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After spending several years in New York and California working in group homes for abused and emotionally disturbed children, author M. T. Johnson spent two and a half years living and traveling in Southeast Asia, where he wrote this, his first book, Newspaper Diapers. Newspaper Diapers is a work of fiction that tackles child abuse and group homes, a fascinating collection After spending several years in New York and California working in group homes for abused and emotionally disturbed children, author M. T. Johnson spent two and a half years living and traveling in Southeast Asia, where he wrote this, his first book, Newspaper Diapers. Newspaper Diapers is a work of fiction that tackles child abuse and group homes, a fascinating collection of short pieces expertly woven together by a few brilliant interconnected threads. The book is a disturbing and graphic look at what we do to ourselves and each other, a blurring of the line between abuser and victim, and a glimpse into certain minds and realities we'd rather not see. The author's brutally honest writing style deals with sex and abuse with a candor and bluntness in the tradition of Henry Rollins and Hubert Selby Jr. M. T. Johnson said of the book, “Statistics about child abuse seem to bring about little, if any, change; it's the individual stories that inspire action, that get under our skin and keep us up at night. Newspaper Diapers is dedicated to the amazing kids I worked with, some of whom have already passed away at the hands of murder or suicide. This is an earnest attempt at moving forward with my own life, and an attempt at portraying certain realities, no matter how harsh or ugly they might be--for it's only by acknowledging reality that we can move forward.”


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After spending several years in New York and California working in group homes for abused and emotionally disturbed children, author M. T. Johnson spent two and a half years living and traveling in Southeast Asia, where he wrote this, his first book, Newspaper Diapers. Newspaper Diapers is a work of fiction that tackles child abuse and group homes, a fascinating collection After spending several years in New York and California working in group homes for abused and emotionally disturbed children, author M. T. Johnson spent two and a half years living and traveling in Southeast Asia, where he wrote this, his first book, Newspaper Diapers. Newspaper Diapers is a work of fiction that tackles child abuse and group homes, a fascinating collection of short pieces expertly woven together by a few brilliant interconnected threads. The book is a disturbing and graphic look at what we do to ourselves and each other, a blurring of the line between abuser and victim, and a glimpse into certain minds and realities we'd rather not see. The author's brutally honest writing style deals with sex and abuse with a candor and bluntness in the tradition of Henry Rollins and Hubert Selby Jr. M. T. Johnson said of the book, “Statistics about child abuse seem to bring about little, if any, change; it's the individual stories that inspire action, that get under our skin and keep us up at night. Newspaper Diapers is dedicated to the amazing kids I worked with, some of whom have already passed away at the hands of murder or suicide. This is an earnest attempt at moving forward with my own life, and an attempt at portraying certain realities, no matter how harsh or ugly they might be--for it's only by acknowledging reality that we can move forward.”

30 review for Newspaper Diapers

  1. 4 out of 5

    John Rachel

    This unusually formatted glimpse into the world of adolescent psychosis induced by severe parental abuse was difficult for me to handle. I am certainly no stranger to the cruelties of the world, the insidious behavior too many humans are capable of, or the hardly surprising and highly monstrous distortions such aggression produces in young, vulnerable members of our society. On the other hand, having lived too many years in a country that glorifies violence, deifies its perpetrators, lionizes wa This unusually formatted glimpse into the world of adolescent psychosis induced by severe parental abuse was difficult for me to handle. I am certainly no stranger to the cruelties of the world, the insidious behavior too many humans are capable of, or the hardly surprising and highly monstrous distortions such aggression produces in young, vulnerable members of our society. On the other hand, having lived too many years in a country that glorifies violence, deifies its perpetrators, lionizes warriors and ruthless autocrats, embraces the destructive mechanisms of war, and ignores if not entirely mocks any hint that America can live at peace with the rest of the world, it hardly comes as a surprise. My only problem is that I don't need to be reminded of this. I am not sure I benefited at all by reading this book and certainly didn't learn anything. I enjoyed it the way a condemned man loves his executioner.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John

