counter create hit Invisible in the Storm: The Role of Mathematics in Understanding Weather - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Invisible in the Storm: The Role of Mathematics in Understanding Weather

Availability: Ready to download

An accessible book that examines the mathematics of weather prediction Invisible in the Storm is the first book to recount the history, personalities, and ideas behind one of the greatest scientific successes of modern times--the use of mathematics in weather prediction. Although humans have tried to forecast weather for millennia, mathematical principles were used in meteo An accessible book that examines the mathematics of weather prediction Invisible in the Storm is the first book to recount the history, personalities, and ideas behind one of the greatest scientific successes of modern times--the use of mathematics in weather prediction. Although humans have tried to forecast weather for millennia, mathematical principles were used in meteorology only after the turn of the twentieth century. From the first proposal for using mathematics to predict weather, to the supercomputers that now process meteorological information gathered from satellites and weather stations, Ian Roulstone and John Norbury narrate the groundbreaking evolution of modern forecasting. The authors begin with Vilhelm Bjerknes, a Norwegian physicist and meteorologist who in 1904 came up with a method now known as numerical weather prediction. Although his proposed calculations could not be implemented without computers, his early attempts, along with those of Lewis Fry Richardson, marked a turning point in atmospheric science. Roulstone and Norbury describe the discovery of chaos theory's butterfly effect, in which tiny variations in initial conditions produce large variations in the long-term behavior of a system--dashing the hopes of perfect predictability for weather patterns. They explore how weather forecasters today formulate their ideas through state-of-the-art mathematics, taking into account limitations to predictability. Millions of variables--known, unknown, and approximate--as well as billions of calculations, are involved in every forecast, producing informative and fascinating modern computer simulations of the Earth system. Accessible and timely, Invisible in the Storm explains the crucial role of mathematics in understanding the ever-changing weather.


Compare

An accessible book that examines the mathematics of weather prediction Invisible in the Storm is the first book to recount the history, personalities, and ideas behind one of the greatest scientific successes of modern times--the use of mathematics in weather prediction. Although humans have tried to forecast weather for millennia, mathematical principles were used in meteo An accessible book that examines the mathematics of weather prediction Invisible in the Storm is the first book to recount the history, personalities, and ideas behind one of the greatest scientific successes of modern times--the use of mathematics in weather prediction. Although humans have tried to forecast weather for millennia, mathematical principles were used in meteorology only after the turn of the twentieth century. From the first proposal for using mathematics to predict weather, to the supercomputers that now process meteorological information gathered from satellites and weather stations, Ian Roulstone and John Norbury narrate the groundbreaking evolution of modern forecasting. The authors begin with Vilhelm Bjerknes, a Norwegian physicist and meteorologist who in 1904 came up with a method now known as numerical weather prediction. Although his proposed calculations could not be implemented without computers, his early attempts, along with those of Lewis Fry Richardson, marked a turning point in atmospheric science. Roulstone and Norbury describe the discovery of chaos theory's butterfly effect, in which tiny variations in initial conditions produce large variations in the long-term behavior of a system--dashing the hopes of perfect predictability for weather patterns. They explore how weather forecasters today formulate their ideas through state-of-the-art mathematics, taking into account limitations to predictability. Millions of variables--known, unknown, and approximate--as well as billions of calculations, are involved in every forecast, producing informative and fascinating modern computer simulations of the Earth system. Accessible and timely, Invisible in the Storm explains the crucial role of mathematics in understanding the ever-changing weather.

