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Showcase Presents: DC Comics Presents: Superman Team-Ups, Vol. 2

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Superman battles for justice alongside DC's greatest heroes including Martian Manhunterm Supergirl, The Spectre, Black Canary, Robin, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Aquaman and many more in this massive, value-priced title. DC COMICS PRESENTS #27-50 and DC COMICS PRESENTS ANNUAL #1


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Superman battles for justice alongside DC's greatest heroes including Martian Manhunterm Supergirl, The Spectre, Black Canary, Robin, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Aquaman and many more in this massive, value-priced title. DC COMICS PRESENTS #27-50 and DC COMICS PRESENTS ANNUAL #1

30 review for Showcase Presents: DC Comics Presents: Superman Team-Ups, Vol. 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    I have to give this one two stars overall. The problem with a lot of these Team-Up Anthology stories is that there are four type of stories you tend to get. You get some stories that are just about perfect but on the other extreme you get some complete turds. Then you get some stories that are entertaining enough but sort of forgettable. Last but not least you an issue of two that would be pretty good if you were following the team-up characters main title. Most of the time these are cases where I have to give this one two stars overall. The problem with a lot of these Team-Up Anthology stories is that there are four type of stories you tend to get. You get some stories that are just about perfect but on the other extreme you get some complete turds. Then you get some stories that are entertaining enough but sort of forgettable. Last but not least you an issue of two that would be pretty good if you were following the team-up characters main title. Most of the time these are cases where that title were either close to cancellation or had just been cancelled. At DC the writer's were often offered the chance to write Superman or Batman into a story near their series finale so that one of two things could happen. Either A: it could run in that book giving it a gauranteed sales boost and maybe give them an extra issue or two to finish or B: run in the team up book and maybe some people who liked it would go to their local comic shop and pick up the title on a whim. Now, let's do a quick break down. It starts off strong with The Warworld trilogy (Issues #27-29) which featured Superman with Martian Manhunter, Supergirl and The Spectre. It Introduced Mongul and Warworld. It's epic stuff. After that was a forgettable and sort of rushed Black Canary team up. It might have been a better story if the story had a little more space to breath. But this story was done in the dying days of the 'backup strip' so the last six to eight pages were eaten up by a 'Whatever Happened To?' story. (DC should do a reprint of all of those. A lot of them were really cool.) It was followed by another turd- Superman teaming up with Robin. It's a story that wouldn't have been that out of place in World's Finest. While that was (usually) a Superman/Batman team up books they did the occasional Superman or Batman teaming up with other members of the opposite family. Though regardless of which title it saw print in, a turd is a turd. The Superman and Wonder Woman story is kind of campy and inevitable. It wasn't the first time the Superman and Wonder Woman pairing had sprung up nor the last. And far, far, from the best. Right when I was getting sick of the book having substandard stories along came a rather silly but really fun Superman and Shazam! Family two parter. It's goof but well worth the read. Next up cam Man-Bat... and there were some neat ideas here. But they sort of failed in execution. Next was on of those issues where I'm sure it would have seemed like a better idea if I had read the Prince Gavyn Starman stories. It sort of picked up Mongul where Warworld left off. But really, it sort of felt like Levitz and Starlin were saying: 'we'll never be allowed to finish this story if we don't do it in DCCP so damn it, that's what we're gonna do.' From there a Hawkgirl team up. On top of that another 'lost Kryptonian artifact story'. Really, with all the lost artifacts, lumps of