counter create hit The Puppet Boy Of Warsaw - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Puppet Boy Of Warsaw

Availability: Ready to download

THE PUPPET BOY OF WARSAW is the story of Mika, a Jewish boy who inherits a coat from his grandfather and discovers a puppet in one of its many secret pockets. He becomes a puppeteer in the Warsaw ghetto, but when his talent is discovered, Mika is forced to entertain the occupying German troops instead of his countrymen. It is also the story of Max, a German soldier statione THE PUPPET BOY OF WARSAW is the story of Mika, a Jewish boy who inherits a coat from his grandfather and discovers a puppet in one of its many secret pockets. He becomes a puppeteer in the Warsaw ghetto, but when his talent is discovered, Mika is forced to entertain the occupying German troops instead of his countrymen. It is also the story of Max, a German soldier stationed in Warsaw, whose experiences in Poland and later in Siberia's Gulag show a different side to the Second World War. As one of Mika's puppets is passed to the soldier, a war-torn legacy is handed from one generation to another.


Compare
Ads Banner

THE PUPPET BOY OF WARSAW is the story of Mika, a Jewish boy who inherits a coat from his grandfather and discovers a puppet in one of its many secret pockets. He becomes a puppeteer in the Warsaw ghetto, but when his talent is discovered, Mika is forced to entertain the occupying German troops instead of his countrymen. It is also the story of Max, a German soldier statione THE PUPPET BOY OF WARSAW is the story of Mika, a Jewish boy who inherits a coat from his grandfather and discovers a puppet in one of its many secret pockets. He becomes a puppeteer in the Warsaw ghetto, but when his talent is discovered, Mika is forced to entertain the occupying German troops instead of his countrymen. It is also the story of Max, a German soldier stationed in Warsaw, whose experiences in Poland and later in Siberia's Gulag show a different side to the Second World War. As one of Mika's puppets is passed to the soldier, a war-torn legacy is handed from one generation to another.

30 review for The Puppet Boy Of Warsaw

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steven Godin

    A book and Author I knew nothing about beforehand, other than it's Warsaw setting during WW2, a subject I am deeply passionate about, this novel though left me with mixed feelings. It's a warming tale and written with the full intentions of pulling at the heartstrings, which it does, but that depends on how much over-sentimentality you can take. It's one of my pet hates, and this does the cross the line from the mid-way point, but as this deals with the horrendous suffering of the Jews and the a A book and Author I knew nothing about beforehand, other than it's Warsaw setting during WW2, a subject I am deeply passionate about, this novel though left me with mixed feelings. It's a warming tale and written with the full intentions of pulling at the heartstrings, which it does, but that depends on how much over-sentimentality you can take. It's one of my pet hates, and this does the cross the line from the mid-way point, but as this deals with the horrendous suffering of the Jews and the aftermath of war, it's understandable why Weaver goes in this direction following the events during the holocaust, giving the Novel a softer tone like that of an exaggerated weepy movie. The story starts off in Modern day New York, as an ageing Jewish man, Mika, and grandson, Danny, are out walking when he notices a poster advertising 'The Puppet Boy of Warsaw', this stirs something deep within him, and on returning home he tells Danny a remarkable story of his time as a boy spent in the Warsaw Ghettos during the Second World War, in which after the loss of his Grandfather, he inherits his huge coat. It's full of many pockets, with secret pockets within the pockets, to hide precious personal items from the Nazis. Mika finds a puppet in one of the pockets, and after entering his grandfathers workshop he discovers many others, and decides in his honour to put on Puppet shows as a way to give hope and a ray of sunshine to the small children at a nearby Orphanage. Word gets around, and many others are drawn to Mika and his puppets as a show of defiance during the darkest days of their lives. The problem being the SS (or rats as they are called here) get involved, and Mika is forced to put on shows for other SS officers on the German side of the gates, by Max an SS member. After a trust is built between Mika and Max, he uses this to his advantage by smuggling small children to safety by hiding them inside his coat, unbelievable?, probably so, but it works. As war intensifies, with the Russians forcing their way west, Mika gives Max one of his puppets 'The Price', before both part ways, as the Third Reich starts to crumble. The second half of the novel was a disappointment, like Weaver had her finger on the fast-forward button. The early pacing worked beautifully, giving such finer details to the story, you are pulled into Mika's world, and really feel for him. But then the story starts to rush, suddenly writing of 'as the years pass on by'. Max is sent to the Gulag in Siberia, before escaping, travels for three years to get back to his wife and son in Germany. Before you now it, his son is grown up with a child of his own. Years later, Max gives his granddaughter his old puppet, telling of it's origins and Mika. All this seems to happen in hardly any time at all, giving little to character development, it was difficult to keep up. Before it goes for the emotional Hollywood ending as Mika lies in a hospital bed. I have read a lot of WW2 fiction/ non-fiction better than this, just couldn't get my head around some of the things that take place here, and the pacing went from a comfortable walk to a sprint. But it was written with heart, and for fan's of 'All the Light We Cannot See' or 'The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas' it might be worth a read. I know it's only fiction, but it's semi-unrealistic and overly sentimental nature partially ruined it for me. A kind rather than solid 3/5. It's the season of good will after all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean Barrs