44 review for Invisible in the Storm: The Role of Mathematics in Understanding Weather

  1. 4 out of 5

    Loraine

    I did not want to have to work this hard to understand the principles of weather prediction. It's not because the book is poorly done, rather it's because weather is VERY complicated. The book does a great job of isolating the densest of the math concepts in sidebars, but the science is still very heavy and dense to someone who just wanted a popularized version of the science. I enjoyed the history of the development of meteorology and managed to grasp a few key concepts but it was a tough go. H I did not want to have to work this hard to understand the principles of weather prediction. It's not because the book is poorly done, rather it's because weather is VERY complicated. The book does a great job of isolating the densest of the math concepts in sidebars, but the science is still very heavy and dense to someone who just wanted a popularized version of the science. I enjoyed the history of the development of meteorology and managed to grasp a few key concepts but it was a tough go. Had I not been reading it for a course, which gave me the benefit of exchanging ideas and questions with others, I doubt I would have learned as much as I did.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bob Gustafson

    This was a really difficult read. As an undergraduate, I studied calculus and analytic geometry and differential equations, and I didn't understand what was more difficult, modeling the weather or explaining how the weather is modeled. About 70% of the way through the book, the author introduced the concept of "state space", systems of differential equations which seemed to be the key to opening the door, but it wasn't. Leave this book alone unless you have studied fluid dynamics or thermodynamic This was a really difficult read. As an undergraduate, I studied calculus and analytic geometry and differential equations, and I didn't understand what was more difficult, modeling the weather or explaining how the weather is modeled. About 70% of the way through the book, the author introduced the concept of "state space", systems of differential equations which seemed to be the key to opening the door, but it wasn't. Leave this book alone unless you have studied fluid dynamics or thermodynamics at the university level.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve Gross

    If you like advanced mathematics and dense weather descriptions, this is the book for you.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bojan Tunguz

    Weather has always been one of the most consequential and most unpredictable aspects of our World. The importance of weather on all facets of human life cannot be underestimated. Storms and hurricanes can have a huge impact, and even less dramatic weather patterns (such as droughts) are of enormous significance. It is no surprise that people have been trying to predict weather for as long as there are any records of civilization, and perhaps for much longer. However, aside from some folk wisdom Weather has always been one of the most consequential and most unpredictable aspects of our World. The importance of weather on all facets of human life cannot be underestimated. Storms and hurricanes can have a huge impact, and even less dramatic weather patterns (such as droughts) are of enormous significance. It is no surprise that people have been trying to predict weather for as long as there are any records of civilization, and perhaps for much longer. However, aside from some folk wisdom and very rough rules of thumb, until very recently predicting weather has been little more than guesswork. Things started changing towards the end of the nineteenth century, when a combination of better understanding of the laws of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and overall weather patters convinced many scientists that weather forecasting is, in principle, within the reach of the scientific method. Implementing that vision has been far from easy though, and that program has had many obstacles that it needed to overcome. “Invisible in the Storm” is the story of the development of modern scientific meteorology. In particular, it tells the story about the importance of mathematics and its use in solving the problem of weather. It turns out that the equations that we use to model the weather are very complicated and complex, and at best we can hope to have very approximate solutions. Early advances in the mathematical weather modeling had to rely more on some shorthand and general principles that could be judiciously applied to some already observed situations. The full exact solution of the weather equations will probably elude us forever, and even approximate solutions are almost impossible to construct. This is partly due to the phenomenon of “chaos” that has in fact first been widely studied and appreciated exactly in the context of the weather. The alternative to the exact solutions was to use the numerical methods in which smooth functions are replaced by their “pixelated” equivalents. Numerical methods reduce the extremely complicated differential equations with somewhat less complicated and manageable sets of algebraic equations. However, even the simplest numerical methods involve thousands of variables and equations, and early attempts to solve those were nothing short of heroic. Furthermore, the solutions of those early numerical attempts were disastrous in terms of their accuracy. Numerical methods only gained traction with the advent of computers, and only within the last couple of decades were we able to make reasonably accurate predictions that go beyond a single day. This is a thoroughly well written and researched book. If you were unfamiliar with the content of mathematical research in meteorology it would be an incredibly valuable resource and an introduction to this subject. The authors clearly understand their subject, both in terms of its content as well as the rich and interesting history. All of the more mathematically advanced topics are covered in separate boxes throughout the main text, and if higher math is not something that you are familiar with you can safely skip those. Nonetheless, you should be fairly well educated and versed in the scientific method in order to fully appreciate this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robert Manson-Sawko

