talks like a professor in his private life. I should have seen THAT coming. Therefore, this book took me awhile to pick through, even though reading letters is a lot like reading diary entries and nothing like the mundane task of a history book that has 50 page chapters. At least I felt I could put it down at moments and not be lost in a plot device or thought. I'm so glad I read this book. I think my generation of Christians (even my parent When it comes down to it, Lewis was a professor and he talks like a professor in his private life. I should have seen THAT coming. Therefore, this book took me awhile to pick through, even though reading letters is a lot like reading diary entries and nothing like the mundane task of a history book that has 50 page chapters. At least I felt I could put it down at moments and not be lost in a plot device or thought. I'm so glad I read this book. I think my generation of Christians (even my parents' generation) has idolized C.S. Lewis as one of the great minds in Christian thought. I'm not disputing this. I think he's BRILLIANT. But he's just one man. And I was glad to discover his humanity, his vices, his love for cats :) and to hear him discuss his own problems as well as give advice. I would recommend this book to anyone who has read a lot of Lewis. Before reading this, you must try to read Mere Christianity, The Great Divorce, The Problem of Pain and/or the entire Chronicles of Narnia collection. He references MANY authors, biblical passages and his own works. I think I want to read a little George McDonald now, based on how many times he recommended it as reading to those Lewis was writing. A great read. Take your time with it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    RE de Leon

    CS Lewis wrote a lot of letters. And his literary estate has come up with a lot of compilations. This particular compilation, edited by Paul F. Ford, compiles a good number of Lewis letters under the theme of spiritual direction. That is, the letters here are ones in which Lewis either gave advice (Ford labels these 'spiritual direction' letters), sought advice (Ford labelled these 'spiritual discipleship'), or wrote to his peers ('equals', Ford labels them, and calls these letters 'spiritual co CS Lewis wrote a lot of letters. And his literary estate has come up with a lot of compilations. This particular compilation, edited by Paul F. Ford, compiles a good number of Lewis letters under the theme of spiritual direction. That is, the letters here are ones in which Lewis either gave advice (Ford labels these 'spiritual direction' letters), sought advice (Ford labelled these 'spiritual discipleship'), or wrote to his peers ('equals', Ford labels them, and calls these letters 'spiritual companionship' letters) about spiritual matters. Perhaps not a wise purchase if you already have the three volumes of collected letters of CS Lewis. Or perhaps wise because it gives you access to a specific set of letters from Lewis' vast body of epistolaria. The book is not cheap, or at least, my hardcover edition is not. So the buyer will have to choose. RE de Leon Agoo La Union 10.25 PM 4 January 2010

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeannine

    Perfect reading for weather that keeps one indoors. Mr. Lewis was a prolific and generous letter writer (writing to people who wrote to him after reading one or more of his many books, and doing so despite painful arthritis in his wrist). Because he was a man who actively disbelieved for some part of his life, I tend to trust his take on matters of faith. He always writes with such intellect but also wit, and, especially to the children who wrote to him about Narnia, tenderness and a sparkling w Perfect reading for weather that keeps one indoors. Mr. Lewis was a prolific and generous letter writer (writing to people who wrote to him after reading one or more of his many books, and doing so despite painful arthritis in his wrist). Because he was a man who actively disbelieved for some part of his life, I tend to trust his take on matters of faith. He always writes with such intellect but also wit, and, especially to the children who wrote to him about Narnia, tenderness and a sparkling way of speaking to children without speaking down to them. Some of the subject matter is not of interest to me, or way over my head, but reading this volume makes me want to tackle all 3 volumes of his letters.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Othy