Kryptonite and 'other survivors' you would think that Jor'el, Lara and their house were the only thing that died in the explosion. (Even their dog survived.) I wanted to like The Flash team up. it had an interesting premise and it wasn't like they were doing yet ANOTHER Superman and Flash race. Those get tiresome after awhle. The Plastic Man story was goofy, light hearted and fun. I think it would have been even funnier if his run from Adventure Comcis had been reprinted. The Adventure era was a weird time for Plastic Man as they attempted to find a middle ground between the classic 40s-50s Plastic Man and the goofy version from Saturday morning cartoons. Much like the Black Canary issue, the Metamorpho story needed a little more space to grow. And because of that it seemed sort of rushed and just sort of there. The Joker story was an odd duck. In a way it was a throwback to the 70s Joker series where Joker was almost a hero. But nope, much like when Brave and the Bold stories that relied on this gimmick it was all 'he was our the heroes side until he wasn't'. The Unknown Soldier story had no reason to be good as it was. DC has tried mixing 'other titles' character with super heroes and it usually falls flat. To be threatening to say Superman means a situation that is out and out ridiculous for a well trained spy and army guy to help. Only somehow, it works. I'm a sucker for the Legion of Super Heroes so I really liked their appearance. I have this one in single issue (and color) in storage but I really liked this story. The Dial H story is weird. The revival of Dial H for Hero was all kinds of terrible and this coming from someone who like what happened to these characters later and LOVES the Dial H concept. It was well intentioned but just so nostalgia driven that it didn't stand on its own two legs. But this team up makes the book it team up with look a thousand times better than it actually was. I actually liked this one. The Firestorm story was great. But really you had me at Gerry Conway writing a Firestorm and Superman team-up. Right when the book started to get good again, they did a Global Guardians team up. Which was a 24 pages story but felt more like eight or nine of those free insert comic that DC used to do around this time as promotional items that virtually identical plots and for whatever reason they decided to slap into an issue of DCP instead. Then we get to issues 47. The infamous Superman meets the Masters of the Universe story. DC looked at the success Marvel had with their licensed books of the time. (Rom and Micronaughts) They were peeved that they didn't have a licensed hit they could crossover with their books. They found the He-Man license available and snatched it up good. And to immortalize it, they slapped He-Man and Superman together for two stories and then did a Masters of the Universe miniseries. And then never published another licensed book that directly crossed directly into real DCU continuity again. Most of the stars lost are because of this issue alone. Really the He-Man issue is so bad that it made the just blah Aquaman story seem like a relief. But then came another Shazam! issue. It wasn't quite as goofy or fun as the other one but I think it had a better story and it told it very, very, well. The DC Comics Present Annual- Earth-One Superman meets Earth-Two Superman. That was just great. There is no reason that couldn't/shouldn't have been the Action Comics or Superman annual that year. How DCP, normally home inventory stories lucked out and got it I don't know. But it is well worth the read. Last but not least is DC Comics Presents #50. Again, there is no reason this couldn't have been an issue of Action Comics or Superman. But it is a real gem. Even if it is sort of a rip off of the classic Star Trek episode 'The Enemy Within'. It does a nice twist of what would happen if Superman were split not along lines of 'good' and 'evil' but Superman and Clark Kent. Mishkin and Cohn seemed to truly get that what makes Superman super isn't his power but his willingness to help others. That doesn't come from Krypton, but Smallville, Kansas. At the same time, without Superman, Clark Kent is a very good natured, thoughtful and intelligent man with no means or ability to do what he feels needs to get done.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bob Garrett