    I am a scientist with some background knowledge in fluid mechanics and not a native speaker of English. This is a serious and a seriously good book! I have already gone back to it several times to re-read some passages and will surely do this again in the future. I also used the book as a map to guide me through the internet for some further reading and study. The book takes you on a journey of discovery in what I think will be deemed as one of the greatest scientific achievement of the XX century I am a scientist with some background knowledge in fluid mechanics and not a native speaker of English. This is a serious and a seriously good book! I have already gone back to it several times to re-read some passages and will surely do this again in the future. I also used the book as a map to guide me through the internet for some further reading and study. The book takes you on a journey of discovery in what I think will be deemed as one of the greatest scientific achievement of the XX century and in some way is shaping the current political debate over climate. It links many characters and developments into a single compelling narrative. The historical background of progress is very well researched and captures some truly moving and even formative stories that I would recommend to anyone, but to science audience in particular. I'd like to thank the author for including technical information and presenting it in such an illustrative manner. This is not a condescending popular science book or a book which goes into personal digressions and opinions of the author. It is focused on the subject and presents it phenomenally well. Not being a native speaker and despite knowing a little about fluid dynamics I found the vocabulary challenging in the second half of the book. This is no fault of the author, who introduces all these terms, but simply reflects how much we learnt about the weather. I thought that the final chapters were a little thin on the technical aspects and too much on the manifesto side. I was expecting to learn a bit more about the inversion, ensemble forecasting and other data aspects, but it was only covered at a fairly basic level. Instead there were quite a few paragraphs dedicated to the power of various mathematical methods working in tandem to tackle the problem of weather. I think by this point in the book all the readers are convinced of this and want to learn more about the present day forecasting and its nuances. Understandably though, this is not a textbook and if you're looking for a comprehensive historical review of the subject, an example of applied mathematics at work as well as sufficient, but not exhaustive technical detail to understand the nature of the discoveries this is certainly a book for you.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Damien Irving

    I'm a postdoctoral climate scientist and this is quite simply the best plain language historical account of meteorology that I've ever read. It is a must read for weather enthusiasts, undergraduate meteorology students, postgraduate students and professional scientists alike. I only wish it had been available during my university days, as it would have greatly accelerated my learning. I'm a postdoctoral climate scientist and this is quite simply the best plain language historical account of meteorology that I've ever read. It is a must read for weather enthusiasts, undergraduate meteorology students, postgraduate students and professional scientists alike. I only wish it had been available during my university days, as it would have greatly accelerated my learning.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bogdan Antonescu

    An excellent book on the history and role of mathematics in meteorology.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lars

  10. 4 out of 5

    Javzmaa

  11. 5 out of 5

    Victor

  12. 5 out of 5

    Raphael

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jacobsca

  14. 5 out of 5

    JP Canny

  15. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  17. 5 out of 5

    Simen Eide

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  19. 5 out of 5

    Allan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Nicholson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mtk

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sbonk

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  27. 4 out of 5

    David Schwan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Silvia Iorgova

  29. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  30. 4 out of 5

    Edward

  31. 4 out of 5

    Justin Liew

  32. 4 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  33. 4 out of 5

    Arielle88

  34. 5 out of 5

    Sumesh

  35. 4 out of 5

    Richard Pace

  36. 4 out of 5

    Xinbo Qian

  37. 5 out of 5

    Phang Seow

  38. 4 out of 5

    jeffrey

  39. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Hotchkiss

  40. 5 out of 5

    Tyrone

  41. 4 out of 5

    Juste

  42. 5 out of 5

    Oliver

  43. 5 out of 5

    Frederico Nogueira

  44. 5 out of 5

    Franziska Koeppen

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.