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When BIC, manufacturer of disposable ballpoint pens, wanted to grow, it looked for an idea beyond introducing new sizes and ink colors. Someone suggested lighters.   LIGHTERS?   With an idea that seemed crazy at first, that bright executive, instead of seeing BIC as a pen company—a business in the PEN “box”—figured out that there was growth to be found in the DISPOSABLE “bo When BIC, manufacturer of disposable ballpoint pens, wanted to grow, it looked for an idea beyond introducing new sizes and ink colors. Someone suggested lighters.   LIGHTERS?   With an idea that seemed crazy at first, that bright executive, instead of seeing BIC as a pen company—a business in the PEN “box”—figured out that there was growth to be found in the DISPOSABLE “box.” And he was right. Now there are disposable BIC lighters, razors, even phones. The company opened its door to a host of opportunities.   IT INVENTED A NEW BOX.   Your business can, too. And simply thinking “out of the box” is not the answer. True ingenuity needs structure, hard analysis, and bold brainstorming. It needs to start   THINKING IN NEW BOXES   —a revolutionary process for sustainable creativity from two strategic innovation experts from The Boston Consulting Group (BCG).   To make sense of the world, we all rely on assumptions, on models—on what Luc de Brabandere and Alan Iny call “boxes.” If we are unaware of our boxes, they can blind us to risks and opportunities.   This innovative book challenges everything you thought you knew about business creativity by breaking creativity down into five steps:   • Doubt everything. Challenge your current perspectives. • Probe the possible. Explore options around you. • Diverge. Generate many new and exciting ideas, even if they seem absurd. • Converge. Evaluate and select the ideas that will drive breakthrough results. • Reevaluate. Relentlessly. No idea is a good idea forever. And did we mention Reevaluate? Relentlessly.   Creativity is paramount if you are to thrive in a time of accelerating change. Replete with practical and potent creativity tools, and featuring fascinating case studies from BIC to Ford to Trader Joe’s, Thinking in New Boxes will help you and your company overcome missed opportunities and stay ahead of the curve.   This book isn’t a simpleminded checklist. This is Thinking in New Boxes.   And it will be fun. (We promise.)   Praise for Thinking in New Boxes   “Excellent . . . While focusing on business creativity, the principles in this book apply anywhere change is needed and will be of interest to anyone seeking to reinvent herself.”—Blogcritics “Thinking in New Boxes is a five-step guide that leverages the authors’ deep understanding of human nature to enable readers to overcome their limitations and both imagine and create their own futures. This book is a must-read for people living and working in today’s competitive environment.”—Ray O. Johnson, Ph.D., chief technology officer, Lockheed Martin   “Thinking In New Boxes discusses what I believe to be one of the fundamental shifts all companies/brands need to be thinking about: how to think creatively, in order to innovate and differentiate our brands. We need to thrive and lead in a world of accelerating change and this book challenges us to even greater creativity in our thinking. One of the best business books I’ve read in a long time.”—Jennifer Fox, CEO, Fairmont Hotels & Resorts   “As impressive as teaching new tricks to old dogs, Thinking in New Boxes is both inspirational and practical—a comprehensive,  step-by-step guide to sharpening one’s wits in order to harness creativity in the workplace.”—Peter Gelb, general manager, Metropolitan Opera


