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Selling 2,000,000 copies in early editions, this is 2nd of the rediscovered Sherlock Holmes adventures "acquired" from a widow whose husband was descended from the distaff side of Holmes's family, this mystery finds Holmes solving a double murder in London's theater district. "Don't miss it."--Cosmopolitan. The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD is Selling 2,000,000 copies in early editions, this is 2nd of the rediscovered Sherlock Holmes adventures "acquired" from a widow whose husband was descended from the distaff side of Holmes's family, this mystery finds Holmes solving a double murder in London's theater district. "Don't miss it."--Cosmopolitan. The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD is a Sherlock Holmes pastiche novel by Nicholas Meyer, published in '76. It takes place after his other two Holmes pastiches, The Seven-Percent Solution & The Canary Trainer, tho it was published twixt the two. The plot concerns a series of strange murders in London's Theater District at the end of the 19th Century. Contrary to what the press has sometimes asserted, The West End Horror has nothing to do with (tho it arguably bears subtle references to) Jack the Ripper or his crimes. Altho this novel doesn't feature a dramatic action climax like Meyer's other two pastiches, the mystery's dénouement may well affect many more people than those of his other adventures. It also includes a 1st meeting between the great detective & Dr Moore Agar, whose "dramatic introduction to Holmes" was one Watson, in the original Arthur Conan Doyle story "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot", wrote that he "may some day recount."


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Selling 2,000,000 copies in early editions, this is 2nd of the rediscovered Sherlock Holmes adventures "acquired" from a widow whose husband was descended from the distaff side of Holmes's family, this mystery finds Holmes solving a double murder in London's theater district. "Don't miss it."--Cosmopolitan. The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD is Selling 2,000,000 copies in early editions, this is 2nd of the rediscovered Sherlock Holmes adventures "acquired" from a widow whose husband was descended from the distaff side of Holmes's family, this mystery finds Holmes solving a double murder in London's theater district. "Don't miss it."--Cosmopolitan. The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD is a Sherlock Holmes pastiche novel by Nicholas Meyer, published in '76. It takes place after his other two Holmes pastiches, The Seven-Percent Solution & The Canary Trainer, tho it was published twixt the two. The plot concerns a series of strange murders in London's Theater District at the end of the 19th Century. Contrary to what the press has sometimes asserted, The West End Horror has nothing to do with (tho it arguably bears subtle references to) Jack the Ripper or his crimes. Altho this novel doesn't feature a dramatic action climax like Meyer's other two pastiches, the mystery's dénouement may well affect many more people than those of his other adventures. It also includes a 1st meeting between the great detective & Dr Moore Agar, whose "dramatic introduction to Holmes" was one Watson, in the original Arthur Conan Doyle story "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot", wrote that he "may some day recount."

30 review for The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD is a superior Sherlock Holmes pastiche novel by Nicholas Meyer, published in 1976. It takes place after his other two Holmes pastiches, "The Seven-Percent Solution" and "The Canary Trainer" (although it was published between the two.) Holmes solves a double murder in London's West End theatre district.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    Nicholas Meyer is my hero! He wrote STAR TREK II THE WRATH OF KHAN and he also wrote TIME AFTER TIME, two of the most amazing movies ever made. I thought they were great thirty years ago, and after seeing the junk they put out these days, like LOVE ACTUALLY and YESTERDAY, I'm even more impressed with his talent. So this book is a sequel to THE SEVEN PERCENT SOLUTION, the Sherlock Holmes sequel that was also a huge movie. I enjoyed the movie as a kid, but I wasn't blown away by it. I was a little Nicholas Meyer is my hero! He wrote STAR TREK II THE WRATH OF KHAN and he also wrote TIME AFTER TIME, two of the most amazing movies ever made. I thought they were great thirty years ago, and after seeing the junk they put out these days, like LOVE ACTUALLY and YESTERDAY, I'm even more impressed with his talent. So this book is a sequel to THE SEVEN PERCENT SOLUTION, the Sherlock Holmes sequel that was also a huge movie. I enjoyed the movie as a kid, but I wasn't blown away by it. I was a little too young for the sexual stuff, and even at twelve I was like, does Sherlock Holmes really need to have a drug problem for a modern audience to relate to him? Really? Luckily, there are no drug references in this book, and it's a lot of fun, though a little thin. Holmes and Watson get mixed up with a bunch of real-life legends in the London theater world. There are at least a half a dozen cameos. everyone from Oscar Wilde to George Bernard Shaw to Bram Stoker stops in to say hello. It was a lot of fun, but it felt like the murder mystery was stuck in almost as an after thought. Not to do spoilers, but it was more gruesome than gripping, and the killer was almost laughably conflicted when he finally revealed himself. So basically, I'm giving this book five stars because I want to show respect to my man Nicholas. But really it was more of a three star read, unless you really, really like seeing cameos by the people I mentioned. What I would have liked, really, was a lot less of Shaw and more of Stoker. Maybe if corpses started turning up all over London drained of blood, and Stoker insists that he knows who the killer is, but Scotland Yard laughs at him. So then Sherlock Holmes has to match wits with Dracula, and there are secrets Dracula can reveal that put the British crown at risk! ("All those guys suck. The whole royal family sucks. I'm Dracula, and I say they suck!")