    Picking up right where Volume One left off, SHOWCASE PRESENTS: DC COMICS PRESENTS SUPERMAN TEAM-UPS, VOLUME TWO (Now, there’s a mouthful of a title!) gives us another twenty-four issues, plus a double sized “annual,” of DC COMICS PRESENTS, for a total of 561 pages. These stories were originally published in 1980-1982, and as with the stories in Volume One, they are presented in black and white, on relatively cheap paper. By foregoing color and high quality paper, however, you get a mammoth amoun Picking up right where Volume One left off, SHOWCASE PRESENTS: DC COMICS PRESENTS SUPERMAN TEAM-UPS, VOLUME TWO (Now, there’s a mouthful of a title!) gives us another twenty-four issues, plus a double sized “annual,” of DC COMICS PRESENTS, for a total of 561 pages. These stories were originally published in 1980-1982, and as with the stories in Volume One, they are presented in black and white, on relatively cheap paper. By foregoing color and high quality paper, however, you get a mammoth amount of material for a relatively cheap price. Once again, completists should be aware that only the main Superman team-up tale of each issue is presented here. Thus, you will find no installments of “Whatever Happened to?”...a recurring back up feature that focused on “forgotten” Golden and Silver Age superheroes. The bonus sixteen page Wonder Woman promotional comic from DC COMICS PRESENTS #41 is also missing, as is the two page “pin-up” advertised on the cover of DC COMICS PRESENTS #50. When the cover says “Superman Team-Ups,” it means exactly that. When I consider both volumes individually, I’d say that I probably, on the whole, enjoyed Volume One a little more than Volume Two. I think that Volume One had more consistency and a greater number of strong stories. In contrast, Volume Two contains some real standouts (a few better than any story in Volume One) but also some greater misses. I’ll take the standouts first. For me, the best is the “parallel Earths story”by Marv Wolfman and Rich Buckler, originally published in DC COMICS PRESENTS ANNUAL #1. Fans know all about DC’s alternate Earths, but newbies will be filled in pretty quickly. Suffice it to say that Superman visits “Earth 2,” where the Superman of the 1940s now lives as an older man, happily married to Lois Lane. There are some great character moments between the two Supermen and a nice examination of the Superman/Lois Lane relationship in an epic conflict between two Supermen and two Luthors. While this may be the best story, I do have other favorites. This volume’s first three tales, drawn and plotted by Jim Starlin in collaboration with writer Len Wein, collectively provide a cosmic epic with a new villain, Mongul. Mongul is highly reminiscent of Thanos, a Starlin creation for Marvel who is himself reminiscent of Darkseid, a Jack Kirby creation for DC. While Mongul isn’t an especially original character, his debut three-part epic is quite grand, with guest stars the Martian Manhunter, Supergirl and the Spectre. Mongul appears two other times in this volume, with a Legion of Super Heroes team-up (issue #43) by famed Legion writer Paul Levitz and artist Curt Swan being especially notable. Levitz also contributes a great meditation on war (#42) with guest star the Unknown Soldier. I also liked a lighter tale with Wonder Woman (#32) by Gerry Conway and Kurt Schaffenberger, a pair of science fiction-heavy tales by writer Martin Pasko that feature Man-Bat (#35, with Curt Swan art) and the Flash (#38, with Don Heck art), and a wild yarn with Aquaman (#48) by Dan Miskin, Gary Cohn and Irv Novick. For many fans, the presence of a favorite character or creator can elevate a story. In my case, I have fond memories of Firestorm, and thus, I greatly enjoyed his appearance in DCCP #45, written by his co-creator, Gerry Conway, and drawn by Rich Buckler. In contrast, I can’t love the original Captain Marvel (now known as Shazam) as much as writer Roy Thomas, who features him in three(!) separate issues (#s 33-34 and 49), but I know that some will be delighted to see him. Similarly, fans of the Joker might like seeing that character in issue #41, but while that issue's story, by Martin Pasko, is only okay to me, I did greatly enjoy the art by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez. Garcia-Lopez’s art also improves an otherwise unremarkable Superman/Robin team-up (#31) written by Gerry Conway. For me, artist Curt Swan similarly elevates a number of other stories, including one (#47) in which Superman meets He-Man and the Masters of the Universe. He-Man was “after my time,” but I suspect that readers a little younger than me might be genuinely curious about this not-yet-fully formed version of the character (The MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE cartoon would not debut for another year.). Unfortunately, there are some genuine disappointments. DCCP #36, for example, wraps up the short-lived 1980s Starman series in a way that seems particularly uninspired, despite the talents of writer Paul Levitz and artist Jim Starlin. Starlin (whose work I generally like a great deal) also let me down in a Hawkgirl team-up (#37) that concerned yet another Kryptonian ancestor of Superman and too much explication, and I fail to see how the two Dial H for Hero protagonists (They appear in issue #44, by Bob Rozakis, E. Nelson Bridwell and Irv Novick) could interest anyone over the age of twelve. The nadir, however, comes in DC COMICS PRESENTS #46, by E. Nelson Bridell and Alex Saviuk. In this extremely formulaic and predictable story, Superman teams with a group of international heroes, collectively known as the Global Guardians. Each of the international heroes is a cringe worthy stereotype, and examples include an Irish hero named Jack O’ Lantern who speaks in a thick brogue, an Israeli hero named the Seraph who has Old Testament-inspired powers, and a Japanese hero called the Rising Sun. Of course, I knew that there would be highs and lows, even before I began reading the book. It’s the nature of the old team-up series format, especially when you have a rotating group of creators, as you have here. While this second volume of Superman team-ups may have both greater highs and greater lows than the first volume, it’s still an enjoyable read overall, and if you liked Volume One, then you will almost certainly like Volume Two.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael Allan Leonard