    “So, whenever you see an ordinary coat, think about what may linger in its folds, what memories might be hidden in its pockets. It might whisper to you at night. There are many more stories sewn into its sleeves and many treasures harboured in its seams. This book was almost excellent. The story itself is fantastic, but the problem is that the second half of the book was completely lacking the excellence of the first. It was like the second half of the story wasn’t finalised completely, and s “So, whenever you see an ordinary coat, think about what may linger in its folds, what memories might be hidden in its pockets. It might whisper to you at night. There are many more stories sewn into its sleeves and many treasures harboured in its seams. This book was almost excellent. The story itself is fantastic, but the problem is that the second half of the book was completely lacking the excellence of the first. It was like the second half of the story wasn’t finalised completely, and still needed to be edited and polished up. Perhaps the author had a deadline to contend with or perhaps her heart wasn’t in the writing of Max’s part of the story. But, either way, the result was a novel that was only half good, in terms of its actual writing. The story, however, made up for it. A source of inspiration I liked the way this book was structured; it could quite easily be made into a movie. The first part of it follows the childhood of Mika- The Puppet Boy. And he has such a sad tale to tell. He begins his journey as an innocent youth who likes nothing more than to make young children smile with his punch and Judy type shows. But, his time in Nazi occupied Poland changes him; he loses his innocence and becomes what he needs to be to survive. He has to become a man, and fast, for the horrors inflicted upon the Polish means only the determined will survive. It was a shame to see this happen because this boy needed to grow up naturally, and not by forced exposure to the horrors of the war. His character development is a sad experience, but written superbly. In addition to this, the novel portrays an important message; it suggests that amongst the evil of Nazi occupation, there is still good to be found in the hearts some of the German men. The soldiers weren’t all bad, obviously, some saw how bad their government’s regime was, but were powerless to do anything about it. The protagonist, Mika, represents half of this; he and his puppets bring joy to many an orphan; he is like a beacon of hope in which they draw a sense of inner strength and a will to endure. But, he is also a beacon for some of the Germans that have almost lost all sense of moral right. They see him and realise if a boy in a worse position that themselves can be brave, then so can they. Almost fantastic Indeed, later in the book the author also demonstrates the reluctance and guilt that some Nazi soldiers, undoubtedly, felt. Not all of them merely succumbed to a diffusion of responsibility and adopted the attitude that their orders were the right thing to follow. Max, who really was inspired by the puppet boy, came to develop a really heavy heart, as he dwelt on his regret for his inaction. This becomes the second half of the story, and it was a shame that it took Max so long to realise his weakness; it is only when he is in a Russian prison does he come to fully understand how the Polish Jews must have felt. The courage of the Puppet boy allowed him to develop the will to survive. He realises what his inaction inflicted upon Mika. But, he only realises this when he comes to see the world through the eyes of the oppressed. This revelation changes his world, as he undergoes a sense of moral regeneration. But, he could never be the same man again nor could he be happy. This is where the poor writing comes through; I feel some details were omitted from Max’s story. Some of it was rushed over and never fully explained. It takes him three years to get home, but his journey is summed up in a few pages. I think this deserved at least a few chapters to show how he survived for such a long time in the wilderness, and how his courage was, again, fortified. This book has such an excellent story; the idea behind the coat and the puppets was very strong. But, what it needed was, was a good editor. With just a few changes, and a little bit of more time spent on it, this book could have quite easily have been something quite great; this could have been something special. Its three quarters of the way there, but not quite complete. The dialogue needed more work, overall, as did the second part of it. My rating of the novel is still quite high, all things considered, so it demonstrates how close this was to being what I consider to be a fantastic novel. The standard of the writing just let it down. A deserved five stars An almost excellent four stars