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When BIC, manufacturer of disposable ballpoint pens, wanted to grow, it looked for an idea beyond introducing new sizes and ink colors. Someone suggested lighters.   LIGHTERS?   With an idea that seemed crazy at first, that bright executive, instead of seeing BIC as a pen company—a business in the PEN “box”—figured out that there was growth to be found in the DISPOSABLE “bo When BIC, manufacturer of disposable ballpoint pens, wanted to grow, it looked for an idea beyond introducing new sizes and ink colors. Someone suggested lighters.   LIGHTERS?   With an idea that seemed crazy at first, that bright executive, instead of seeing BIC as a pen company—a business in the PEN “box”—figured out that there was growth to be found in the DISPOSABLE “box.” And he was right. Now there are disposable BIC lighters, razors, even phones. The company opened its door to a host of opportunities.   IT INVENTED A NEW BOX.   Your business can, too. And simply thinking “out of the box” is not the answer. True ingenuity needs structure, hard analysis, and bold brainstorming. It needs to start   THINKING IN NEW BOXES   —a revolutionary process for sustainable creativity from two strategic innovation experts from The Boston Consulting Group (BCG).   To make sense of the world, we all rely on assumptions, on models—on what Luc de Brabandere and Alan Iny call “boxes.” If we are unaware of our boxes, they can blind us to risks and opportunities.   This innovative book challenges everything you thought you knew about business creativity by breaking creativity down into five steps:   • Doubt everything. Challenge your current perspectives. • Probe the possible. Explore options around you. • Diverge. Generate many new and exciting ideas, even if they seem absurd. • Converge. Evaluate and select the ideas that will drive breakthrough results. • Reevaluate. Relentlessly. No idea is a good idea forever. And did we mention Reevaluate? Relentlessly.   Creativity is paramount if you are to thrive in a time of accelerating change. Replete with practical and potent creativity tools, and featuring fascinating case studies from BIC to Ford to Trader Joe’s, Thinking in New Boxes will help you and your company overcome missed opportunities and stay ahead of the curve.   This book isn’t a simpleminded checklist. This is Thinking in New Boxes.   And it will be fun. (We promise.)   Praise for Thinking in New Boxes   “Excellent . . . While focusing on business creativity, the principles in this book apply anywhere change is needed and will be of interest to anyone seeking to reinvent herself.”—Blogcritics “Thinking in New Boxes is a five-step guide that leverages the authors’ deep understanding of human nature to enable readers to overcome their limitations and both imagine and create their own futures. This book is a must-read for people living and working in today’s competitive environment.”—Ray O. Johnson, Ph.D., chief technology officer, Lockheed Martin   “Thinking In New Boxes discusses what I believe to be one of the fundamental shifts all companies/brands need to be thinking about: how to think creatively, in order to innovate and differentiate our brands. We need to thrive and lead in a world of accelerating change and this book challenges us to even greater creativity in our thinking. One of the best business books I’ve read in a long time.”—Jennifer Fox, CEO, Fairmont Hotels & Resorts   “As impressive as teaching new tricks to old dogs, Thinking in New Boxes is both inspirational and practical—a comprehensive,  step-by-step guide to sharpening one’s wits in order to harness creativity in the workplace.”—Peter Gelb, general manager, Metropolitan Opera