    A friend recommended Newspaper Diapers after reading my review of Hubert Selby Jr.'s Last Exit to Brooklyn. I can see why: they're both written in vignettes, contain many narrators, and tug at the heartstrings (or gag reflex). While I wouldn't put this collection of very short stories on the same caliber as my hero Hubert, it does provide an unforgettable, if brief, glimpse into the fragile psyches of the abused. Author M.T. Johnson has a knack for giving voice to the voiceless. Every vignette is A friend recommended Newspaper Diapers after reading my review of Hubert Selby Jr.'s Last Exit to Brooklyn. I can see why: they're both written in vignettes, contain many narrators, and tug at the heartstrings (or gag reflex). While I wouldn't put this collection of very short stories on the same caliber as my hero Hubert, it does provide an unforgettable, if brief, glimpse into the fragile psyches of the abused. Author M.T. Johnson has a knack for giving voice to the voiceless. Every vignette is a variation on the theme of child abuse. Surprisingly, each story seems as though it could have been penned by a different author, although some of the horrific themes begin to run together as the book progresses. Johnson has personal experience counseling abused kids, and one gets the feeling that his patients' words and lives are spilling out of his pen in these stories. In the book's opening pages, Johnson issues a standard 'This is a work of fiction' disclaimer. However, if we take the author at his word, the stories here must pale in comparison to the living hell that his kids actually went through. I can't imagine coming up with some of the perverse details in this book myself, let alone working with people who lived them. As such, prepare yourself for a serious degradation trip before you think about picking up Newspaper Diapers . The language is graphic (bordering on pornographic, in some fantasies), and the stories themselves don't pull any punches, either. I am often drawn to unsettling literature, but there were passages in this book that tested my limits of good taste. The thing that strikes me about Newspaper Diapers, and what ultimately makes it a worthwhile read, is the threadbare sense of hope that emerges throughout. The emotional mantle of this book is incontestable. While I found myself feeling alternatively depressed and angry while reading most of the stories, by the time I reached the book's conclusion, a subtle feeling of redemption began to surface. It's subtle, and easy to miss, but I think it's there, and it's the redeeming quality of these nightmares. To view these stories as nothing more than a laundry list of broken lives is to sell it short. For there is a faint--and inherently human--light that glimmers, even in a work as dark as this.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm2

    Newspaper Diapers is a not a book written to make you feel good , but rather to take you out of your comfort zone. It is dark, powerful, filled with sadness, tragedy, anger and intense emotion. The author forewarns us that the book is brutally honest, graphic and disturbing. Through the author's first hand experience working in group homes as well as the raw, intensely emotional style of writing, you are transported inside the mind of the speaker. The author takes you to the darkness of someone e Newspaper Diapers is a not a book written to make you feel good , but rather to take you out of your comfort zone. It is dark, powerful, filled with sadness, tragedy, anger and intense emotion. The author forewarns us that the book is brutally honest, graphic and disturbing. Through the author's first hand experience working in group homes as well as the raw, intensely emotional style of writing, you are transported inside the mind of the speaker. The author takes you to the darkness of someone else's hell and enables you to feel their anger and pain. Although a work of fiction, you feel that perhaps the author's reason for writing is to bring light to something so dark most of us can't even imagine it exists. The book is a collection of short well written pieces. A few of the pieces were not clear to me though as to where they were coming from. If you are able to keep an open mind as far as the language and the fact that the writing is graphic, Newspaper Diapers will transport you into someone else's reality no matter how ugly.It will give you cause to think. It will stay with you long after you have finished.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carol Waters

    This author catalogued the abuse of several kids, many kids, in this short little narrative. And although I would be irritated if he slapped on some panacea, some cure-all to "fix" the sufferers, he could have done a little more than let us be peeping Toms into their misery and pain. I remember meeting a kid who got mad at her dad and snitched about their sexual relationship. She was about 15 when it ended. She got moved to Foster, from home to home since teenagers just aren't all that charming, This author catalogued the abuse of several kids, many kids, in this short little narrative. And although I would be irritated if he slapped on some panacea, some cure-all to "fix" the sufferers, he could have done a little more than let us be peeping Toms into their misery and pain. I remember meeting a kid who got mad at her dad and snitched about their sexual relationship. She was about 15 when it ended. She got moved to Foster, from home to home since teenagers just aren't all that charming, and since wounds heal from the inside out and take a lot of time to do that, and when I met her at a residential program wanted permission to move back to dad, "Because I've been forced to have sex by the kids at every placement or with the son of the foster mom at that last place, and Dad at least loves me and is good in bed." Well. This was like looking at a book of mug shots of misery. The introspection at the end, where the writer realizes that he might have given hope with a hug, was just too little too late. It made us abusers too if we got off emotionally on the pain of those kids. Don't ever forget that. Don't just watch them suffer. Help, damn it. Help.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Guy Portman

