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Inside Transracial Adoption: Strength-based, Culture-sensitizing Parenting Strategies for Inter-country or Domestic Adoptive Families That Don't "Match", Second Edition

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Is transracial adoption a positive choice for kids? How can children gain their new families without losing their birth heritage? How can parents best support their children after placement? Inside Transracial Adoption is an authoritative guide to navigating the challenges and issues that parents face in the USA when they adopt a child of a different race and/or from a diff Is transracial adoption a positive choice for kids? How can children gain their new families without losing their birth heritage? How can parents best support their children after placement? Inside Transracial Adoption is an authoritative guide to navigating the challenges and issues that parents face in the USA when they adopt a child of a different race and/or from a different culture. Filled with real-life examples and strategies for success, this book explores in depth the realities of raising a child transracially, whether in a multicultural or a predominantly white community. Readers will learn how to help children adopted transracially or transnationally build a strong sense of identity, so that they will feel at home both in their new family and in their racial group or culture of origin. This second edition incorporates the latest research on positive racial identity and multicultural families, and reflects recent developments and trends in adoption. Drawing on research, decades of experience as adoption professionals, and their own personal experience of adopting transracially, Beth Hall and Gail Steinberg offer insights for all transracial adoptive parents - from prospective first-time adopters to experienced veterans - and those who support them.


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Is transracial adoption a positive choice for kids? How can children gain their new families without losing their birth heritage? How can parents best support their children after placement? Inside Transracial Adoption is an authoritative guide to navigating the challenges and issues that parents face in the USA when they adopt a child of a different race and/or from a diff Is transracial adoption a positive choice for kids? How can children gain their new families without losing their birth heritage? How can parents best support their children after placement? Inside Transracial Adoption is an authoritative guide to navigating the challenges and issues that parents face in the USA when they adopt a child of a different race and/or from a different culture. Filled with real-life examples and strategies for success, this book explores in depth the realities of raising a child transracially, whether in a multicultural or a predominantly white community. Readers will learn how to help children adopted transracially or transnationally build a strong sense of identity, so that they will feel at home both in their new family and in their racial group or culture of origin. This second edition incorporates the latest research on positive racial identity and multicultural families, and reflects recent developments and trends in adoption. Drawing on research, decades of experience as adoption professionals, and their own personal experience of adopting transracially, Beth Hall and Gail Steinberg offer insights for all transracial adoptive parents - from prospective first-time adopters to experienced veterans - and those who support them.

30 review for Inside Transracial Adoption: Strength-based, Culture-sensitizing Parenting Strategies for Inter-country or Domestic Adoptive Families That Don't "Match", Second Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marnie

    There was some good information in this book but it's full of typos making it hard to read, & some of the advice & opinions I disagreed with. I thought the idea that all whites are automatically racists because they benefit from racism was ridiculous, & I thought the authors (who are both white & seem to think they're experts on how blacks, Hispanics, & Asians think) put way too much importance on race. They say basically that all members of a race think the same, which is obviously not true, & There was some good information in this book but it's full of typos making it hard to read, & some of the advice & opinions I disagreed with. I thought the idea that all whites are automatically racists because they benefit from racism was ridiculous, & I thought the authors (who are both white & seem to think they're experts on how blacks, Hispanics, & Asians think) put way too much importance on race. They say basically that all members of a race think the same, which is obviously not true, & that whites alone are responsible for stopping racism because they're the ones (or their ancestors) who create it. There's even a page where it talks about how we associate different colors with different things, like white is associated with goodness & purity, & brown is associated with poop. Yes, it actually says that & I cant figure out what it has to do with adoption. My opinion is the best way to raise a child of a different color is to treat them as an individual & a member of your family, not to assume they'll be a certain way or have certain issues because of their skin color or nationality. You also have to recognize that racism exists, but dont make it the center of your life or think it's behind everything: if your child gets a bad grade or doesnt get invited to a birthday party it's possible that they earned the grade or just arent that good friends with the kid having the party, you cant automatically assume it's because of racism like some of the people in this book. Looking for racism in every little situation would probably also trivialize real racism or race-related incidents that you really should get angry about. You also have to teach your child that they are beautiful & loved, & that their race has many people who are beautiful & successful, & acknowledge that they're a different color from you & that they're adopted & that those are good things that make the child special, as well as the child's personality & talents that have nothing to do with race. Me & my husband are white & we hope to adopt a black girl soon & we've been reading a lot about adoption, race, & parenting. This is not one of the best books & I wonder if one of its goals is really to discourage people from adopting transracially.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robert Beveridge