  3. 4 out of 5

    Catie Currie

    I'm not going to rate this because I didn't even give it 3 chapters, but it was definitely not for me. I love Sherlock Holmes-- the original as well as some other authors' interpretations and TV and movie adaptions, so I was looking forward to this one. However, the writing was convoluted and the characters were flat and completely unlike the originals (which they were supposed to be, this isn't supposed to be like A Study in Scarlet Women or anything). I'm only marking this as read so I don't p I'm not going to rate this because I didn't even give it 3 chapters, but it was definitely not for me. I love Sherlock Holmes-- the original as well as some other authors' interpretations and TV and movie adaptions, so I was looking forward to this one. However, the writing was convoluted and the characters were flat and completely unlike the originals (which they were supposed to be, this isn't supposed to be like A Study in Scarlet Women or anything). I'm only marking this as read so I don't pick it up later.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aiden Heavilin

    Mystery is probably my least favorite genre. There's a variety of reasons, but the foremost has to be the sense of routine. Someone's been murdered! Interviews with the suspects... walking around the crime scene... visiting the morgue... At first they suspect person A but of course it's not the guy they first suspected, it is in fact person B all along! It's never been to my taste, and I struggle to force myself through a traditional mystery novel. Which makes my enjoyment of "The West End Horror Mystery is probably my least favorite genre. There's a variety of reasons, but the foremost has to be the sense of routine. Someone's been murdered! Interviews with the suspects... walking around the crime scene... visiting the morgue... At first they suspect person A but of course it's not the guy they first suspected, it is in fact person B all along! It's never been to my taste, and I struggle to force myself through a traditional mystery novel. Which makes my enjoyment of "The West End Horror" odd. This isn't the sort of book I usually like. It caught my eye at a Goodwill primarily due to the name of the author, Nicholas Meyer, the writer of one of the best sci-fi movies of all time, "Star Trek: Wrath of Khan". What further interested me was that although this is a Sherlock Holmes story, it is not a parody, or a pastiche. It is entirely sincere, not so much imitating Conan Doyle's style so much as simply attempting to tell a coherent, good story with his characters. Meyer creates interest in the routine suspect interviews by including many members of the art world at the time, Bram Stoker, George Bernard Shaw, Bram Stoker, Gilbert and Sullivan. The whole case deals with the theatre scene in England, and Meyer has a lot of fun with it. I enjoyed these parts that usually bore me. But what makes "The West End Horror" a truly excellent mystery novel is the ending. Without spoiling the novel, Meyer finds an extremely unique motivation and solution for the mystery. I found myself actually enthralled by the last 3 chapters, blazing through them. The finale of this novel is perfectly written and extremely original, more than justifying the slow build. Recently, "Star Trek: Wrath of Khan" suffered an awful remake, the execrable, "Star Trek: Into Darkness." Speaking about this film, Meyer said, "It is, on the one hand, nice to be so successful or beloved or however you want to describe it that somebody wants to do an homage to what you did and I was flattered and touched. But in my sort of artistic worldview, if you’re going to do an homage you have to add something. You have to put another layer on it, and they didn’t." To be sure, "The West End Horror" is an homage to Sherlock Holmes. But Meyer does add something, another "layer". It is not just a meaningless fanfiction, it is a solid novel in and of itself.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy Sturgis