  3. 5 out of 5

    Diannah

    The World War II story is narrated by an elderly Jewish man, Mika, recalling his time in the Warsaw ghetto. Mika meets Max, a German soldier, and gives Max his favourite puppet the 'Prince', binding the men, forever. Max narrates the second part of the novel describing his journey to and escaping a Siberian gulag. The puppets bear witness to the hardships Mika and Max endure and bring joy and entertainment to their harsh realities. The third part of the novel has Max's grand-daughter, and her pu The World War II story is narrated by an elderly Jewish man, Mika, recalling his time in the Warsaw ghetto. Mika meets Max, a German soldier, and gives Max his favourite puppet the 'Prince', binding the men, forever. Max narrates the second part of the novel describing his journey to and escaping a Siberian gulag. The puppets bear witness to the hardships Mika and Max endure and bring joy and entertainment to their harsh realities. The third part of the novel has Max's grand-daughter, and her puppet troupe, in present day New York searching for Mika. The puppets are the most interesting narrative device in this story that describes the well-known horrors of the Nazi occupation of Poland. I don't doubt this book will find a large audience. However, it is not a well-written book; the dialogue is stilted and unnatural, there are problems with the pacing and the sequencing of time frames. The novel would have worked better if the authorial voice was not so didactic and employed subtler devices to show not tell, how war affects and changes lives.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Wow . This book is powerful. So much more than another holocaust book it chronicles lives both during and afterwards linked to the puppets. Its a very sad story but wonderfully told and so well written. Its a book about human tragedy but with moments of wonder and kindness. Highly recommended