30 review for Thinking in New Boxes: A New Paradigm for Business Creativity

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jim Razinha

    In 2000, I was in grad school at Texas A&M and got an email from the XO of the Navy ROTC unit we were administratively attached to: "Your boss is in town tonight...might want to think about going." The "boss" he was referring to was Rear Admiral Lou Smith, Commander of Naval Facilities Engineering Command and Chief of the Civil Engineer Corps (CEC), who was talking that night at the local Society of American Military Engineers. So, my two CEC cohorts also in grad school and I uniformed up and we In 2000, I was in grad school at Texas A&M and got an email from the XO of the Navy ROTC unit we were administratively attached to: "Your boss is in town tonight...might want to think about going." The "boss" he was referring to was Rear Admiral Lou Smith, Commander of Naval Facilities Engineering Command and Chief of the Civil Engineer Corps (CEC), who was talking that night at the local Society of American Military Engineers. So, my two CEC cohorts also in grad school and I uniformed up and went. I'd been on the receiving end of many of RADM Smith's talks. He was a dynamic, engaging, funny Navy leader, and I'd heard most of what he was saying recently, so the brain was wandering trying to solve some Navier-Stokes thing when I heard him say, "...Thinking outside the box. I hate that phrase!" I sat up, thinking, "I like that phrase...why don't you like it?" Of course he read my mind, and continued, "Let me tell you why I hate it... I'm in DC sitting at a table with a bunch of admirals, and they're whining about not having enough funds and they don't know what to do to get more. I say, 'Let's go rob some banks!' For whatever reason some of them took me seriously and complained that we couldn't do that, to which I said, 'Why not? We have all the guns.' So you see," and he waggled a finger at the crowd, "there is a box!" That stuck with me, obviously, and when I came across this book, I thought "Finally! Someone gets it!" Except...Messrs. de Brabandere and Iny kind of didn't. Oh, they thought they did, uh...the book?, obviously, but ... A lot of time explaining our resistances to thinking in new boxes, from failure to categorize information correctly (the authors presume, of course, that there must be a "correct" way...) to so-called "Eureka" moments. They said Eureka moments can entail product or process innovations, like Apple's invention of the iPhone or Toyota's postwar development of its formidable, industry-challenging "lean" manufacturing strategies. Huh? They clearly do not understand "Eureka"... confusing it with "necessity" (Toyota - limited real estate for storing pseudo-infinite amounts of materials like the American manufacturers) and "how about this?" (Apple). Isaac Asimov said The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny...' (In case some fan thinks I'm being picky, the authors' examples throughout this book are just as off.) Anyway, here is their "powerful" five-step approach to thinking in new boxes: 1. Doubt Everything 2. Probe the Possible 3. Diverge 4. Converge 5. Reevaluate Relentlessly "Doubt Everything"??- WTH? Okay, the suggestion to question what you think you know makes great sense (and is nothing new). But to advocate doubting everything is plain absurd and a time waster - selectively doubt and question what needs it, but not everything. Worse than that, a primary example used to drive this home was Dick Fosbury's innovative high jump technique and the doubt that others had until he won gold. Interesting example, but flawed. Fosbury didn't doubt. Well, he did doubt that he could get any higher the traditional way. The authors say themselves in telling the story that Fosbury forced himself to experiment with different techniques. Its a stretch to confuse persistence with "doubting everything". The rest are just rehashes of the obvious, done elsewhere better. But as is to be expected, they do have few white board fodder strewed throughout. Here's the bottom line (my bottom line...not quite what the authors are trying to sell): there is always a box...change up how you try to move from the one you're in to another...and never rely on one set of "powerful" tools...there's a big universe out there...keep looking.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    I received this book via the Goodreads First Reads program. I liked how this book showed that you should embrace the right ideas. It also shows that it's a wonderful idea to explore your surroundings - see what's out there that could inspire you. All in all, a great book! I received this book via the Goodreads First Reads program. I liked how this book showed that you should embrace the right ideas. It also shows that it's a wonderful idea to explore your surroundings - see what's out there that could inspire you. All in all, a great book!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Akanksha Bajaj

    If you are a small business owner or an established entrepreneur who is in search of a new business idea or in the wake of taking the next business leap, 'Thinking in New Boxes' is the perfect resource to start. Being a small business owner myself, I have been straddling with utter confusion regarding my business' strategic vision and blindly trying to work out ideas over the years. Time just passed by and nothing worked out. I simply clung to my inner biases, my own representation of reality an If you are a small business owner or an established entrepreneur who is in search of a new business idea or in the wake of taking the next business leap, 'Thinking in New Boxes' is the perfect resource to start. Being a small business owner myself, I have been straddling with utter confusion regarding my business' strategic vision and blindly trying to work out ideas over the years. Time just passed by and nothing worked out. I simply clung to my inner biases, my own representation of reality and that kinda restricted me from leaving my comfort zone. "Thinking in New Boxes" just hits you at the right point and apprises you with the very idea of how you get imprisoned by your own conceptions of reality and how challenging it gets to think creatively about newer dimensions. It lays down a five-step approach that makes you escape the bondage created by your perceptions and reflect on those areas that you have been overlooking. The five step approach begins with the very practice of doubting everything you do; then drifting towards exploring three major aspects namely consumer insights, competitive intelligence and mega-trends; next brainstorming a diverse range of ideas by incorporating a creative approach; then heading towards filtering the ideas that are plausible to implement; and finally adopting the practice of re-evaluating your ideas relentlessly. Moreover, the book has a set of note-worthy examples and interesting exercises to understand each and every step of the framework. Just one caveat before you start reading the book: do not get overwhelmed while practicing the underlying concepts of the framework in question. It usually happens that in the wake of practicing the framework, you think way too much and land yourself up in a state of ambiguity. "Thinking in New Boxes: A New Paradigm for Business Creativity" is a must read for every established entrepreneur, small business owner and corporate strategist who wants to give a new dimension to his strategic vision and skills.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Juan Castro