    I enjoyed this Sherlock Holmes pastiche, especially the way it weaved historical figures such as George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde, and Bram Stoker into the action with Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. Stoker's segments tickled me, particularly. While this novel included a solid mystery (although this definitely is not part of the "Holmes vs. Jack the Ripper" subgenre, as some reviews I read seemed to imply), an interesting look behind the scenes into London's West End theatre culture at the time, I enjoyed this Sherlock Holmes pastiche, especially the way it weaved historical figures such as George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde, and Bram Stoker into the action with Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. Stoker's segments tickled me, particularly. While this novel included a solid mystery (although this definitely is not part of the "Holmes vs. Jack the Ripper" subgenre, as some reviews I read seemed to imply), an interesting look behind the scenes into London's West End theatre culture at the time, and plenty of connections to the Holmesian canon, Nicholas Meyer provides less insight into the characters of Holmes and Watson than he did in, for example, The Seven-Percent Solution. The "mystery" aspect of the story, however, was stronger in this work. All said, it was a quick and entertaining read, and I plan to continue on with The Canary Trainer to round out my reading of Meyer's Holmesian fiction.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Edward Erdelac

    I'm consistently impressed by Nicholas Meyer's Holmes pastiches. I was only aware of Seven Percent Solution which I read last year. When I found out about this one I immediately ordered it. Great book. The charactetizations (which to be fair, I usually only read mysteries for the characters - almost never for the detective aspect of the story) are spot on, and the inclusion of several real life personages including Oscar Wilde, and Gilbert & Sullivan were welcome, and a very amusing scene in whi I'm consistently impressed by Nicholas Meyer's Holmes pastiches. I was only aware of Seven Percent Solution which I read last year. When I found out about this one I immediately ordered it. Great book. The charactetizations (which to be fair, I usually only read mysteries for the characters - almost never for the detective aspect of the story) are spot on, and the inclusion of several real life personages including Oscar Wilde, and Gilbert & Sullivan were welcome, and a very amusing scene in which Holmes and Watson break into Bram Stoker's apartment and are appalled by his manuscript for Dracula had me smiling. The culprits' motivations were quite original. Didn't see them coming.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    "The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, M.D." by Nicholas Meyer" is another great Holmes mystery by the author of "The 7 Per Cent Solution". This time Holmes and Watson take on a murderer in the West End theatre district and meet, along the way, a bevy of literary suspects including: George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, and Gilbert & Sullivan, among other cameos. Great fun (especially if you can catch the rather witty literary references that abound) and a solid mu "The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, M.D." by Nicholas Meyer" is another great Holmes mystery by the author of "The 7 Per Cent Solution". This time Holmes and Watson take on a murderer in the West End theatre district and meet, along the way, a bevy of literary suspects including: George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, and Gilbert & Sullivan, among other cameos. Great fun (especially if you can catch the rather witty literary references that abound) and a solid murder mystery. Bravo, Nick Meyer!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This is fan fiction, but written more or less in Conan Doyle's style. It's well-crafted and has a few nice plot twists, just like the real thing. I finished it while in London, and spent a happy hour or two at the Sherlock Holmes Museum there.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    This book is an excellent pastiche of Holmes, with one very minor hiccup. Partway through the story something happens that screams "this is a clue" to the reader, but Holmes seemingly fails to notice it. On the other hand, the scenes in which Watson puts forth a theory about the case, and Holmes carefully points out the flaws in the reasoning were done well, and felt very much like the Doyle version of Holmes. Even the reason for the "lost" nature of the manuscript made sense, because it is true This book is an excellent pastiche of Holmes, with one very minor hiccup. Partway through the story something happens that screams "this is a clue" to the reader, but Holmes seemingly fails to notice it. On the other hand, the scenes in which Watson puts forth a theory about the case, and Holmes carefully points out the flaws in the reasoning were done well, and felt very much like the Doyle version of Holmes. Even the reason for the "lost" nature of the manuscript made sense, because it is true that hiding identities wouldn't have worked in this case. Other than that one flaw, the mystery part was very interesting, and the interweaving of historical characters felt smoothly done, given both the setting and their actual relationships. The short length of the book made this a very quick read, which was also enjoyable when one needed to flip back to a previous footnote, as happened once or twice to me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Again, the resolution was . . . surprising. The publisher should be pushing this one during the COVID-19 pandemic (Not to give away a spoiler). The case is timely and relevant to Spring '20. Again, Meyer's characterizations of Watson and Holmes are accurate, at least for the Watson and Holmes who have come to life through various other literary works, works of film and TV. In this one, we meet a host of literary characters: Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker to name just two. It was a fun, fast-paced, Again, the resolution was . . . surprising. The publisher should be pushing this one during the COVID-19 pandemic (Not to give away a spoiler). The case is timely and relevant to Spring '20. Again, Meyer's characterizations of Watson and Holmes are accurate, at least for the Watson and Holmes who have come to life through various other literary works, works of film and TV. In this one, we meet a host of literary characters: Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker to name just two. It was a fun, fast-paced, page-turner.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    The author, I thought, captured the voice of Doyle in this 'discovered' case of Holmes and Watson pretty well. Though enjoyable I thought the middle dragged just little bit and I found the act of the crime and resolution just weird. Even so, being transported to Sherlock's world was a good way to spend a few hours.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melissa McShane