  5. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    One of the best books chronicling the horrors of WW2 that I have ever read. The dialogue is a little stilted and doesn't flow great at times, especially towards the end of the book. Wonderful characters. This book will make you smile and cry, it will really make you feel. One of the things I appreciated most was that it showed that many Nazi soldiers were just men, eaten up by the machine is war. No fingers are pointed here, this is just war and what it does to people. Have yet to see Russians p One of the best books chronicling the horrors of WW2 that I have ever read. The dialogue is a little stilted and doesn't flow great at times, especially towards the end of the book. Wonderful characters. This book will make you smile and cry, it will really make you feel. One of the things I appreciated most was that it showed that many Nazi soldiers were just men, eaten up by the machine is war. No fingers are pointed here, this is just war and what it does to people. Have yet to see Russians painted in a human light...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    My love of WW2 is greatly known, so when an ARC came into work and the magic key words were spoken my friend nabbed it and put it aside for me. And what a tale it was! Holed up in Warsaw ghetto, a young Jewish lad with an incredible talent for puppetry and an old coat capable of holding a great many secrets tell a wondrous tale of courage, determination and above all, hope. It really gets down into the nitty gritty of living in such conditions with little to no access to food, hygiene, medicines My love of WW2 is greatly known, so when an ARC came into work and the magic key words were spoken my friend nabbed it and put it aside for me. And what a tale it was! Holed up in Warsaw ghetto, a young Jewish lad with an incredible talent for puppetry and an old coat capable of holding a great many secrets tell a wondrous tale of courage, determination and above all, hope. It really gets down into the nitty gritty of living in such conditions with little to no access to food, hygiene, medicines, freedom, and all the things we take for granted today. What people were prepared to do, both as brave Jewish smugglers trying to survive or German soldiers under strict orders (or Jewish informants, or German saviors) never fails to capture me and this really was no different. I especially liked the switch of point of view to Max as he does a bit of soul searching with his fellow German soldiers trying to come to terms with what they did during those horrible years. Responses ranged from "we only did what we were told" to feeling really quite guilty about it all, and I really feel like this would accurately represent the mindset of the Germans at that time. I was completely engrossed in this filthy and downtrodden world, cringing at every injustice and anxious to leave the company of the soldiers behind at every page. The puppetry did bring moments of lightness and despite all the horrible things that happen I did find it to be a encouraging story. Look out for it on the shelves this April.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    What to say of this book. It is so beautiful and so powerful. Every word, every character is so right and it feels so very real. It has every single emotion possible and the timing is perfect. I was happy when they were happy and I felt chills when they were grieving. For me to have have goosebumps or teary eyes while reading is rare and shows just how good this book is. Even better is that it must have taken great courage to write since the author herself is German and yet she made no excuses fo What to say of this book. It is so beautiful and so powerful. Every word, every character is so right and it feels so very real. It has every single emotion possible and the timing is perfect. I was happy when they were happy and I felt chills when they were grieving. For me to have have goosebumps or teary eyes while reading is rare and shows just how good this book is. Even better is that it must have taken great courage to write since the author herself is German and yet she made no excuses for the wrongs done by the Germans to the Jews, the Poles or anyone for that matter. That can't have been easy, but it speaks of great empathy which is one of the greatest tools for a writer.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Masanobu

    When I heard of The Puppet Boy of Warsaw I immediately added it to my wishlist. A novel about the Warsaw ghetto and a Gulag is a winning combination in my book, since Gulags aren't discussed as much as the Holocaust in literature. A novel which tells the story from the point of view of both factions is a rare gem, and it could have been the perfect way to explore the feelings of Germans regarding the Holocaust. Unfortunately, it was a disappointment. It started out great, with the childhood of Mi When I heard of The Puppet Boy of Warsaw I immediately added it to my wishlist. A novel about the Warsaw ghetto and a Gulag is a winning combination in my book, since Gulags aren't discussed as much as the Holocaust in literature. A novel which tells the story from the point of view of both factions is a rare gem, and it could have been the perfect way to explore the feelings of Germans regarding the Holocaust. Unfortunately, it was a disappointment. It started out great, with the childhood of Mika, the main character, but the author kept adding characters on top of characters, until it was obvious that the intended scope was too big for the meagre plot. From Mika's grandfather to Mika's grandson, and the muddled family history of a German soldier who was in the ghetto, The Puppet Boy of Warsaw spans six generations, four countries and roughly a century, in just 300 pages. While it could have worked in theory, it felt unfocused and all over the place. On the other hand, the novel is extremely well-reserached. I learned a lot about the Warsaw-Ghetto Uprising of 1943, and the author weaved Mika into the revolution seamlessly. However, that was the only high point of the whole novel for me. The Puppet Boy of Warsaw was excessively simplistic, and the author took on a didactic and moralising tone that felt awfully patronising. Readers don't want to be told that war is bad, they need to be shown so. This is a recurring theme in the novel - we are always told how wonderful a puppeteer Mika is, but we are never shown any of his performances. The sequence would go something like this: someone is sad and needs some cheering, Mika does his thing, everyone who watches is awed and feels fantastic all of a sudden. What exactly Mika said or did, nobody knows. After countless repetitions of this nonsense, I couldn't help but feel that the puppeteering, which could have been very innovative, was just a boring gimmick. The story had promise, but it fell short. Maybe in the hands of a more skilled author it could have been a good novel. And yet this will have a broad public, since it is one of those books that make you feel awful if you don't cry with its characters. I feel bad, because I really wanted to like this, but that was the last nail in the coffin. WWII was devastating enough as it was without the need to be emotionally manipulative with your readers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Karen McMillan