    Team-up books like DC Comics Presents are the equivalent of a superhero grab-bag -- with rotating creative teams and a different guest-star each issue, the only real constant is the Man of Steel, presented here in his early 1980s pre-Crisis flagship glory, just before Batman stole the crown of being DC's most 'important' and popular character. Add in the complication of DCP's main feature only running 17 pages per issue, and virtually all of the tales being done-in-one single-issue stories, and Team-up books like DC Comics Presents are the equivalent of a superhero grab-bag -- with rotating creative teams and a different guest-star each issue, the only real constant is the Man of Steel, presented here in his early 1980s pre-Crisis flagship glory, just before Batman stole the crown of being DC's most 'important' and popular character. Add in the complication of DCP's main feature only running 17 pages per issue, and virtually all of the tales being done-in-one single-issue stories, and you've got a pressure-cooker paradigm where the stories have to hit the ground running and never stop to consider just how flimsy the stripped-down plots may be as they race toward the climax. Subtle and elegant, these comics ain't, but they have their charms, just the same, with a few unexpected twists and turns in the mostly formulaic mix -- like a Spectre / Superman encounter where God (y'know, Spectre's boss) shows up to help teach Superman a lesson in humility. Or perhaps the strangest and most squee-worthy story of the collection, in which DC takes full advantage of licensing with a true Clash of the Titans as Superman travels from Metropolis to Eternia and encounters the Masters of the Universe, including a throw-down with He-Man himself. The pure geek pleasure of watching a smug Superman literally tell an infuriated Skeletor that he's kind of 'meh' as far as villains go is worth the price of admission alone. The cover-featured unlikely 'team-up' with the Joker is also brilliantly executed: when the Joker and Prankster form an uneasy alliance that predictably ends badly, Superman is forced to work briefly with the Clown Prince of Crime to save Perry White from the Prankster's clutches. Bonus nerd points for a scene where Clark Kent phones Wayne Manor not to talk to Bruce Wayne but to Alfred, letting him know that Superman will be handling the Joker's latest rampage while Batman recovers from injuries (complete with an overprotective Robin trying to keep a bandaged Bruce from pulling on his costume and getting out of bed in the background). Clearly, Clark has no real idea what he's in for until he's S-shield deep in the Joker's lethal body-count shenanigans ... Mileage here truly will vary, but there is plenty of solid effort from a host of talented mainstay writers and artists of the late Bronze Age, including Marv Wolfman, Len Wein, Gerry Conway, Jim Starlin, Jose Garcia-Lopez, and Curt Swan, and the guest-star roster includes appearances by A-listers like Wonder Woman, Flash, Robin, Supergirl, and Captain Marvel, with smattering of newcomers like Firestorm and a space-opera pulp-inspired iteration of Starman, and lesser-knowns like Metamorpho, Man-Bat, and Dial H for Hero. Superman fans will likely not be disappointed -- even though many of the stories are somewhat pedestrian and 'throwaway', this is a last glimpse of the classic Man of Steel at his most polished, indestructible sheen, before a seemingly endless series of de-powerings and reboots in the decades to follow.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    This book collects Issues 27-50 of DC Comics Presents and Annual #1 featuring Superman team-ups during the 198s0. It is a bit of a mixed bag. The good: -The stories with Mongul. This book has Mongul's first four appearances. In Issue 27 and 28, he appears and we see him as this menace and get introduced to Warworld. Supergirl is epic in Issue #28 in the battle against Warworld. A later issue has him teaming up with the Bronze Age Starman Prince Gavin who has ascended to the throne after his siste This book collects Issues 27-50 of DC Comics Presents and Annual #1 featuring Superman team-ups during the 198s0. It is a bit of a mixed bag. The good: -The stories with Mongul. This book has Mongul's first four appearances. In Issue 27 and 28, he appears and we see him as this menace and get introduced to Warworld. Supergirl is epic in Issue #28 in the battle against Warworld. A later issue has him teaming up with the Bronze Age Starman Prince Gavin who has ascended to the throne after his sister's death. -The psychological stuff. While I do have issues with their characterization of Superman, they do have some good stuff that takes a look at the Man of Steel's psychology. Issue #28 has a confrontation with the Specter after an adventure where his cousin Kara has gone missing as the Specter tries to make him face some facts. Annual #2 features a team-up between Bronze-Age Superman and Golden Age Superman as they fight both of their Luthors. It’s not only fun story but also allows an older married Superman to give him some advice. Than Issue #50 features Clark and Superman getting split It’s a much better than happened in Superman IIh. -The stories with the Marvel family are good as Issues 33 and 34 have them dealing with swapped powers and a team-up between Mister Mxyzptlk and Mister Mind. It’s a really fun classic adventure. Then in Issue #49, you have a story featuring Earth-1’s Billy Batson who dreams of being Captain Marvel (Shazam) but faces a real crisis with Black Adam comes to our world and Superman has to help out the powerless Billy. -The team-up with Hawkgirl in Issue 37. I wasn’t expecting to like this one as much as I did but the Pre-Crisis Hawkgirl is really good in this as Superman deals with proof that one of his ancestor’s visited Earth. Superman and Hawkgirl have to find out what happened to Sup’s ancestor without getting killed. -In Issue #41, Superman (as Clark Kent) is out in Hollywood with Perry White, who is then kidnapped by he Joker and the Prankster. When the Prankster tries to doublecross the Joker, the latter teams up with Superman to stop the Prankster and hopefully save Perry White. Well done, including the much expected “twist.” -I’d say that Issues 32 (with Wonder Woman) and Issue #38 (with the Flash) are both fine stories. They’re not great, but they are pretty good stories involving Superman teaming with some of the best known Justice League colleagues. -The art is pretty good throughout the series with several issues being drawn by Curtis Swann and some of the space stories being drawn by Jim Starlin Beyond the issues mentioned, I think most of the stories in the book are merely okay with pretty routine match-ups between and under-powered heroes against somewhat weak villains. These stories aren’t bad, but they’re forgettable. Overall, the book’s stronger points make it worth reading, even though there are a lot of very ordinary stories in there.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Steven Heywood