    Nick Meyer's first novel, The Seven-Percent Solution, was a clever take on the Holmes mythology. Meyer used the existing Arthur Conan Doyle stories and associated now-canon writings to build a story in which Holmes encounters, and is treated by, Sigmund Freud. Meyer does the same thing in this book, where the mystery centers on the theatrical community of the West End. Holmes encounters Oscar Wilde, Bernard Shaw, Henry Irving, Bram Stoker, both Gilbert and Sullivan...the list goes on, which may Nick Meyer's first novel, The Seven-Percent Solution, was a clever take on the Holmes mythology. Meyer used the existing Arthur Conan Doyle stories and associated now-canon writings to build a story in which Holmes encounters, and is treated by, Sigmund Freud. Meyer does the same thing in this book, where the mystery centers on the theatrical community of the West End. Holmes encounters Oscar Wilde, Bernard Shaw, Henry Irving, Bram Stoker, both Gilbert and Sullivan...the list goes on, which may be part of the problem; yes, all these people associated with each other, but it still starts to sound like name-dropping. But the real problem is that the solution to the mystery is so blindingly obvious that even I figured it out, and I'm terrible at working out whodunit. If I can solve the case faster than Sherlock Holmes, there's something really wrong with the book. I think, if you don't guess the solution, it would seem like a clever twist; as it was, it just felt pedestrian. As pastiche, the book is pretty good. Meyer has a nice grasp of the language, and his footnotes are entertaining. The overall impression that this is a true Sherlock Holmes story persists (though Holmes and Watson's characters are more fleshed out than in the original stories, which I consider a plus). But as a mystery, it falls flat.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Clare Bell

    This is a delightful Sherlock Holmes pastiche by Nicholas Meyer, who also wrote The Seven Percent Solution. Deftly he weaves together historical events and people to create a fun romp through the London of Holmes and Watson. Included in the cast are George Bernard Shaw, Oliver Wilde, Henry Irving, Ellen Terry, Gilbert and Sullivan, and the author of Dracula, Bram Stoker. And Holmes and Watson are their redoubtable selves. Authur Conan Doyle would be proud.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Burrows

    Definitely one of the better Holmes pastiches that I've read, perhaps even one of my favorites actually. The whole book had a really nice flow and good imagery, I also liked how it didn't take itself too seriously (anyone who reads the book will understand what I mean), the storyline was also intriguing. I had a hard time putting the book down, and each chapter had me excited for what would come next.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Kucharski

    Enjoyed this tale, told in keeping with the spirit and intelligence of Doyle. A short mystery that begins with Bernard Shaw shows up at Holmes' place asking if he would solve a murder. Basically, short and enjoyable.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    Despite the title it's more mystery than horror, I think. It captures some of the neat stuff about the original Sherlock Holmes stories. It's a fun read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Keith