    This is a beautifully written book that is deeply moving. Set against the very real and difficult period of World War II at it’s very worst –the creation of the Jewish ghetto in Warsaw, through the deportations and to the bitter uprising of the last remaining Jews – it follows the story of Mika, a teenager who finds solace from the troubles in the puppets his grandfather left him along with a coat of many pockets. He becomes known as ‘The Puppet Boy’, bringing smiles to the children in the ghett This is a beautifully written book that is deeply moving. Set against the very real and difficult period of World War II at it’s very worst –the creation of the Jewish ghetto in Warsaw, through the deportations and to the bitter uprising of the last remaining Jews – it follows the story of Mika, a teenager who finds solace from the troubles in the puppets his grandfather left him along with a coat of many pockets. He becomes known as ‘The Puppet Boy’, bringing smiles to the children in the ghetto, but when Max, a German soldier, discovers him with puppets, things become very dangerous for Mika when he is forced to leave the ghetto to do weekly shows for the Germans who imprison them. The book is told in three parts – Mika’s story, then the story of German Max after the war, and then a very touching section in modern day that brings their two stories full circle. The author has clearly done a lot of research, and while Mika’s story is entirely fictional, it captures the sights, smells and sounds of the time with a real sense of authority. While many of the events are horrific, Mika’s world of puppets captures the ability of children to escape into a fantasy world, despite the reality of their lives – showing the power of puppets (or art, or music, or books) to lift people’s spirits and repair their souls. Mika is a wonderful character, scared but brave, loyal and caring – and Max, the German who ends up having so much impact on the course of war for Mika, is a complicated and sympathetic villain. I’d highly recommend this thought-provoking and original novel.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    I really enjoyed reading this book, it is a very gripping story, the sort you can't put down until the end is reached! Although the book does depict events of the holocaust, it is a more a story of human determination, courage and bravery. The book is mainly based around the life of one person, there are some sad moments, but it is also very thought provoking. Although the times depicted in the book are awful, I liked the way that the book showed how the people made the best of what they had an I really enjoyed reading this book, it is a very gripping story, the sort you can't put down until the end is reached! Although the book does depict events of the holocaust, it is a more a story of human determination, courage and bravery. The book is mainly based around the life of one person, there are some sad moments, but it is also very thought provoking. Although the times depicted in the book are awful, I liked the way that the book showed how the people made the best of what they had and went out of their way to bring joy to the lives of others. I would definitely recommend that you read this book, you won’t be disappointed!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carey

    What a powerful book that conjures such images of the horror but also the resilience of the human spirit. The two halves of the book gave great insight to both sides of the fence. It allows you to scrape the surface of the deep scars that the war left on people. I loved the magic the puppets provided and how they managed to weave the tale together. Whilst a work of fiction it salutes many of the true heroes of the war who did what they could to protect the vulnerable, smuggle children or fight i What a powerful book that conjures such images of the horror but also the resilience of the human spirit. The two halves of the book gave great insight to both sides of the fence. It allows you to scrape the surface of the deep scars that the war left on people. I loved the magic the puppets provided and how they managed to weave the tale together. Whilst a work of fiction it salutes many of the true heroes of the war who did what they could to protect the vulnerable, smuggle children or fight in the resistance. Highly recommended 4.5 stars.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    enjoyed this book but felt however the second part felt slightly rushed and didnt have the same intensity as the first when the book was actually in the warsaw ghetto