    Great -- BUT! I got all the way to the end and in a letter from 1961 Lewis wrote to someone about his disliking towards publishing letters: "I do not wish to relinquish things often worth of sacred silence to subsequent reading by posterity. For nowadays inquisitive researchers dig out all our affairs and besmirch them with the poison of 'publicity' (as a barbarous thing I am giving it a barbarous name). This letter made me stop reading the book immediately, and I've only opened it again to find Great -- BUT! I got all the way to the end and in a letter from 1961 Lewis wrote to someone about his disliking towards publishing letters: "I do not wish to relinquish things often worth of sacred silence to subsequent reading by posterity. For nowadays inquisitive researchers dig out all our affairs and besmirch them with the poison of 'publicity' (as a barbarous thing I am giving it a barbarous name). This letter made me stop reading the book immediately, and I've only opened it again to find this quote. Sad that such a view is held by someone who's published letters take up three full volumes...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    These letters were sweet. I appreciated his emphasis, in almost every letter, on prayer and how kind a man he was to answer silly or unimportant letters. Also, he often returned letters that were sent to him, which I thought was a thoughtful gesture, especially when the letters were of a personal nature.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    That was a fantastic book. It's so odd. C.S. Lewis died over fifty years ago and yet here I am crying as I finish this book, grieving as if I had actually known him and shan't be able to talk with him anymore. Man, books are so powerful. To be able to read the words of someone who died twenty years before you were born and build a relationship of mentorship with them is so amazing. I am sad that this book is over, but I am so glad that I can just read it again. Or, pick up one of his other books That was a fantastic book. It's so odd. C.S. Lewis died over fifty years ago and yet here I am crying as I finish this book, grieving as if I had actually known him and shan't be able to talk with him anymore. Man, books are so powerful. To be able to read the words of someone who died twenty years before you were born and build a relationship of mentorship with them is so amazing. I am sad that this book is over, but I am so glad that I can just read it again. Or, pick up one of his other books and read it. I'm not entirely sure why I am crying. It's not that this is a pathetic end. It just a bunch of letters written from one man to dozens of other people across several years, it isn't a pathetic dying scene which is my usual tear jerker. No, I am sad because I never got the chance to talk to this man in reality, and it's a shame that he died after so short a life. He lived 70 years and wrote dozens of books and hundreds of letters and it still isn't enough! Just the sheer honesty that he had with the people he wrote to was touching. My favorite letters were the letters he wrote to children who wrote fan letters about Narnia. You could tell that he was talking to a child and not an adult, but not because he talked down to them, rather it was like you could see his real personality shining out through them because he didn't have to pretend to have a veneer of education or maturity or adulthood. That's probably why Narnia remains popular to this day. Now I want to go reread Narnia to cheer myself up.

  8. 5 out of 5

    G.M. Burrow

    Just lovely. You can read most of C.S. Lewis's letters in their entirety (and I plan to), but this book is a helpful thematic collection of just his spiritual discussions and advice—including excerpts from the standalone book Letters to an American Lady. Little tidbit that struck me is how his style changes when writing to men as opposed to women. With the ladies, he is chattier, gentler, and more "oh!" expressive, but this tone actually creates a certain (appropriate) distance between him and h Just lovely. You can read most of C.S. Lewis's letters in their entirety (and I plan to), but this book is a helpful thematic collection of just his spiritual discussions and advice—including excerpts from the standalone book Letters to an American Lady. Little tidbit that struck me is how his style changes when writing to men as opposed to women. With the ladies, he is chattier, gentler, and more "oh!" expressive, but this tone actually creates a certain (appropriate) distance between him and his female audiences, a distance that wouldn't be obvious unless you compared it with his male-readership letters. To the guys, he is brisk and blunt. The chatty wall of separation comes down. He's still expressive, but his silver tongue punches. It's the difference between "Dear, dear, this is very distressing news" and "Keep on, do your duty, say your prayers."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ben Mordecai

    If you have read Surprised by Joy you are right in line with what to expect in the letters of CS Lewis, winsome literary delight that takes for granted his being a literary genius. The high points are Lewis's Great example of humility, prayerfulness, and constant diligence to be about the work of sanctification. Low points should be familiar with most people who know Lewis: some doctrinal issues (prayers for the dead and expectation of their support, affirmation of purgatory, and a few others). If you have read Surprised by Joy you are right in line with what to expect in the letters of CS Lewis, winsome literary delight that takes for granted his being a literary genius. The high points are Lewis's Great example of humility, prayerfulness, and constant diligence to be about the work of sanctification. Low points should be familiar with most people who know Lewis: some doctrinal issues (prayers for the dead and expectation of their support, affirmation of purgatory, and a few others). Still, the book is very useful if you have the patience to read through one so lengthy. I especially enjoyed the last six years of his life as he begins to experience the quick marriage and death of his wife and leading up to his own death, though this will take some patience as the book edges on 400 pages.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    Loved the spiritual advice about contentment, busyness vs. resting vs. doing one's duty, doubting one's salvation, looking forward to death, and also the few articles sprinkled here and there written to children about Narnia.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Driscoll