    The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD is the sequel to Nicholas Meyer's well-received 1993 novel The Seven-Percent Solution. As before, it is an authorized (by Arthur Conan Doyle's estate) reinvention of the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, carrying on the conventions of the Holmes literary oeuvre, immersing the pair in a complicated and eventually shocking mystery that leads them through London's theatrical demi-monde, and finally driving them to extremes t The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD is the sequel to Nicholas Meyer's well-received 1993 novel The Seven-Percent Solution. As before, it is an authorized (by Arthur Conan Doyle's estate) reinvention of the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, carrying on the conventions of the Holmes literary oeuvre, immersing the pair in a complicated and eventually shocking mystery that leads them through London's theatrical demi-monde, and finally driving them to extremes to save the day with impossible stakes on the table and against the bumbling interference of the regular police force. As with the classic Holmes literature, it is told in the first-person voice of Holmes's companion Dr. Watson, with Meyer in this case playing Conan Doyle's role of nominal editor and publisher. Meyer stays true to the genre (unlike some authors of Holmes pastiches, who delight in working the main character into improbable or ridiculous deviations), but evidences some of the personal quirks and signatures that marked his first effort along these lines. Fans of Holmes who - inevitably - yearn for more of his exploits, and fans of Meyer who enjoyed his first Holmes novel or the popular film based on it, will both be satisfied by this work. The challenge for "Sherlockians" (fans of the Holmes literature who take it seriously) who "play the game" (assert it is all factual, and thus must account for every historical reference and seeming contradiction in the canon) is filling in the gaps in Holmes's biography as discerned in the Conan Doyle corpus; for those who would write the history that fills those gaps, there is also the matter of explaining how they know what Dr. Watson did not. Meyer plays the game by attributing the "West End" story to Watson himself, in the form of a manuscript that Holmes made Watson promise would not be published in his lifetime, and that was later misplaced and sent to him through a circuitous route; he places the story in a short period between better-known cases in the canonical timeline (thus alleviating the difficulties of convincingly attributing to Holmes an unlikely resurrection from a watery grave, or a lost decade as a beekeeper, as other authors have done). That peculiar hurdle overcome, he spins a tale that hits upon many familiar Holmes touchstones, and even a bit of Watson's personal history, while rivaling the most popular of the traditional stories for horrific impact and exotic detail. As to authenticity, Meyer captures "Dr. Watson"'s tone exceptionally well. His version of Holmes reads like the real thing, and afficionados will be happy to see him hitting the marks of many of Holmes's familiar traits and tactics. At times, this can seem a little too facile, somewhat in the way of what the science-fiction writers call "fan service" - familiar elements of a story line put in simply because fans expect them. In this story Holmes shoots a reigning figure's name into his wall with bullet holes (in this case it is "DISRAELI," which may be Meyer tweaking the fans with the improbable volume of ordnance required), cozens his landlady Mrs. Hudson, is flighty and easily distracted when bored, displays his encyclopedic knowledge of cigar tobacco, classical violin music, and English history, demonstrates surprising expertise through obscure scholarly manuscripts, constantly jumps into, out of, and in one case onto Hansom cabs, throws himself on the floor with a magnifying glass to investigate a crime scene, reads the size, shape, and place of origin of a pair of shoes from invisible footprints on a carpet, recovers a missing message using the shopworn "reveal writing impressions by rubbing a pencil on the adjacent piece of paper" trick, amazes one character by reciting his travels by way of the mud on his pants, amazes another by identifying his birthplace and street of residence from his accent (thus sparking G.B. Shaw's inspiration for his later Pygmalion), identifies newspapers by the typeface of a single letter, mystifies his closest companions with impenetrable disguises, spars with Inspector Lestrade, condescends to Watson over the latter's inept criminological theorizing, spouts a few signature catch-phrases, and in general behaves in such a pointedly stereotypical manner at every moment that he might as well be wearing a nametag that reads "HELLO My Name Is Sherlock Holmes, famously eccentric detective". Meyer also indulges one of his personal fascinations, evident in The Seven-Percent Solution's playful liberties with Sigmund Freud: the weaving of historical personages into Holmes's cases, and often foreshadowing events from those characters' lives that they themselves do not yet know about, but the modern reader will delight to recognize. This is a charming conceit that gives Meyer's Holmes stories a distinctive voice, even while remaining true to the Conan Doyle standard. In The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD it gets a bit out of hand; the cast of peripheral characters includes not just the familiar Lestrade but George Bernard Shaw, Bram Stoker, Gilbert and Sullivan, D'Oyly Carte, Henry Irving, Ellen Terry, Oscar Wilde, "Bosie," and a (real) future chief of the London police detective bureau. Meyer is so busy dropping names and arranging coincidences that it may take a while to recognize that the actual mystery in this novel is rather thin. Two deaths in quick succession within the close-knit and Bohemian world of Victorian theater give rise to suspicions of deadly love triangles involving increasing numbers and convolutions of parties. Holmes senses something else at work, and must act quickly to find the truth, clear an innocent victim of the police's damning incompetence, and, in the very last pages, save all of Europe from an unimaginable fate. So, pretty much an ordinary case for him. Meyer strings it out to 170 pages, short for a novel, too long for what could have been a pretty successful, straightforward, Holmes short story. The book is lively, amusing, and enjoyable, what with the constant parade of famous characters and the hints at events readers will recognize from the history and works of those same - in this story - unknowing actors. There is also a certain vein of exoticism in the plot that arises naturally from its Conan Doyle origins, and is surely less overt than that, say, in "The Adventure of the Crooked Man" or some other canonical works. The book's flaws are forgivable, and the padding puts the mystery in a rich and evocative cultural context that contributes as much to the pleasure of reading it as does Holmes himself, and his triumphantly dogged detection. The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, MD is recommended for open-minded Sherlockians and more casual fans of the good detective, those who enjoyed Meyer's previous Holmes novel, and fans of light-hearted and fast-paced Victorian historical fiction.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mark Sohn