    Mental models or Boxes enable us to process and make sense of our complex reality. Revolutionary ideas come in new boxes. If you don't update and change your regular boxes, you run the risk of suffering tunnel vision hurting your creative thinking. Overcome the problem with 3 steps: -Step 1: Don't trust your gut feeling. Sticking with the familiar will always feel right. So embrace the uncomfortable. Bypass your cognitive bias (subconscious programming). Doubt your worldview constantly. -Step 2: Arm Mental models or Boxes enable us to process and make sense of our complex reality. Revolutionary ideas come in new boxes. If you don't update and change your regular boxes, you run the risk of suffering tunnel vision hurting your creative thinking. Overcome the problem with 3 steps: -Step 1: Don't trust your gut feeling. Sticking with the familiar will always feel right. So embrace the uncomfortable. Bypass your cognitive bias (subconscious programming). Doubt your worldview constantly. -Step 2: Arm yourself with fresh input. Gather info to remove the blinders from your old boxes. Challenge reality and tap the wall you think is there. -Step 3: Generate and test hypotheses. Don't discard ideas before they have a chance to develop. Don't decide on intuition, be more scientific about this. Maybe you'll have to iterate. The bigger the box, the bigger the opportunities you'll find. Shift your perception and think wide definitions that contain other sub-boxes. Plan for an uncertain future. Gain the ability to change boxes in real time. (predictive thinking vs prospective thinking) Dare to err! Don't be afraid to make mistakes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gustavo Lichtenberger

    Good link to strategy and innovation This book provides a well structured method to think about thinking. There are several good suggestions and it reminds readers to keep their biases in check.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    While there are truly some great concepts that will make you rethink your everyday habits in the office world, 50% of the content is extremely repetitive. Definitely a something that's best read when you're feeling particularly inspired, otherwise I'd recommend skimming through it. While there are truly some great concepts that will make you rethink your everyday habits in the office world, 50% of the content is extremely repetitive. Definitely a something that's best read when you're feeling particularly inspired, otherwise I'd recommend skimming through it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Arie

    I wanted to like this book. Regarding the theory, I enjoyed it. But, I found the anecdotes too long and too many. I also found too much of the book to be unoriginal. Maybe that's because I've read too many from this genre? I wanted to like this book. Regarding the theory, I enjoyed it. But, I found the anecdotes too long and too many. I also found too much of the book to be unoriginal. Maybe that's because I've read too many from this genre?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Franck Vinchon

    Enlarging your boxes I thought I knew a lot about workshops, Innovation and methodologies. I was never surprised in this book but the way it’s brought to you is really pushing you to continue to enlarge endlessly your boxes. Motivating

  9. 5 out of 5

    Keith Budzynski

    How many ways can “new boxes” be used for another term.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    It wasn't that new, but it was worth reading. It wasn't that new, but it was worth reading.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Very long read, could have been much more concise

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Your company makes buggy whips. It has always made buggy whips. Sales have been flat for the past several quarters. As CEO, what, if anything, are you going to do about it? First of all, doubt everything about your company (but not to the point of paralysis). Put everything about your company, and your view of the market, under the microscope. Don't assume that anything about your company will stay the same in the future. Next, you need to look around and consider your options. It's normal to kee Your company makes buggy whips. It has always made buggy whips. Sales have been flat for the past several quarters. As CEO, what, if anything, are you going to do about it? First of all, doubt everything about your company (but not to the point of paralysis). Put everything about your company, and your view of the market, under the microscope. Don't assume that anything about your company will stay the same in the future. Next, you need to look around and consider your options. It's normal to keep your minds in the box labeled "buggy whips" (thinking that the only allowable options are those that involve buggy whips). Get that thought out of your head right now. Set up an off-site meeting of at least half a day with your senior management, or your entire company, if it is small enough, to brainstorm ideas for the future of your company. As a bit of mental exercise, describe your company's product without using the five most obvious words. Quantity of ideas is more important than quality. Do not denigrate any idea, no matter how strange it sounds. With a little tweaking, what sounds like a terrible idea could become your company's economic lifesaver. A later session, preferably with a different group of people, is dedicated to converging those many ideas into something more manageable. Now you can cross out the ideas that are just not feasible for your company, and combine similar ideas. Get down to a small number (three or four) new ideas or concepts or potential new products that your company can put into practice; then, do it. No idea will work forever, so constantly re-evaluate your new ideas, and don't be afraid to replace an old idea with a new one. This may seem like a rather dry and boring concept, but the authors do a very good job at making it not so dry and boring. It's interesting, and it has a lot to say to companies of any size.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shilpa