    A mixed bag, mostly so-so with a couple providing a little extra.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Skjam!

    The dedicated rotating team-up series was a huge boon for DC Comics and Marvel back in the day. A top-selling character anchors the book (in this case Superman) and rotating guest stars got a chance to shine. Some appearances were to promote their own new series, others were to wrap up a plot of a recently canceled book, even more were to make sure DC kept the trademark on a less active character in house, and a few were just because the writer had a cool idea for a story. Volume 2 covers from 19 The dedicated rotating team-up series was a huge boon for DC Comics and Marvel back in the day. A top-selling character anchors the book (in this case Superman) and rotating guest stars got a chance to shine. Some appearances were to promote their own new series, others were to wrap up a plot of a recently canceled book, even more were to make sure DC kept the trademark on a less active character in house, and a few were just because the writer had a cool idea for a story. Volume 2 covers from 1980 to 1982, including the first annual and issue #50. We start with a three-parter introducing Jim Starlin-created villain Mongul and his quest for a Warworld of his very own. One of the problems with writing Superman team-ups is creating menaces that both challenge the Man of Tomorrow and allow the guest star to contribute. Mongul tended towards the “stronger than Superman” end, so it’s a good thing the guest stars were the Martian Manhunter, Supergirl and the Spectre. On the opposite end of the scale is Issue #39’s team-up with Plastic Man, where they fought dueling villains Toyman and Dollface. This one required heavy use of Kryptonite to slow Superman down. Some nice Joe Staton art, and a Karl Malden joke. #41 brings us the cover story, which is not so much Superman teaming up with the Joker, as the Joker wanting revenge on the Prankster after the very similar villain double-crosses him during their team-up. The whole story feels very much like Martin Pasko took a Los Angeles vacation and decided to work the location into a paid script. The story sidelines Batman with an injury as this is not World’s Finest. #42 has one of the weirder crossovers, with the Unknown Soldier, a disguise expert (real name unknown) who died in World War Two. The Paul Levitz script is based heavily on the paranoia about nuclear war being imminent so common in the early 1980s before the Soviets blinked. The Global Guardians had been introduced in the Superfriends tie-in comic book, but issue #46 of this series brought them into the main DC continuity. A fun issue with some interesting wizard villains from different cultures. #47 was a crossover with the Masters of the Universe tie-in comic book DC was doing at the time. He-Man mentions that his mother (who is originally from Earth) had told him tales of Superman. Annual #1 has a rare team-up of the Golden Age Superman with the then-current Man of Steel. Their versions of Luthor change places, but still fail to overcome the other Supermen; but then they head to Earth-3 and team up with that world’s evil Ultraman (who becomes stronger from Kryptonite exposure.) Our heroes must team up with Alex Luthor, who becomes Earth-3’s first superhero at the request of Lois Lane. (This is a bit confusing as named characters on Earth-Three have flipped morality…so does this mean that regular Lois is evil?) And we wrap up with #50, which has Superman team up with…Clark Kent?! Alien science has separated the two, making Superman lose touch with humanity, while Clark loses much of his timid persona. They must work together to save an alien world and California, before finding a way to merge again. As with all the Showcase volume, these reprints are in black and white. This is only a bit of a problem in the Plastic Man story as one of the running gags of that character is that he can look like anything and you can only spot him by his costume colors. Sadly, the decision to concentrate only on the Superman stories means that we don’t get to see the “Whatever Happened To…?” backup stories that gave some closure to obscure characters. Some of these were small gems–I was especially affected by the sad yet stirring tale of the Crimson Avenger, who will remain in the Land of the Remembered. Overall, the writing quality is good to excellent, with art to match (with a couple of clunkers.) Worth looking into if one of your favorites got a team-up slot.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    The previous volume of this series showed the problem of the Pre-Crisis Superman team-up: most heroes come across as little more than sidekicks to the Man of Steel, who often doesn't seem to need the help. Volume Two has mostly fixed this problem, and even seemingly weaker heroes can hold their own with Superman (not always, though, since Robin seems a little superfluous). The end result here is seeing who DC thought was worth teaming up with Superman for this run that originally was printed in t The previous volume of this series showed the problem of the Pre-Crisis Superman team-up: most heroes come across as little more than sidekicks to the Man of Steel, who often doesn't seem to need the help. Volume Two has mostly fixed this problem, and even seemingly weaker heroes can hold their own with Superman (not always, though, since Robin seems a little superfluous). The end result here is seeing who DC thought was worth teaming up with Superman for this run that originally was printed in the early 80s. So, besides the standard Flash/Supergirl/Robin/Wonder Woman meetings, there is also Plastic Man, Metamorpho, the Global Guardians, two for Captain Marvel, the Spectre, and the (maybe) ghost of the Unknown Soldier. For the bigger treats, Silver Age artist Curt Swan drew a Legion of Superheroes team-up involving Mongul (who's first few appearances are reprinted in this book) and the Sun-Eater (which oddly shows Mongul maybe killing the Justice League...they never reappear in the story after the Sun-Eater blasts them), a team-up with the Supermen of Earths 1 and 2 with the heroic Alex Luthor of Earth 3 against their respective Luthors and Ultraman, and another Swan-drawn issue where Superman's team-up is with a it's-a-comic-book-don't-think-about-it-too-hard Clark Kent. One final oddity is another drawn by Swan: Superman and He-Man. DC currently has the Masters of the Universe license, so they could reprint this one, which for those familiar with He-Man's mythology might be a bit weird since it suggests everyone on Eternia has superstrength and talks like Marvel's Thor, among other differences to the early mythos of that toy-selling line.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jason Luna