    I have such mixed feelings about this book. I enjoy Lewis’ writing style very much, and it’s interesting to see how he influenced the lives of many even outside of his popular books through writing letters. Interestingly, a huge part of those letters were to married women. None of the letters included here were to his eventual wife, I think, which is perfectly fine, but I was surprised. I kind of read this book because I have been so personally frustrated with what is left of my faith in God. But I have such mixed feelings about this book. I enjoy Lewis’ writing style very much, and it’s interesting to see how he influenced the lives of many even outside of his popular books through writing letters. Interestingly, a huge part of those letters were to married women. None of the letters included here were to his eventual wife, I think, which is perfectly fine, but I was surprised. I kind of read this book because I have been so personally frustrated with what is left of my faith in God. But the encouragement and advice in here often struck me as nothing more than guesses at God’s nature and specific, sometimes questionable interpretations of scripture. Sometimes I really appreciated Lewis’ insights. Often I was just more frustrated. Still, there were many beautiful passages. He has some sweet letters to child fans. I was surprised at just how much Lewis admired Charles Williams and constantly wrote about what a pure and wonderful fellow he is, and how much he liked and recommended Williams’ books. Having read one of those books, I know just how very strange they are! For me as a fan of Lewis, I enjoyed reading about the reception of his books too. And the whole book seems wrong given that Lewis wrote this in one of his letters: I wish I could send you copies of the letters which the Venerable Father Don John Calabria wrote. But I have neither the letters themselves nor copies of them. It is my practice to consign to the flames all letters after two days—not, believe me, because I esteem them of no value, rather because I do not wish to relinquish things often worthy of sacred silence to subsequent reading by posterity. For nowadays inquisitive researchers dig out all our affairs and besmirch them with the poison of ‘publicity’ (as a barbarous thing I am giving it a barbarous name). It would seem Lewis would hate for people to take his letters and use them like this. So after I read that letter, I started feeling vaguely guilty for reading this book at all.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Applehillcottage

    I'm not sure why I never read this book, because I've read many of Lewis's books, and his classic Mere Christianity started me on my own journey as a believer. I finally tracked it down as an inter-library loan from my small town library because I wanted to read the context of so many great quotes that originated from his letters. His letters -- to relatives, friends, fans, and strangers -- give one such an intimate view of his daily life and thoughts. It made me nostalgic, for here is this grea I'm not sure why I never read this book, because I've read many of Lewis's books, and his classic Mere Christianity started me on my own journey as a believer. I finally tracked it down as an inter-library loan from my small town library because I wanted to read the context of so many great quotes that originated from his letters. His letters -- to relatives, friends, fans, and strangers -- give one such an intimate view of his daily life and thoughts. It made me nostalgic, for here is this great body of work and the source for so many inspirational quotes, and it is from correspondence! In fifty years no one will be publishing emails, will they? No matter, read this and drink in what this master of the English language has to say about the faith. You won't be disappointed.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Sheaffer

    I always appreciate C.S. Lewis' style - simultaneously intellectual and practical, straightforward yet humble. In these letters, Lewis tackles countless topics with eloquence, grace, and thoughtfulness - everything from prayer and aging to marriage and the state of the church. Despite being written between the 1920 and 1960s, these letters shed much light on current events. For example: “It is one of the evils of rapid diffusion of news that the sorrows of all the world come to us every morning. I I always appreciate C.S. Lewis' style - simultaneously intellectual and practical, straightforward yet humble. In these letters, Lewis tackles countless topics with eloquence, grace, and thoughtfulness - everything from prayer and aging to marriage and the state of the church. Despite being written between the 1920 and 1960s, these letters shed much light on current events. For example: “It is one of the evils of rapid diffusion of news that the sorrows of all the world come to us every morning. I think each village was meant to feel pity for its own sick and poor whom it can help and I doubt it is the duty of any private person to fix his mind on ills which he cannot help. (This may even become an escape from the works of charity we really can do to those we know).” -C.S. Lewis, p 119