    For years we have been told, “Think outside the box”. According to Luc De Brabandere and Alan Iny, strategic consultants at The Boston Consulting Group, there is one fundamental flaw in thinking in this manner: It is difficult! So, in their new book Thinking In New Boxes, the duo teach you five essential steps to spark the next big idea. “You can’t even think without boxes, so don’t even try.” You need to use a range of existing mental models to simplify things. Your mind relies on pre-existing For years we have been told, “Think outside the box”. According to Luc De Brabandere and Alan Iny, strategic consultants at The Boston Consulting Group, there is one fundamental flaw in thinking in this manner: It is difficult! So, in their new book Thinking In New Boxes, the duo teach you five essential steps to spark the next big idea. “You can’t even think without boxes, so don’t even try.” You need to use a range of existing mental models to simplify things. Your mind relies on pre-existing categories that it has already created. (Consider that German psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer has argued extensively on how heuristics play a role in decision making). Brabandere and Iny suggest that boxes are sketches, your mind’s way of simplifying, naming, and framing things, so that you can determine how best to respond to them. But, thinking outside the box is not enough! There are three fundamental problems with Thinking Outside the box: 1. It is hard to get out of a box 2. It is tricky to determine which of your many boxes to think outside of 3. Even if you do manage the trick, and get out of a specific box, it often isn’t enough – you still need a new one. The challenge remains: how do you use boxes to generate new creative ideas and approaches? Thinking In New Boxes pushes us to challenge the existing paradigms and breaks down the process into 5 steps: continue reading: http://sukasareads.blogspot.ca/2013/1...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Thinking in New Boxes: A New Paradigm for Business Creativity' by Luc de Brabandere and Alan Iny is one of the better, more focused books I've read on business creativity. Instead of talking in broad, vague concepts, it gets to practical matters right away. The usual thinking for creativity is to think outside the box, but doing that is harder than it sounds. It's better to recognize the boxes that we find ourselves in. The constraints we assume or place on our businesses, and then find new boxe 'Thinking in New Boxes: A New Paradigm for Business Creativity' by Luc de Brabandere and Alan Iny is one of the better, more focused books I've read on business creativity. Instead of talking in broad, vague concepts, it gets to practical matters right away. The usual thinking for creativity is to think outside the box, but doing that is harder than it sounds. It's better to recognize the boxes that we find ourselves in. The constraints we assume or place on our businesses, and then find new boxes based on those. Techniques are all throughout the book and based on five techniques, such as diverge. The emphasis here is on more focused approaches than I've seen. While it is focused, there is room for blue sky thinking and "what if" scenario building, but in the context of current boxes. There are good examples throughout, and I liked the fictional video game company they used to guide through the process. By the end of the book, it shows how a company can truly transform. I enjoyed it. I was given a review copy of this ebook by Random House Publishing Group and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bruno

    This is a very refreshing "management" or "innovation" book, for two reasons: first it takes the "long" approach, and therefore avoids all the pitfalls of short-sighted marketing "ideas" or short-term incremental improvements. It asks specifically to instill doubt into one's thinking: what about if your company disappears in ten years, what if it gets 70% market share. How do you get there, what can happen? Secondly, it also offers a rational and thinking approach to thinking, especially to criti This is a very refreshing "management" or "innovation" book, for two reasons: first it takes the "long" approach, and therefore avoids all the pitfalls of short-sighted marketing "ideas" or short-term incremental improvements. It asks specifically to instill doubt into one's thinking: what about if your company disappears in ten years, what if it gets 70% market share. How do you get there, what can happen? Secondly, it also offers a rational and thinking approach to thinking, especially to critically evaluating one's "boxes". I already mentioned the "doubt", but it gets more philosophically (without becoming boring) by showing our biases, and how to come to ideas (or not). The book would have merited 5 stars but it loses 1 for being "too optimistic". It revers sometimes back to typical "management examples" where company X did something and it worked out fine. In line with the "doubt" mentioned above, where are those who failed in applying these lessons, or where it didn't work out. Whatever the reasons, because maybe there's the real lesson in applying this book ... Still, a book worth reading!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Ellwood