    As a Sherlock Holmes author myself (I detest the word 'pastiche') I read this with no small interest; I had just turned fifty and as part of my attempts to fend off Dark Thoughts I splurged, to use a modern term on several books. And a deerstalker. Anyway, this was one of the keenest-awaited of the new arrivals and it hasn't disappointed. The man writes more like Arthur Doyle than Doyle did himself; I try to match Doyle's style in my first work, but Mr. Meyer has hit the absolute bull with this As a Sherlock Holmes author myself (I detest the word 'pastiche') I read this with no small interest; I had just turned fifty and as part of my attempts to fend off Dark Thoughts I splurged, to use a modern term on several books. And a deerstalker. Anyway, this was one of the keenest-awaited of the new arrivals and it hasn't disappointed. The man writes more like Arthur Doyle than Doyle did himself; I try to match Doyle's style in my first work, but Mr. Meyer has hit the absolute bull with this one. I had seen little of his work before; the film version of The Seven Percent Solution, naturally - if you have yet to see this you aren't a complete Holmes fan by any means (Argue that among yourselves, please...) and this book just shines with the same light. The plot itself revolves around a murder committed at the fringes of London's showbusiness fraternity, then the dead man's mistress is killed in a brutal manner... Holmes is engaged by the Irish playwright Bernard Shaw to investigate the former crime and is embroiled in a blah-blah-you know the rest. Go out to the bookshops at once; then give up, return home and order a copy online. If lucky, you'll get a fairly minty copy such as mine... Wonderful work from the pen of a Master.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie :}

    My favorite part of Nicholas Meyers' Sherlock Holmes pastiches is always the forward: he spends the first few pages of each book going "OK OK GUYS HERE'S A LEGIT SHERLOCK HOLMES STORY AND HERE'S ALL MY EXCUSES FOR WHY IT DOESN'T FEEL LIKE ONE. " And it really doesn't feel like a Sherlock Holmes story. The writing style is too modern and American, and Meyers makes Sherlock Holmes far more human than the cold reasoning machine of the originals ever was. There's also the fact that Meyers always incl My favorite part of Nicholas Meyers' Sherlock Holmes pastiches is always the forward: he spends the first few pages of each book going "OK OK GUYS HERE'S A LEGIT SHERLOCK HOLMES STORY AND HERE'S ALL MY EXCUSES FOR WHY IT DOESN'T FEEL LIKE ONE. " And it really doesn't feel like a Sherlock Holmes story. The writing style is too modern and American, and Meyers makes Sherlock Holmes far more human than the cold reasoning machine of the originals ever was. There's also the fact that Meyers always includes real life people in his Holmes stories (in this one we had Shaw, Wilde, and others), which of course reminds you that this isn't Doyle's Holmes. But that's OK; it's still an entertaining novel. The mystery is quite good, and it's fun to see these characters portrayed in a more light -hearted way and to pretend they were real and interacted with other famous figures in history. Good fun, I say.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Knowles