    The great issues in this magazine really make up a lot of comparative advantage in comparison to some so-so ones. There are some really imaginative worlds that are created. Like how Superman and Shazam get caught up in each other's worlds, and eventually a bunny that dresses up like Captain Marvel gets involved. Or Plastic Man's city, which is predicated on goofy sound effects and cartoon characters. This book mainly has solidly written smart dialogue and action, likable characterization, and sol The great issues in this magazine really make up a lot of comparative advantage in comparison to some so-so ones. There are some really imaginative worlds that are created. Like how Superman and Shazam get caught up in each other's worlds, and eventually a bunny that dresses up like Captain Marvel gets involved. Or Plastic Man's city, which is predicated on goofy sound effects and cartoon characters. This book mainly has solidly written smart dialogue and action, likable characterization, and solid artwork by vintage stalwarts Rich Buckler, Jim Starlin (both the best artists), and older types Curt Swan and Kurt Schaffenberger. What results is the stories are engrossing and read very quickly with anticipation. It may seem a little cheesy (but it is a comic book after all), but they do a good job of raising issues of basic humanity, and from a more nerdy angle, how Superman and other good guys can overcome seemingly impossible odds. The artwork/plots by Jim Starlin and Rich Buckler's artwork, not to mention Roy Thomas' writing (especially on Captain Marvel), as well as a generally fun mix of heroes for Superman to team up with. 5/5

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

    Very delighted to discover a Superman/Legion Curt Swan story. One I never knew about. Sold gold! Worth the price just for it. Otherwise a mixed bag to above par 80's material. Also surprised with the Jim Starlin chapters. Very enjoyable.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    A mixed bag, for sure, but a largely fun one. The Len Wein and Marv Wolfman-written chapters are the high points

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hektor Vokshi

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sticks Phillips

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Higgins

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yosef Shapiro

  18. 4 out of 5

    Neil Fisher

  19. 5 out of 5

    Richard Gombert

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

  21. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl Proc

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fletch

  23. 4 out of 5

    Les Gehman

  24. 4 out of 5

    Simon

  25. 5 out of 5

    Martin Maenza

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ralph

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  28. 4 out of 5

    John Desmarais

  29. 4 out of 5

    Corey

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike Rhodes

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