    Newspaper Diapers consists of a series of loosely connected vignettes about child abuse and group homes being recounted by various perverse and narcissistic narrators. The line between abuser and victim is blurred in these traumatic accounts that entail self-harm, illicit sex and a youth obsessed with sniffing buttholes. These episodes, which provide insights into adolescent psychosis, are all the more harrowing for their candid prose and deadpan tone. M. T. Johnson is a skilled storyteller, who Newspaper Diapers consists of a series of loosely connected vignettes about child abuse and group homes being recounted by various perverse and narcissistic narrators. The line between abuser and victim is blurred in these traumatic accounts that entail self-harm, illicit sex and a youth obsessed with sniffing buttholes. These episodes, which provide insights into adolescent psychosis, are all the more harrowing for their candid prose and deadpan tone. M. T. Johnson is a skilled storyteller, who successfully elicits his audience’s anguish. What Newspaper Diapers lacks in length, it more than compensates for in disturbing content. The book left an indelible mark on this reader’s mind. Perhaps this transgressive work’s incoherent structure is a metaphor for the discombobulated minds of the characters that populate it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Connie Kuntz

    There is very little hope and relief in this sickening collection of essays by victims of sexual abuse. If you think you can handle it, you can't. At least I can't. These essays are horrifying. That said, maybe you should read this. Maybe you want to know more about the following: who is getting abused, what happens in a day in the life of child who is a victim of sexual abuse, what social workers and counselors have to go through to help improve the lives of abuse victims, why there is no need for There is very little hope and relief in this sickening collection of essays by victims of sexual abuse. If you think you can handle it, you can't. At least I can't. These essays are horrifying. That said, maybe you should read this. Maybe you want to know more about the following: who is getting abused, what happens in a day in the life of child who is a victim of sexual abuse, what social workers and counselors have to go through to help improve the lives of abuse victims, why there is no need for horror movies in this country because too many children are trapped in a horror-filled reality, how pitiful pornography, prostitution, drugs, and violence are, and when our society became so insensitive. I'm very upset by this, but I do recommend it. I recommend it because 50 Shades of Grey is considered a good book in this country and I think that's pitiful. I give this book four stars because it took a ton of courage to write and edit this collection. I would have given it five stars if the author didn't hide behind a cheap pen name. It is well-paced, neatly presented, and contains some interesting psychology. But that is IT in terms of happy reading moments. The rest are filled with the mind games, violence, sexual abuse, deep-seated anger, resentment, and everything else associated with the hell that is sexual abuse. This is a devastating reading experience. Signed, How Do You Give "Stars" to Something Like This?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    I didn't like this book. Let me be very clear in that I don't think anyone can claim to like this book. However, I think it is an important book. I think that people talk about abused children without really understanding the horrors that surround abuse. I spent a year between college and grad school trying to figure out what I wanted to be when I grew up and during that time I worked as a counselor at a state run facility for children who had been removed from their homes. The idea behind the fa I didn't like this book. Let me be very clear in that I don't think anyone can claim to like this book. However, I think it is an important book. I think that people talk about abused children without really understanding the horrors that surround abuse. I spent a year between college and grad school trying to figure out what I wanted to be when I grew up and during that time I worked as a counselor at a state run facility for children who had been removed from their homes. The idea behind the facility was that it was to provide a temporary place for kids to stay (a few days to a week at the most was ideal) before moving on to a foster home. I learned more in the 12 months that I worked there then I ever wanted to know about the ways in which the human mind can be damaged and can strike out. I learned how to physically restrain a child (defined on the first page of this book); I rarely passed a shift without having to physically restrain at least one of the children in my care. Johnson's fictional account is a very accurate portrayal of the effects of abuse. The vignettes are powerful in their simplicity and remarkable as a cohesive unit. This is an important view into the lives of children touched by abuse. For those who have never really met someone with emotional problems, this book is a must read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Newspaper Diapers is a book about the realities of people living and working inside group homes, realities the majority of the population will never experience for themselves. As stated by the author, statistics fail to capture the human side of what actually takes place within these homes, but this book, though a work of "fiction", does not hesitate to put strikingly realistic stories in front of the reader. Do these thing happen? Most certainly. Newspaper Diapers will be a book you will either Newspaper Diapers is a book about the realities of people living and working inside group homes, realities the majority of the population will never experience for themselves. As stated by the author, statistics fail to capture the human side of what actually takes place within these homes, but this book, though a work of "fiction", does not hesitate to put strikingly realistic stories in front of the reader. Do these thing happen? Most certainly. Newspaper Diapers will be a book you will either find fascinating or disturbing, but the realism and "in your face" style of writing leave the reader with a sense of longing to help, and an avenue to connect with the people described. This is not a typical "story" nor is there a stong character development. I'd fear that if there was more of a character connection created, the emotional toll of the book would be far greater. Though choppy, the book relays what was intended, a look behind the curtain.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike Noyes