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I wasn't too sure about being given this book to read as I knew it would contain horrors of the 2nd World War, mistreatment of the Jews, Poles etc from a personal perspective. However the wonders of "the coat" and the puppets drew me in to appreciate the rest of that ghastly picture. The strength of the human soul under extreme hardship, family ties, how something small can become SO meaningful, what really matters in life! And there's more - an individual German soldier and the dreadful times he I wasn't too sure about being given this book to read as I knew it would contain horrors of the 2nd World War, mistreatment of the Jews, Poles etc from a personal perspective. However the wonders of "the coat" and the puppets drew me in to appreciate the rest of that ghastly picture. The strength of the human soul under extreme hardship, family ties, how something small can become SO meaningful, what really matters in life! And there's more - an individual German soldier and the dreadful times he endures after being to Siberia. The connection with the puppets - how under such dreadful conditions a powerful imagination can bring to life plays and stories that in turn bring to life ANY audience! Well written, 3 journeys - 2 families and the puppets, strong characters and a satisfying ending!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nigel

    Literally just finished it. A moving story of Jews in Warsaw in the war and a boy who finds his grandfathers puppets and plays with them. I loved the first part of the book which is Mika (the puppet boy) story. The second part didn't quite grab me the same way though was good (with echoes of Between Shades of Gray in). The blurb suggests that if you liked The Book Thief this would appeal and I think that is true. For me it doesn't quite have the power that Book Thief has but it is a good read. Literally just finished it. A moving story of Jews in Warsaw in the war and a boy who finds his grandfathers puppets and plays with them. I loved the first part of the book which is Mika (the puppet boy) story. The second part didn't quite grab me the same way though was good (with echoes of Between Shades of Gray in). The blurb suggests that if you liked The Book Thief this would appeal and I think that is true. For me it doesn't quite have the power that Book Thief has but it is a good read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Lensen

    I loved this book. A very original take on WW2 through real people from both sides. I felt the second part was a bit rushed, but that was more than compensated with the story

  16. 5 out of 5

    MFC

    Can't say too much ahead of book club - kept my interest - part one was excellent unfortunately the authour got tired for part two and was thinking of the movie version for part III.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Liezel Luneburg