    It's not quite as good as The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, but the Holmesian pastiche is just as good. The integration of Holmes into 1895 is great if a bit over-referential. The use of known literary and theatrical people does hinder the mystery, though. When the biggest suspect is (view spoiler)[a Bram Stoker who hasn't published Dracula (hide spoiler)] , the mystery can't really remain a mystery. I did like the eventual motive, but it's not set up terribly well. Still, it's an enjoyable Holmesian It's not quite as good as The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, but the Holmesian pastiche is just as good. The integration of Holmes into 1895 is great if a bit over-referential. The use of known literary and theatrical people does hinder the mystery, though. When the biggest suspect is (view spoiler)[a Bram Stoker who hasn't published Dracula (hide spoiler)] , the mystery can't really remain a mystery. I did like the eventual motive, but it's not set up terribly well. Still, it's an enjoyable Holmesian read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

    Having really enjoyed “The Seven-Per-Cent Solution” by Meyer I was excited to read his second volume of “rediscovered” Holmes stories. While I still had fun reading this volume I couldn’t help but feel slightly disappointed at the extent to which Meyer adds historical characters for no particular reason. From George Bernard Shaw to Oscar Wilde, Meyer seems to add them for no other reason than the mystery in question takes place in the theater world of 1890s London. This would have been fun in pa Having really enjoyed “The Seven-Per-Cent Solution” by Meyer I was excited to read his second volume of “rediscovered” Holmes stories. While I still had fun reading this volume I couldn’t help but feel slightly disappointed at the extent to which Meyer adds historical characters for no particular reason. From George Bernard Shaw to Oscar Wilde, Meyer seems to add them for no other reason than the mystery in question takes place in the theater world of 1890s London. This would have been fun in passing but I saw no reason to constantly allude to the beginning of Wilde’s legal troubles when these were in no way connected to the case. All in all, while still enough fun to finish reading, this book reminded me of the shorter, less memorable of the Sherlock Holmes stories.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    This was a fun romp, with Holmes and Watson going from one part of the West End theater community to the other, and a fairly well crafted mystery. It was fun seeing how a number of real people all knew or knew of each other, due to working in close proximity. If I had any complaints, it's that the major events that take place are all summarized at the very beginning, and I called who the culprit was - but that may have had more to do with other Goodreads reviewers saying that was obvious, leadin This was a fun romp, with Holmes and Watson going from one part of the West End theater community to the other, and a fairly well crafted mystery. It was fun seeing how a number of real people all knew or knew of each other, due to working in close proximity. If I had any complaints, it's that the major events that take place are all summarized at the very beginning, and I called who the culprit was - but that may have had more to do with other Goodreads reviewers saying that was obvious, leading me to look more closely for their identity. The how and why I didn't guess, though, and they turned out to be both shocking and surprisingly moving.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Hearon

    What fun. A treat for fans of Sherlock Holmes and Anglophiles in general. I don't think it is fair to denigrate this book as mere "fan-fiction" given the fact that the "fan" in question is an accomplished screenwriter and director (i.e. Star Trek/Wrath of Khan, Star Trek IV, The Voyage Home, Star Trek VI, The Undiscovered Country as well as Time After Time and The Day After). Like his more fully developed novel The Seven Percent Solution, I really enjoy his mixture of the Holmes mythology with a What fun. A treat for fans of Sherlock Holmes and Anglophiles in general. I don't think it is fair to denigrate this book as mere "fan-fiction" given the fact that the "fan" in question is an accomplished screenwriter and director (i.e. Star Trek/Wrath of Khan, Star Trek IV, The Voyage Home, Star Trek VI, The Undiscovered Country as well as Time After Time and The Day After). Like his more fully developed novel The Seven Percent Solution, I really enjoy his mixture of the Holmes mythology with actual historical characters, in this case including George Bernard Shaw and Oscar Wilde. Very light and a quick read, perfect for a rainy afternoon.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jose Luis Meza Garcia