    This isn't an easy book to read. It takes you to very dark and very personal places that most average people are lucky enough to ever have to think about. But the things in this book happen. And it's important to know that. You may not "enjoy" this book, but you really should read it. This isn't an easy book to read. It takes you to very dark and very personal places that most average people are lucky enough to ever have to think about. But the things in this book happen. And it's important to know that. You may not "enjoy" this book, but you really should read it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Wicks

    This book gave me an awareness of the horrors that some children are forced to endure at the hands of their abusers. Many of these individual stories were so disturbing that they were beyond my comprehension. The writer was able to make me feel, to a small degree, something of what the victims must have. When a book leaves me feeling an emotion and gives me something to think about is when I know I've enjoyed it. This book definitely left me feeling many different emotions. I loved the writer's This book gave me an awareness of the horrors that some children are forced to endure at the hands of their abusers. Many of these individual stories were so disturbing that they were beyond my comprehension. The writer was able to make me feel, to a small degree, something of what the victims must have. When a book leaves me feeling an emotion and gives me something to think about is when I know I've enjoyed it. This book definitely left me feeling many different emotions. I loved the writer's style as it was a smooth read which made me not want to put it down once I had begun. I would recommend reading this book if you are someone who is not afraid to go deep into yourself and who is willing to broaden your awareness on the issue of child abuse.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Denise MacDonald

    This book was like a collection of snipits from case files on children who have been abused or are abusers mixed in with the thoughts of the counselors who work with them. I think it was very real, raw and emotional. I think some people may be shocked if they read this, shocked at the abuse some people live through and shocked by the abuse counselors go through while trying to care for these children. I think this book should be read by anyone thinking about working in the field of youth counsel This book was like a collection of snipits from case files on children who have been abused or are abusers mixed in with the thoughts of the counselors who work with them. I think it was very real, raw and emotional. I think some people may be shocked if they read this, shocked at the abuse some people live through and shocked by the abuse counselors go through while trying to care for these children. I think this book should be read by anyone thinking about working in the field of youth counseling.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Liking this book is not exactly accurate. This is a collection of anecdotes of horrible things that humans have done to their children, and how terrible the effects are on the victims as well as others. It's a heartbreaking book, difficult to read. There are multiple trigger warnings, so this is definitely not for everyone. Liking this book is not exactly accurate. This is a collection of anecdotes of horrible things that humans have done to their children, and how terrible the effects are on the victims as well as others. It's a heartbreaking book, difficult to read. There are multiple trigger warnings, so this is definitely not for everyone.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alina Fabozzi

    Very sad, unfortunate book. It was a quick read, and the style of short stories were pretty interesting. I could've done without the anallingus sections, but maybe it was important! If you want to feel bad for a few days, read this book. Very sad, unfortunate book. It was a quick read, and the style of short stories were pretty interesting. I could've done without the anallingus sections, but maybe it was important! If you want to feel bad for a few days, read this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brad Mcqueen

    This was a messed up book. Extremely graphic and disturbing. Like a train wreck, you cannot look away. This book opened my eyes to the fact that there are some people in really bad shape due to child abuse. Mind Officially Blown.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Harry

    Wow! Powerful, thought provoking, gross, sad and some things were definitely recognizable from my own life. I had to read it twice to let it really settle in to my brain. It was also too short. Makes me wonder what kind of background the author has.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    While disturbing at times, it's very interesting and thoughtfully written. The only reason I deduct a star is because I don't know if I could read it multiple times. While disturbing at times, it's very interesting and thoughtfully written. The only reason I deduct a star is because I don't know if I could read it multiple times.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julie Abshire

    Eye opening and sad.

  18. 4 out of 5

    J213

    Wow. Damn.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mary Slowik

    Fragmentary. Mysterious. Frightening. Caps-lock BRUTALLY HONEST. Read at your own risk.

  20. 4 out of 5

    J.X.

