counter create hit Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State

Availability: Ready to download

In this sweeping narrative history from the Great Depression of the 1930s to the Great Recession of today, Caring for America rethinks both the history of the American welfare state from the perspective of care work and chronicles how home care workers eventually became one of the most vibrant forces in the American labor movement. Eileen Boris and Jennifer Klein demonstra In this sweeping narrative history from the Great Depression of the 1930s to the Great Recession of today, Caring for America rethinks both the history of the American welfare state from the perspective of care work and chronicles how home care workers eventually became one of the most vibrant forces in the American labor movement. Eileen Boris and Jennifer Klein demonstrate the ways in which law and social policy made home care a low-waged job that was stigmatized as welfare and relegated to the bottom of the medical hierarchy. For decades, these front-line caregivers labored in the shadows of a welfare state that shaped the conditions of the occupation. Disparate, often chaotic programs for home care, which allowed needy, elderly, and disabled people to avoid institutionalization, historically paid poverty wages to the African American and immigrant women who constituted the majority of the labor force. Yet policymakers and welfare administrators linked discourses of dependence and independence-claiming that such jobs would end clients' and workers' dependence on the state and provide a ticket to economic independence. The history of home care illuminates the fractured evolution of the modern American welfare state since the New Deal and its race, gender, and class fissures. It reveals why there is no adequate long-term care in America. Caring for America is much more than a history of social policy, however; it is also about a powerful contemporary social movement. At the front and center of the narrative are the workers-poor women of color-who have challenged the racial, social, and economic stigmas embedded in the system. Caring for America traces the intertwined, sometimes conflicting search of care providers and receivers for dignity, self-determination, and security. It highlights the senior citizen and independent living movements; the civil rights organizing of women on welfare and domestic workers; the battles of public sector unions; and the unionization of health and service workers. It rethinks the strategies of the U.S. labor movement in terms of a growing care work economy. Finally, it makes a powerful argument that care is a basic right for all and that care work merits a living wage.


Compare
Ads Banner

In this sweeping narrative history from the Great Depression of the 1930s to the Great Recession of today, Caring for America rethinks both the history of the American welfare state from the perspective of care work and chronicles how home care workers eventually became one of the most vibrant forces in the American labor movement. Eileen Boris and Jennifer Klein demonstra In this sweeping narrative history from the Great Depression of the 1930s to the Great Recession of today, Caring for America rethinks both the history of the American welfare state from the perspective of care work and chronicles how home care workers eventually became one of the most vibrant forces in the American labor movement. Eileen Boris and Jennifer Klein demonstrate the ways in which law and social policy made home care a low-waged job that was stigmatized as welfare and relegated to the bottom of the medical hierarchy. For decades, these front-line caregivers labored in the shadows of a welfare state that shaped the conditions of the occupation. Disparate, often chaotic programs for home care, which allowed needy, elderly, and disabled people to avoid institutionalization, historically paid poverty wages to the African American and immigrant women who constituted the majority of the labor force. Yet policymakers and welfare administrators linked discourses of dependence and independence-claiming that such jobs would end clients' and workers' dependence on the state and provide a ticket to economic independence. The history of home care illuminates the fractured evolution of the modern American welfare state since the New Deal and its race, gender, and class fissures. It reveals why there is no adequate long-term care in America. Caring for America is much more than a history of social policy, however; it is also about a powerful contemporary social movement. At the front and center of the narrative are the workers-poor women of color-who have challenged the racial, social, and economic stigmas embedded in the system. Caring for America traces the intertwined, sometimes conflicting search of care providers and receivers for dignity, self-determination, and security. It highlights the senior citizen and independent living movements; the civil rights organizing of women on welfare and domestic workers; the battles of public sector unions; and the unionization of health and service workers. It rethinks the strategies of the U.S. labor movement in terms of a growing care work economy. Finally, it makes a powerful argument that care is a basic right for all and that care work merits a living wage.

33 review for Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alex Cummings

    Brilliant, groundbreaking, and far-sighted book by two historians of labor who understand the stakes of the postindustrial economy in a time of profound economic and demographic change

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    Well researched, passionate, and carefully argued. How did we end up with the long term care for the elderly and disabled that we have and why haven't coalitions between the interest groups involved developed? My only wish was the Boris and Klein included more figures of the data and timelines they are discussing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zach

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam Ewing

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristyn Scorsone

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Dollar

  8. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

  9. 4 out of 5

    ashers

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Meter

  12. 4 out of 5

    Quin Rich

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael Strode

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Laura Harrison

  16. 4 out of 5

    NO

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mark Fitzpatrick

  18. 4 out of 5

    Prasanna

  19. 5 out of 5

    Todd Zimmer

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mpho3

  21. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Johnson

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rohith

  25. 4 out of 5

    Frances Krumholtz

  26. 5 out of 5

    bianca guerrero

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kai Wright

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kay

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sweetgrass

  31. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

  32. 4 out of 5

    Zee

  33. 4 out of 5

    William Erixon

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.