    The Puppet Boy of Warsaw by Eva Weaver For various reasons, World War II novels do not count among my favourites. Maybe it’s because of the often graphic content, the haunting cries of human pain and suffering and the disquieting realisation that something just as horrible is constantly on the verge of happening. The Reader, The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, The Pianist and Sophie’s Choice are examples of disturbing Holocaust novels. Now and again a truly inspiring WWII story appears in print. The B The Puppet Boy of Warsaw by Eva Weaver For various reasons, World War II novels do not count among my favourites. Maybe it’s because of the often graphic content, the haunting cries of human pain and suffering and the disquieting realisation that something just as horrible is constantly on the verge of happening. The Reader, The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, The Pianist and Sophie’s Choice are examples of disturbing Holocaust novels. Now and again a truly inspiring WWII story appears in print. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak immediately comes to mind, but I’m sure that there are many more good examples. I have just finished The Puppet Boy of Warsaw – a WWII/Holocaust novel I reluctantly read on my mother’s insistence. And it took me by storm. I could not for the life of me put it down. The reader is not spared the monstrosities and the story of the initial stigmatising, gradual, growing oppression and the eventual genocide of the Jews, is told without using euphemisms. For this reason, it is not for the faint-hearted. Throughout the book the author succeeded in absorbing me into the desperate fight for survival. I could literally taste the fear and feel the hopelessness of the dire situation in which the Jews found themselves. But punishment and extreme suffering were not limited to them. After the war, many German soldiers previously stationed in Warsaw, were sent to Russian labour camps or the Gulag in Siberia. The book has many themes and facets. But the one thing I will always remember is the author’s very successful illustration of the fact that every single situation has many different viewpoints. This is accentuated, in my view, in two ways: Firstly different people’s stories and impressions are told and described by a puppet’s journey. The puppet stays the same, but the viewpoints change as the owner changes. Secondly Mika’s grandfather not only left him puppets, but also an interesting coat. It coat has many hidden pockets and is a treasure trove of secrets. The content depends on the pocket you “visit”. The puppets were made by Mika’s grandfather before the Jews were banned to the ghettos of Warsaw. After he was killed by German soldiers for no good reason, Mika inherited them and the Prince puppet became his best friend and partner. He cherished it and in return the Prince helped him to bring hope and fun to extremely desperate times. He regularly visited the most cramped corners of the ghetto, a children’s hospital and an orphanage to lift broken spirits with his puppet shows. But then a German soldier, Max, discovered his talent and he was forced to entertain bored soldiers once a week at their barracks. Later Max saved his mother and aunt from the dreaded Treblinka extermination camp. In return and out of gratitude, Mika gave his beloved Prince to the soldier. From then on the puppet accompanied him on his horrible journey to Siberia, became his only friend in the Russian Gulag and escaped with him back to his hometown, Nuremberg. The Prince later travelled with Max’s granddaughter to New York, where Mika then lived with his daughter and grandson. The roles of the puppets and the Prince in the lives of the two main characters are illustrated in the following quotes: Mika told his grandson: "Before I met your grandma, I still occasionally put on my old pocket coat, and in those first lonely weeks, the puppets gave me company - only they knew the full extent of my losses. Every so often I would take them out: the monkey and the crocodile, Hagazad and the fool. I didn’t touch the soldiers. I never wanted to see them again. I could never bring myself to play with the puppets again, only laid them out next to each other or held them in my lap - my sad little family’.” Just before Max died, he entrusted the Prince to his son, Karl, with the following words, “Karl, I want to give you this dear friend of mine. Please treat him well. He might not look like much, but he’s my companion, a witness to all my trials. This puppet has more life in him now than I do. Let him be a comfort to you and Mara.” The Puppet Boy of Warsaw by Eva Weaver is a well-written and inspiring novel, a must-read. A more complete discussion of the book can be found at http://bookkunkiesanonymous.blogspot....

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Parry

    Everyone should read This is a simple but well written story. The tale of a boy who grew up during the world's darkest moment. A story of man's inhumanity to man but also a story of hope. How do you carry on as the world around falls apart? What is there to live for when everything is taken away? In this story puppets give hope, courage and the power to survive. Amongst the darkest acts of man they bring laughter, joy and happiness. They allow an enemy to survive and return to his family. Finally Everyone should read This is a simple but well written story. The tale of a boy who grew up during the world's darkest moment. A story of man's inhumanity to man but also a story of hope. How do you carry on as the world around falls apart? What is there to live for when everything is taken away? In this story puppets give hope, courage and the power to survive. Amongst the darkest acts of man they bring laughter, joy and happiness. They allow an enemy to survive and return to his family. Finally they bring generations together. Thus such a powerful book that I read the last 100 pages with tears in my eyes and the falling down my face. Very few books do that.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Trev Hill

    I liked this book. Having translated work by a puppeteer who performed during the 1944 Warsaw Uprising (not the one portrayed in this book, the Ghetto Uprising) the story was more than plausible. Being a puppeteer myself, a lot of the aspects about puppetry also rang true. The first part of the book is by far the best part, not sparing the reader some of the harder details of the Ghetto (summary executions, starvation, disease etc). However,the second part, while less detailed, is necessarily red I liked this book. Having translated work by a puppeteer who performed during the 1944 Warsaw Uprising (not the one portrayed in this book, the Ghetto Uprising) the story was more than plausible. Being a puppeteer myself, a lot of the aspects about puppetry also rang true. The first part of the book is by far the best part, not sparing the reader some of the harder details of the Ghetto (summary executions, starvation, disease etc). However,the second part, while less detailed, is necessarily reduced to bring the story to its conclusion, years later. The book is important due to its attempt to address questions of later generations, especially young Germans and Jews, about the events of the past and the effects on their own lives. The author does not skate over how difficult this can be and how even attempts to address the past can be painful, even offensive to others. Having read some of the other reviews on this page, I found a lot of the criticisms about the actions of certain characters, historical details etc easily explained away. Questions have been raised about Mica's linguistic ability, being able to understand German; his grandfather is a university lecturer who, in Poland, was likely to have learned German (before 1918, Poland was divided between Germany, Austria and Russia). As well as this, Yiddish, which Mika probably speaks, is similar to German in many ways.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Charmaine Elliott