    In this book, the authors throw out the cliche of thinking outside the box and argue that we are always thinking in boxes but that we can choose what boxes we think in and can move from box to box to enhance our creative and problem solving skills. The authors also map out a process and use case studies to demonstrate how the process works.I particularly enjoyed their approach to using scenarios to help a business get out of its own way. I think this book is a must for business owners and busine In this book, the authors throw out the cliche of thinking outside the box and argue that we are always thinking in boxes but that we can choose what boxes we think in and can move from box to box to enhance our creative and problem solving skills. The authors also map out a process and use case studies to demonstrate how the process works.I particularly enjoyed their approach to using scenarios to help a business get out of its own way. I think this book is a must for business owners and business consultants who help business owners. It provides some useful tools and a way of approach business problems that will help everyone get out of the boxes they've been in and start exploring new boxes, new approaches to running the business.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I absolutely agree with the premise of the book. People have so many companies. Just because things have always been thought of in one way, doesn't mean that it is the right way, the best way or the only way. Sticking to old ways of thinking is the death of progress. Rethink everything. Everything. I did find the book to be more of a "how-to" rather than an overarching book of insights. If you are like looking to redefine a business or an approach, I encourage you not to take the box you are in at I absolutely agree with the premise of the book. People have so many companies. Just because things have always been thought of in one way, doesn't mean that it is the right way, the best way or the only way. Sticking to old ways of thinking is the death of progress. Rethink everything. Everything. I did find the book to be more of a "how-to" rather than an overarching book of insights. If you are like looking to redefine a business or an approach, I encourage you not to take the box you are in at face value.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Luke Thompson

    This book breaks down creativity into five steps: 1. Doubt everything. Challenge current perspectives. 2. Probe the possible. Explore all options. 3. Diverge. Generate as many new ideas as you can, even if they seem crazy. 4. Converge. Evaluate & select the ideas that will drive results. 5. Reevaluate . Relentlessly. Great case study about BIC pens --> lighters --> razors: re-framed themselves from pen company to a disposable product company

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie Rodemich

    I won the book in a goodreads giveaway and if I hadn't I probably wouldn't have gotten the chance to read it. Reading , Thinking in New Boxes was both inspirational and practical. It was comprehensive, step-by-step guide to sharpening one’s wits in order to harness creativity in the workplace. Definitely a book I recommend!! I won the book in a goodreads giveaway and if I hadn't I probably wouldn't have gotten the chance to read it. Reading , Thinking in New Boxes was both inspirational and practical. It was comprehensive, step-by-step guide to sharpening one’s wits in order to harness creativity in the workplace. Definitely a book I recommend!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenine

    This book is amazing, It went in depth explanation of how to approach your problems, opportunities and people around you. It is not just a great business book but a book to guide your decisions in life overall. The facts supported the idea quite well and an easy read. This a pure gem, every person's must read. LOVED it!! This book is amazing, It went in depth explanation of how to approach your problems, opportunities and people around you. It is not just a great business book but a book to guide your decisions in life overall. The facts supported the idea quite well and an easy read. This a pure gem, every person's must read. LOVED it!!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Very insightful book that forces a reader (or a listener ;-) ) to start thinking… differently. The main premise of the book is an idea that human thinking is compartmentalized, but to start thinking differently, we need not to “get out of the box,” but rather define different boxes where the new concepts can find home.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alex Devero

    It’s exceedingly difficult to see beyond our own limited perspective. But we’ll have to if we want to think creatively. To stimulate creative thinking, we must constantly challenge our worldview – the “boxes” that encapsulate what we believe to be possible – and apply methods that keep our subconscious from sabotaging us.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ariadna73

    Very good and super-interesting description of the five steps to be more creative and think in ways you never have thought before. Is a very interesting books for black belts and leaders, because it gives plenty of ideas for brain activities and development exercises.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    Fascinating look at how to re-think your company, what it really does, what it could be doing and how to re-energize all of that. Details of how to do this but also plenty of real and made up examples.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lamsouth

    some nice thoughts about new ways of thinking but not all that practical for selling purposes.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Julien Steel

    Great book on innovation and creativity.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Bobin

    A step by step process to help you and your organization think in new ways. We all think in boxes and learning to stretch, move outside and enter new ones is critical.

  28. 4 out of 5

    James

    Enjoyed the company fables and the convergence / divergence processes for creativity.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Visionlee Browning

    :) I won this book . Excited to start reading it when ever it comes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tosin Toshine

    excellent resource for strategic planning in any setting. highly recommended.

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