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Neuschwander

    "Think of yourself just as a seed patiently waiting in the earth: waiting to come up a flower in the Gardener's good time, up into the real world, the real waking. I suppose that our whole present life, looked back on from there, will only seem a drowsy half-waking. We are here in the land of dreams. But the cock-crow is coming. It is nearer now than when I began this letter." -Lewis to Mary Willis Shelburne, 28 June 1963

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Jurss

    On top of being a prolific writer, CS Lewis was a prolific letter writer with many "pen pals". His correspondents included other writers, people seeking him for advice, and people writing him about his books. Often amusing, the letters give interesting insights to his views and their inspirations on his books.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Cranney

    Probably an abnormal opinion, but I think this is really my favorite work of his. When responding to letter he gets into the nitty gritty of our fallen, quotidian existence more than any of his theological works (although those definitely have their place).

  17. 5 out of 5

    Liz Banks

    I loved reading C.S. Lewis"s letters. They show his conversion, his views on many theological points, his letters to children who wrote to him about Narnia, his marriage ,and his views on death as he is dying. If you like C.S. Lewis, I believe you will be captivated by his letters.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Criddle

    Seeing The Heart Reading the letters written by C.S.Lewis has given me a glimpse of the heart of the man. Like sitting down at a table and having a conversation with him. The Bible says "Out of the heart the mouth speaks."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Having read the Narnia series abundant times, the Space Trilogy and Screwtape Letters, I was eager to read this book containing letters of spiritual guidance. Mr. Lewis apparently kept up an amazing amount of correspondence. Following are several quotes from various letters: (TO BEDE GRIFFITHS, on the meaning of 'spiritual') "One thing we want to do is to kill the word 'spiritual' in the sense in which it is used by writers like [Matthew] Arnold and [Benedetto] Croce. Last term I had to make the f Having read the Narnia series abundant times, the Space Trilogy and Screwtape Letters, I was eager to read this book containing letters of spiritual guidance. Mr. Lewis apparently kept up an amazing amount of correspondence. Following are several quotes from various letters: (TO BEDE GRIFFITHS, on the meaning of 'spiritual') "One thing we want to do is to kill the word 'spiritual' in the sense in which it is used by writers like [Matthew] Arnold and [Benedetto] Croce. Last term I had to make the following remark to a room full of Christian undergraduates, 'A man who is eating or lying with his wife or preparing to go to sleep, in humility, thankfulness, and temperance, is, by Christian standards, in an infinitely higher state than one who is listening to Bach or reading Plato in a state of pride'--obvious to you, but I could see it was quite a new light to them." (p. 70) (TO GENIA GOELZ. on temptations to pride) "Of course, none of us have 'any right' at the altar. You might as well talk of a non-existent person 'having a right' to be created. It is not our right but God's free bounty. An English peer said, 'I like the order of the Garter because it has no dam' nonsense about merit.' Nor has Grace. And we must keep on remembering that as a cure for Pride. Yes, pride is a perpetual, nagging temptation. Keep on knocking it on the head but don't be too worried about it. As long as one knows one is proud one is safe from the worst form of pride." (p. 180) (TO MRS. R. E. HALVORSON, on feelings and on the general rules for discernment) "I think every natural thing which is not in itself sinful can become the servant of the spiritual life, but none is automatically so. When it is not, it becomes either just trivial (as music is to millions of people) or a dangerous idol. The emotional effect of music may be not only a distraction (to some people at some times) but a delusion: i.e., feeling certain emotions in church they mistake them for religious emotions when they may be wholly natural. That means that even genuinely religious emotion is only a servant. No soul is saved by having it or damned by lacking it. The love we are commanded to have for God and our neighbour is a state of the will, not of the affections (though if they ever also play their part so much the better). So that the test of music or religion or even visions if one has them is always the same--do they make one more obedient, more God-centred, and neighbour-centred and less self-centred? 'Though I speak with the tongues of Bach and Palestrina and have not charity et cetera!" (p. 287) This is the kind of writing that make me want to read more. Not only all of Lewis' works, but also the authors he recommended to people in his letters, such as G. K. Chesterton and George MacDonald.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Guy Haley