    Excellent. Loved the story embedded in history. Also the follow through. So insightful to present the Jewish and the German perspectives. So creative to focus on an object of value to both families. The only criticism I have is that I hated the simpering tone of the audible narrator in Part One of the book. Thank goodness for the man part in the second part! I was on the verge of giving up listening to the wheedling voice...Also loved The Eye of the Reindeer. An author to watch, for sure. Bravo! Excellent. Loved the story embedded in history. Also the follow through. So insightful to present the Jewish and the German perspectives. So creative to focus on an object of value to both families. The only criticism I have is that I hated the simpering tone of the audible narrator in Part One of the book. Thank goodness for the man part in the second part! I was on the verge of giving up listening to the wheedling voice...Also loved The Eye of the Reindeer. An author to watch, for sure. Bravo! Clearly loves the cold. Siberia, goodness...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Minette

    A fascinating and original holocaust story but told from a different angle. It's the story of Mika a teenage boy who is caught up in the Warsaw ghetto. He finds his own way to survive the horror of the ghetto. He uses puppets to keep up not only his spirits but also the spirits of those around him. It is also about his relationship with Max a German soldier who discovers him with puppets and makes him perform for the Germans. The Puppet boy of Warsaw is a beautifully written book set against the A fascinating and original holocaust story but told from a different angle. It's the story of Mika a teenage boy who is caught up in the Warsaw ghetto. He finds his own way to survive the horror of the ghetto. He uses puppets to keep up not only his spirits but also the spirits of those around him. It is also about his relationship with Max a German soldier who discovers him with puppets and makes him perform for the Germans. The Puppet boy of Warsaw is a beautifully written book set against the very real and difficult period of World War 2. 4 stars

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Kinsky

    This book deserves more than the maximum 5 stars! Written by the author in such a heart warming way, it could possibly be one of my favourite books for 2014 that I have read! It also shows that even some Nazi's had a heart and also depicts how one little boy can change the lives of so many! Highly recommended!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Meeker

    This book is a historical fiction and it is an easy read for young adults that are at a high reading level and also easy for adults. I recommend this book to people that like to read books about WWII history.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Elizabeth Edwards

    Humanity? What a wonderful read,so beautifully told Description of time place and people came Alive, to think that we can treat each other In such an inhuman way,I hope will make Us stop and think what we may perpetuate

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jane Smith

    This book was disappointing. The interesting story was, I felt, spoiled by the unsubtle handling of the literary device (the puppets) and the clumsy prose. The dialogue was unnatural and the abundance of cliches made me cringe - a shame, as the historical aspect of the story is so important.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Clair Dane

    A young boy inherits his grandfather 's puppets and is seen by a German officer!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cate

    An interesting story but not well-written - far too many cliches and too much "telling rather than showing". Her editors let her down!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Ross

    I enjoyed this deeply moving story, it was so well written - very thought provoking.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Although I loved the story, the way in which the book is written was a big let down. The first part was very detailed and I really felt for Mika, Ellie and all the others, but the way in which Mika’s story was told irritated me. Although the second half of the book read easier than the first part, it did seem rather rushed. I think I easily could have given this book 4 or 5 stars if it was written in a different way, as I did love the story but not the style.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Louise Burke

    Loved the tales of times past but thought the ending was too coincidental. Great how we see things from different points of view and develop sympathy for a most unexpected character.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.