    First off, this book does not have chapters or titles or an index or even a single connected story. There are recurring characters, but they aren't named and you'll have to pay attention to know which character is speaking or being spoken of (although it isn't strictly relevant). You won't really be able to appreciate it unless you understand and can deal with those things. It is also relentlessly dark, and it's especially effective because it's not exaggerated fictional darkness, in the sense of First off, this book does not have chapters or titles or an index or even a single connected story. There are recurring characters, but they aren't named and you'll have to pay attention to know which character is speaking or being spoken of (although it isn't strictly relevant). You won't really be able to appreciate it unless you understand and can deal with those things. It is also relentlessly dark, and it's especially effective because it's not exaggerated fictional darkness, in the sense of American Psycho or the like. The book does contain a disclaimer that it is fiction, but it's obvious that the stories themselves are based on truth. This book was recommended to me by a random goodreads user, so I was naturally skeptical. I was curious though because the format (collection of short mixed prose) and size (barely 100 pages) are similar to a project I'm working on, so I ordered it anyway. I don't regret the $8 purchase price. This is a strange and unique book that I'll enjoy having around. If you like dark subject matter and go into it with the right expectations, I think you will too.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This book grabbed my attention from the first page. It really gave a powerful and realistic view on abuse and the effects it has on its victims. The author has a way of making you feel both sympathy and rage for the characters in the book. I found myself emotional during parts, where you can't help but feel connected to the victims of horrific abuse. This book was definitely an eye-opener to the long term effects on people that are abused and the counselors that work with them. I think this is a This book grabbed my attention from the first page. It really gave a powerful and realistic view on abuse and the effects it has on its victims. The author has a way of making you feel both sympathy and rage for the characters in the book. I found myself emotional during parts, where you can't help but feel connected to the victims of horrific abuse. This book was definitely an eye-opener to the long term effects on people that are abused and the counselors that work with them. I think this is a very worthwhile read, you won't regret it!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jenica

    A friend recommended this book to me because I'm a fan of Chuck Palahniuk and Bret Easton Ellis, both of which have grotesque and disturbing writing styles. Indeed, this book is also disturbing in similar ways to Palahniuk and Ellis. What's depressing is that the author based the book on his experiences working in mental health. There is truth to the extreme abuse in these stories. The book intertwines short narratives of psychologically disturbed children in a group home with the narratives of A friend recommended this book to me because I'm a fan of Chuck Palahniuk and Bret Easton Ellis, both of which have grotesque and disturbing writing styles. Indeed, this book is also disturbing in similar ways to Palahniuk and Ellis. What's depressing is that the author based the book on his experiences working in mental health. There is truth to the extreme abuse in these stories. The book intertwines short narratives of psychologically disturbed children in a group home with the narratives of their abusers and their therapists. It is often hard to tell whether the story you are hearing is from a child, abuser or therapist. Everyone is, sadly, deeply disturbed. Even though I liked this book, something was missing. I'm not sure what that "something" was. I think a little more connectivity between the narratives would have helped put this over the edge to make it more amazing than just an interesting read. Perhaps whatever is missing is what lead to this book being so short. There is great material here to be sure, but I felt like it could have been used better.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eve Kay

    One of the children said (about their parents) exactly what I was thinking the whole time while reading: "you guys used us to make your lives better" These parents have some form of need for these children, it's all very selfish and self-centered. To them, it's not about the children at all. They only have some demand they need their children to fulfill. Whether it's sexual, a form of mentall illness, or that they're just aholes, I don't know if there really is a difference. Judging by what all th One of the children said (about their parents) exactly what I was thinking the whole time while reading: "you guys used us to make your lives better" These parents have some form of need for these children, it's all very selfish and self-centered. To them, it's not about the children at all. They only have some demand they need their children to fulfill. Whether it's sexual, a form of mentall illness, or that they're just aholes, I don't know if there really is a difference. Judging by what all the children and their counselors told about the effects and consequences, there is no difference. The results are the same: These children grow up twisted in one way or another. They either get physical damage, or mental, or both. Which ever it is, it doesn't matter because the root cause are the parents. Actually, I won't lecture anymore. I think this was a wonderful book and here is why: It very purely laid out what is the outcome of mistreating children. It was raw and that's how it should be.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Meaghan