    CS Lewis writes to his family and friends, about God, mostly. As could be expected from a man who was one of the UK's most celebrated Christian converts, a lot of Lewis' letters were on the subject of faith. Whether it was the intention of the editor or if Lewis did write almost exclusively on the subject of God is unclear; these letters are, after all, selected from a lifetime of epistles. The man presented here is, first and foremost, concerned with God, his correspondents looking for support, CS Lewis writes to his family and friends, about God, mostly. As could be expected from a man who was one of the UK's most celebrated Christian converts, a lot of Lewis' letters were on the subject of faith. Whether it was the intention of the editor or if Lewis did write almost exclusively on the subject of God is unclear; these letters are, after all, selected from a lifetime of epistles. The man presented here is, first and foremost, concerned with God, his correspondents looking for support, discussing matters religious, or debating with Lewis his theology. Their letters are, of course, not included. The period covers over forty years, from fragments from his later teenage years to letters written very shortly before his death, though naturally the former are few and far between. Enough though, to give us a picture of a cocky teenager who develops from avowed atheist to old don, dispensing an endless stream of layman's pastoral care. There's also plenty of musing on the differences between men and women, illness, friendship and death, even cats. Lewis comes across as you'd expect – warm, generous and wise, though there is in the certitude with which he offers his advice in his later letters, something of an echo of the cast-iron confidence of the youth he once was. These are opinions one would have to draw oneself, there's nothing in here, not event the shortest precis of his life, other than the letters. And that's where it fails, it's not comprehensive enough to be a useful tool to the researcher, and not broad enough to enlighten a non-expert. The letters themselves are marvellous, but the book is only a reasonable reference that needs to be digested alongside a good biography.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Diana Maryon

    I'd greatly prefer it if I could assign five stars to the Lewis part of this book, which I have recently received as a gift, but something more like three to the presentation. The Lewis content, much of it long familiar from the old Letters of C.S. Lewis compiled by his brother W.H Lewis and from Letters to an American Lady, is the usual vintage stuff. The quality of transcription, the Greek element and the general copy-editing leaves very much to be desired. I noted particularly a wrong Gospel I'd greatly prefer it if I could assign five stars to the Lewis part of this book, which I have recently received as a gift, but something more like three to the presentation. The Lewis content, much of it long familiar from the old Letters of C.S. Lewis compiled by his brother W.H Lewis and from Letters to an American Lady, is the usual vintage stuff. The quality of transcription, the Greek element and the general copy-editing leaves very much to be desired. I noted particularly a wrong Gospel reference, a jarring pair of slips in the text of the last and justly famous paragraph of ch. 14 in Surprised by Joy [p. 9], and an invented title, Ransom to Venus, created by wrong italicization on p. 89; but there are quite a few places where I am quite certain that we are not reading Lewis's own words but something else. What I am in no position to determine is whether some or all of this originates with the big three-volume set from which this otherwise attractive book is excerpted, or is more like dust picked up along the way. It is sadly true that literacy of the kind required for doing a faultless job on such material is at a premium today.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rachel M