    It was a good Sherlock / Watson case. What I don´t like is that each "new" SH adventure have to be a nation-threatening one. I understand that the escales have to be big, but some of the best Holmes stories were small cases. And if they were big (like The Sign of The Four) they weren´n nation-threatening, so I don´t understand why new writers try to do this. As for the case, it was entertaining. A good portrayal of Holmes and Watson almost always gives us a good story (if the writer knows what ma It was a good Sherlock / Watson case. What I don´t like is that each "new" SH adventure have to be a nation-threatening one. I understand that the escales have to be big, but some of the best Holmes stories were small cases. And if they were big (like The Sign of The Four) they weren´n nation-threatening, so I don´t understand why new writers try to do this. As for the case, it was entertaining. A good portrayal of Holmes and Watson almost always gives us a good story (if the writer knows what makes the characters tic then he can write a story akin to that; and the case didn´t disappoint, it was a good story, nor too short nor to lengthy. If you like Holmes give this one a try.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Lozano

    Entertaining, but not nearly as compelling as Meyer's previous Sherlock Holmes pastiche The Seven Per Cent Solution. This time he goes overboard on the historical celebrity guest cameos in service of a rather clumsy and contrived plot which demands no real personal stakes from Holmes or Watson, as the previous volume did. Also marred by unnecessary colloquial racist epithets that were quite off-putting. Close, but no Indian cigar.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cricket Muse

    As an encore to the well-received Seven Percent Solution, Meyers provides readers with another favored pastiche of Sherlockian venue. Meyers captures well the flavor and diction of Watson and even capably mimics some of the artful banter of the duo as Watson attempts to solve the mystery. The inclusion of famous characters sometimes hinders the otherwise intriguing plot, otherwise the story is a plausible case story that most Sherlock fans should appreciate.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    (I've known many a West End Horror in my day but that is a tale for another time. On with the review!) Nicholas Meyer is someone I owe a debt of gratitude to-really a lot of people do. Not only did he make Time After Time, one of my favorite movies, but he ensured the continuing popularity of the Star Trek franchise by making Star Trek II and Star Trek VI. And did I mention he writes a pitch perfect Sherlock Holmes? I had already read one of Meyer's previous Holmesian efforts, The Canary Trainer (I've known many a West End Horror in my day but that is a tale for another time. On with the review!) Nicholas Meyer is someone I owe a debt of gratitude to-really a lot of people do. Not only did he make Time After Time, one of my favorite movies, but he ensured the continuing popularity of the Star Trek franchise by making Star Trek II and Star Trek VI. And did I mention he writes a pitch perfect Sherlock Holmes? I had already read one of Meyer's previous Holmesian efforts, The Canary Trainer, and really enjoyed it. I was delighted to find a copy of The West End Horror, and really enjoyed reading it as well. The novel is steeped in the lore of Holmes and Watson, and features a fantastic supporting cast that includes Oscar Wilde, Gilbert and Sullivan, Bram Stoker, and Henry Irving. Meyer makes all of this work plus he gives us a good slowly unfolding mystery. Recommended.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joey Madia

    Nicholas Meyers is the master of the Holmes pastiche. And what a cast of characters... Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker, Gilbert and Sullivan, Henry Irving, Ellen Terry, George Bernard Shaw... richly researched with lots of easter eggs and homages, this is a must read. Even better than the Seven Percent Solution.

  29. 4 out of 5

    SusanwithaGoodBook

    This was a bit of fun. It’s supposed to be a lost record of a case involving a huge cast of famous theater people like Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, Gilbert and Sullivan...the list goes on and on. It’s a very clever idea and well done. I’m not a big mystery fan, but I’ve enjoyed the Holmes stories I’ve read. This was different, but a fun complement to the originals, imho.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tony Quintiliani

    Authentic Holmes! This book read very quickly and felt just like an original by Conan Doyle. Very cool how it combined many characters from the popular theater crowd of the period and interwove them throughout the book. I highly recommend it to any Sherlock Holmes enthusiast as well as anyone looking for a witty, quick and thrilling mystery.

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