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Sacramento's Midtown

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As Sacramento s neighborhoods grew eastward from Fifteenth Street to Thirty-first Street (later Alhambra Boulevard), the area evolved into a complex mix of housing and businesses known as Midtown. Sutter s Fort was still popular, and community groups like the Native Sons of the Golden West restored its last remnants for future generations. In 1927, the city built Memorial As Sacramento s neighborhoods grew eastward from Fifteenth Street to Thirty-first Street (later Alhambra Boulevard), the area evolved into a complex mix of housing and businesses known as Midtown. Sutter s Fort was still popular, and community groups like the Native Sons of the Golden West restored its last remnants for future generations. In 1927, the city built Memorial Auditorium, a tribute to fallen soldiers, as a large central venue that continues to serve as an important setting for graduations, concerts, and conventions. The J and K Street business corridors expanded from downtown, and identifiable neighborhoods such as Poverty Ridge, Boulevard Park, and New Era Park developed as people settled and established businesses in these growing areas. Today s Midtown supports numerous Victorian mansions and Craftsman bungalows, as well as the legacies of such employers as the California Almond Growers Exchange, California Packing Corporation, Buffalo Brewery, Sutter Hospital, and the Sacramento Bee newspaper."


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As Sacramento s neighborhoods grew eastward from Fifteenth Street to Thirty-first Street (later Alhambra Boulevard), the area evolved into a complex mix of housing and businesses known as Midtown. Sutter s Fort was still popular, and community groups like the Native Sons of the Golden West restored its last remnants for future generations. In 1927, the city built Memorial As Sacramento s neighborhoods grew eastward from Fifteenth Street to Thirty-first Street (later Alhambra Boulevard), the area evolved into a complex mix of housing and businesses known as Midtown. Sutter s Fort was still popular, and community groups like the Native Sons of the Golden West restored its last remnants for future generations. In 1927, the city built Memorial Auditorium, a tribute to fallen soldiers, as a large central venue that continues to serve as an important setting for graduations, concerts, and conventions. The J and K Street business corridors expanded from downtown, and identifiable neighborhoods such as Poverty Ridge, Boulevard Park, and New Era Park developed as people settled and established businesses in these growing areas. Today s Midtown supports numerous Victorian mansions and Craftsman bungalows, as well as the legacies of such employers as the California Almond Growers Exchange, California Packing Corporation, Buffalo Brewery, Sutter Hospital, and the Sacramento Bee newspaper."

27 review for Sacramento's Midtown

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    As I continue my tour of relevant local history reads, I am coming across very different styles and approaches to telling the Sacramento story. I have always appreciated the Arcadia series of books for their publication of local history including the many images they incorporate into their books. In fact, the stories are largely told through images, and it is fun placing the old photos with current locations. As such, I enjoyed reading through this book that describes tone relatively small area As I continue my tour of relevant local history reads, I am coming across very different styles and approaches to telling the Sacramento story. I have always appreciated the Arcadia series of books for their publication of local history including the many images they incorporate into their books. In fact, the stories are largely told through images, and it is fun placing the old photos with current locations. As such, I enjoyed reading through this book that describes tone relatively small area of Midtown Sacramento, which is no more than a few miles square, if that. Each of the neighborhoods within are broken down into chapters and the streets and corners are described independently. Many times I came across very familiar spots and was thrilled to see their origins (who knew my favorite Mexican spot was once a small grocery in the 1930s and part of the promotion to enlarge the area?). I also learned that, of all the small Midtown neighborhoods, I live in Poverty Ridge. That has to be my favorite part in reading this book. Thank god for irony. I plan to continue reading through these books as my location changes, as the publishers do a nice job in researching and collecting relevant information and images related to the local areas described. I dare anyone to pick up a book in this series dedicated to their hometown area and not find it amusing, at the very least.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  3. 4 out of 5

    dvnt_23

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rae-Nani

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sunnie

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bevyn

  8. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  10. 5 out of 5

    Krissy

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  12. 5 out of 5

    Camille H

  13. 5 out of 5

    aaron sloan

  14. 5 out of 5

    Megan's Picks For Today Blog

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Macdonald

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ryan T Nagle

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  18. 5 out of 5

    George Huner

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shelley Eagletap

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Manning

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dan Allison

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael J Hill

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alison Miller

  24. 5 out of 5

    Betty Davis

  25. 4 out of 5

    troy brittain

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gary Wilcox

  27. 5 out of 5

    Richard J.

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