    Loved it! I love to see the path of CS.Lewis' thoughts being shaped and expressed through these letters. It is a chance to see a more "private" Lewis - to find out what his real struggles and real excitements were at the times he was writing. And through these letters I felt as though I got to know the people he corresponded with. I got a bunch of book recommendations from him (those I followed up with were definitely worth it) and reading many of his letters often encouraged me... certain ones Loved it! I love to see the path of CS.Lewis' thoughts being shaped and expressed through these letters. It is a chance to see a more "private" Lewis - to find out what his real struggles and real excitements were at the times he was writing. And through these letters I felt as though I got to know the people he corresponded with. I got a bunch of book recommendations from him (those I followed up with were definitely worth it) and reading many of his letters often encouraged me... certain ones were so akin to my own spiritual questions that I went back to them several times. Reading this book made me feel nostalgic for the days of real, handwritten letters, and the depth of thought that went into them.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Reading this book was like eavesdropping on a conversation between C.S. Lewis and his friends. If you've exhausted all of Lewis' published work & still want to read more about him, you'll enjoy this collection of selected letters. They reveal a man who is humble, down-to-earth, full of common sense, and surprisingly open about his personal life. (The only thing he consistently refused to share his opinion about was church denominations.) One thing I personally enjoyed was hearing all of his book Reading this book was like eavesdropping on a conversation between C.S. Lewis and his friends. If you've exhausted all of Lewis' published work & still want to read more about him, you'll enjoy this collection of selected letters. They reveal a man who is humble, down-to-earth, full of common sense, and surprisingly open about his personal life. (The only thing he consistently refused to share his opinion about was church denominations.) One thing I personally enjoyed was hearing all of his book recommendations. A random fact from the book: "It is my practice to consign to the flames all letters after two days." I'm very thankful that the recipients of his letters didn't do the same!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I haven't read any of the other collections of Lewis' letters, and I am sure I would enjoy them, but I felt this book was in a sense providential for me. Lewis's advice for the spiritual life has an earthy and rational feel that might not appeal to postmoderns. But I found it helpful and realistic, and as I said before, for me it was providential. It was comforting, and didn't, despite the modern format for debate that Lewis tends to employ in making his Christian apologetics, dismiss the necess I haven't read any of the other collections of Lewis' letters, and I am sure I would enjoy them, but I felt this book was in a sense providential for me. Lewis's advice for the spiritual life has an earthy and rational feel that might not appeal to postmoderns. But I found it helpful and realistic, and as I said before, for me it was providential. It was comforting, and didn't, despite the modern format for debate that Lewis tends to employ in making his Christian apologetics, dismiss the necessity of investigation, doubt, or discussion.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Catie

    This book is a compilation of letters Lewis wrote to various friends and family. I found them SO interesting and insightful. I got this book from my library, and even though I had it for a month (or two), I just couldn't finish it. Not because I didn't LOVE it though! I absolutely did! It's just one of those books that you have to chew on--read a little at a time, chew on it, read a little more, chew on it, etc. I would love to buy it so I can do just that. :) If you are a Lewis fan, (or even if This book is a compilation of letters Lewis wrote to various friends and family. I found them SO interesting and insightful. I got this book from my library, and even though I had it for a month (or two), I just couldn't finish it. Not because I didn't LOVE it though! I absolutely did! It's just one of those books that you have to chew on--read a little at a time, chew on it, read a little more, chew on it, etc. I would love to buy it so I can do just that. :) If you are a Lewis fan, (or even if you're not) I highly recommend this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tina M

    If I only had a tiny sliver of Lewis's wisdom... My favorite book of all-time is The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. (I read the book out loud to Tia and Tessa when they were young and to Truly before she was a month old because she missed it when I read it to the others) This is what Lewis says of his book to a child just a few weeks before his death, "...I'm so thankful that you realized the 'hidden story' in the Narnian books. It is odd, children nearly always do, grown ups hardly ever."

  27. 4 out of 5

    Norm

    This book is simply extracts from letters that C S Lewis wrote to his friends containing personal counsel on spiritual questions. Facsinating that he didn't like his name so called himself "Jack" becasue he liked it better. I find him oft quoted more than read and revel in his many insights. I liked this book as much as Mere Christianity and Screwtape Letters, my two Lewis favorites.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karen L.

    If you are an avid Lewis fan, as I am, you'll enjoy this book of his correspondance with friends over many years. It contains letters to some of the "inklings" , other friends and his brother Warnie. You really feel like you get to know Lewis through reading these intimate letters. I felt encouraged reading his good advice to friends. I loved this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Godwin

    ended up not checking it out after reserving it at library...too disjointed. I loved reading his letters when it was in the context of the book, "A Severe Mercy." I often enjoy reading letters, and he comes across as a very likeable and witty person, as well as deeply spiritual and interesting. But the letters seemed a little hard to jump right into.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    As always challenging, inspiring, comforting. Lewis writes like I think!

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