    Not what I had been expecting. The stories didn't seem to have any real cohesive flow and I had been under the assumption that the information would center on a group of people or have more explanation for people. I was surprised by the constant switching of view point and would have found this to be much more poignant if more emphasis had been placed on the workings of the facilities or had a reflection on the children and adults themselves other than small snippets that simply provoked sympath Not what I had been expecting. The stories didn't seem to have any real cohesive flow and I had been under the assumption that the information would center on a group of people or have more explanation for people. I was surprised by the constant switching of view point and would have found this to be much more poignant if more emphasis had been placed on the workings of the facilities or had a reflection on the children and adults themselves other than small snippets that simply provoked sympathy that didn't gain anything more than that. Worth a read because it's short and can lead an individual to do more research in order to have a better understanding if the environment and perverse natures of humans as a whole.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Had some great expectations as I was recommended that book myself being a fervent reader of Hubert Selby Jr. A gathering of stories, comments and slices of lives shattered by abuse, low self-esteem, dysfunctional family matters - Stories written by patients and healers in a ward in a mental health treatment facility. A panoply of disturbing stories, depicting doomed lives from the beginning all of them not leading to a road where the lights shines on. The writing is average, crude (but ought to Had some great expectations as I was recommended that book myself being a fervent reader of Hubert Selby Jr. A gathering of stories, comments and slices of lives shattered by abuse, low self-esteem, dysfunctional family matters - Stories written by patients and healers in a ward in a mental health treatment facility. A panoply of disturbing stories, depicting doomed lives from the beginning all of them not leading to a road where the lights shines on. The writing is average, crude (but ought to be this way) and the events described are pretty much "normal" for a ward for the psychologically disturbed. Nothing new, really.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    I bought this book on a whim at the recommendation of another Goodreads member, on the basis that I needed to get outside my usual circle of authors. This is a strange book. It has a very very loose structure, it is more a collection of musings and jottings rather than a narrative journey. The subject matter (dysfunctional families and child abuse) is dark and disturbing at times - not for the faint hearted. The writing itself has some good passages. Worth an explore if you can stomach the subjec I bought this book on a whim at the recommendation of another Goodreads member, on the basis that I needed to get outside my usual circle of authors. This is a strange book. It has a very very loose structure, it is more a collection of musings and jottings rather than a narrative journey. The subject matter (dysfunctional families and child abuse) is dark and disturbing at times - not for the faint hearted. The writing itself has some good passages. Worth an explore if you can stomach the subject.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ursula Kelly

    Disturbing, sickening and horrific. When is the abuse of the innocent going to stop? Hell will be overflowing when Judgement Day comes......

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I have to admit I hated this book - it is a collection of essays (all fiction) which are written as if from the point of view of rape victims, abused children, those traumatized by either sexual or physical torment, etc. And the entries are rather graphic in nature. I will agree these are very realistic writings and do accurately reflect probably the midset of those unfortunate to have experienced these horrors. If one has the luck to have never been exposed to such atrocities, then this book wi I have to admit I hated this book - it is a collection of essays (all fiction) which are written as if from the point of view of rape victims, abused children, those traumatized by either sexual or physical torment, etc. And the entries are rather graphic in nature. I will agree these are very realistic writings and do accurately reflect probably the midset of those unfortunate to have experienced these horrors. If one has the luck to have never been exposed to such atrocities, then this book will be both utterly horrific and eye-opening. For what its worth, I have seen/interacted with individuals who have had such traumas in the context of my profession so I was not all that enamored to be reading about it in such graphic detail. I get enough of life's tragedies in my day job, I did not enjoy reading about it further on my down time. I can't even begin to think who would be interested in reading this work but apparently judging by all the high reviews on Goodreads, many are in fact not just interested, but praise the effort. To each their own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stevie

    Nice to read right before I start a new year at my small town public elementary school. You don't see much of this stuff there. I don't think my mind could handle it. Nice to read right before I start a new year at my small town public elementary school. You don't see much of this stuff there. I don't think my mind could handle it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melissa T

    * I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review* The GR rating system is completely inappropriate for this book. It was a good book, but given the subject matter, I would feel completely strange if I were to rate it 5 stars. But then I would also feel guilty if I rated it 1 star. The one star rating, is appropriate, given that I didn't like the content. But it's not because the book was poorly written, just that its distressing that there are these types of horrible things going * I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review* The GR rating system is completely inappropriate for this book. It was a good book, but given the subject matter, I would feel completely strange if I were to rate it 5 stars. But then I would also feel guilty if I rated it 1 star. The one star rating, is appropriate, given that I didn't like the content. But it's not because the book was poorly written, just that its distressing that there are these types of horrible things going on, that are eventually turned into books like these. This book is disturbing, and could be triggering for some people. It seems like a book of confessions to me, all written by the sufferers of this horrific abuse, but I have the feeling that these are just being related by the writer. This book is intense, and just, sad.

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