    Gail Steinberg and Beth Hall, Inside Transracial Adoption (Perspectives Press, 2000) The more books I encounter from Perspectives Press (and as my wife and I are in the process of adopting a child, I've been seeing a lot of them over the past six months or so), the more I wonder if it's not a vertical-market vanity press. Inside Transracial Adoption is just the latest link in the chain. The editing and proofreading, if any were done, were shoddy, making the book even tougher to read than its subj Gail Steinberg and Beth Hall, Inside Transracial Adoption (Perspectives Press, 2000) The more books I encounter from Perspectives Press (and as my wife and I are in the process of adopting a child, I've been seeing a lot of them over the past six months or so), the more I wonder if it's not a vertical-market vanity press. Inside Transracial Adoption is just the latest link in the chain. The editing and proofreading, if any were done, were shoddy, making the book even tougher to read than its subject matter would dictate, which is a vanity press hallmark. That, and I can't remember the last time I said this about bad proofreading, is the least of the book's problems. While the title and cover photos might lead you to believe that the book is a general primer for anyone adopting a child of a different race, once you actually start reading, it becomes obvious that the book was written specifically for white people adopting non-white people. It's pretty dangerous territory if the authors have any sort of ulterior agenda, and that they do also becomes obvious pretty quickly. Where there is an agenda, a fertile breeding ground, and a lack of editorial input, logical fallacies are sure to sprout. And here we get to the heart of the problem. There are enough straw men in this book to scare away every crow presently living on the planet. “White is right, Asians are the model minority (almost like white.) [sic] If you're brown, get down, if you're black, step back.” (44) is not the type of verbiage one expects to find in a manual about adoption, and the idea that it's promoting-- institutionalized racism in “popular culture and music”-- is simply ludicrous. Take a quick look at Billboard's top 20 albums and singles for any of the last twenty years or so and we'll talk about white privilege. (Since I happen to have 2007 to hand, we find Akon, Fergie [who also landed the top-selling single], Beyonce, Kanye West, and Jay-Z riding the stratosphere. White privilege, indeed!) Need it be said that assuming all whites are racist is a form of racism in itself? Do yourself a favor and look for something a little more balanced. (zero)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alina Borger

    This book is the major heavyweight title in transracial adoption. The authors themselves have adopted transracially, and include interviews with families (parents and kids) in all the various ages and stages. I think the single most helpful thing in this book is actually a comparison section, where the authors separate "issues all adoptive kids face" from "issues transracially adopted kids face." I found it SUPER helpful, because I realized that a lot of my fears, worries and other "dark scenari This book is the major heavyweight title in transracial adoption. The authors themselves have adopted transracially, and include interviews with families (parents and kids) in all the various ages and stages. I think the single most helpful thing in this book is actually a comparison section, where the authors separate "issues all adoptive kids face" from "issues transracially adopted kids face." I found it SUPER helpful, because I realized that a lot of my fears, worries and other "dark scenarios" were actually adoption-related and not necessarily race-related. There are also sections in the book that discuss issues faced by adopted kids from specific cultural groups, including Latinos, Asians and Africans. Note: the star system is a bit awkward here. To say I "really liked" a book like this is not exactly true. It's more like I found this book "really important" in my journey to and through interracial adoption.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Serena

    If you are a white parent adopting a child of a different race or ethnic background, you should definitely take a look at this book. If you are a parent who thinks "love will conquer all" or "I don't see skin color," you need to check out this book quickly. I generally consider myself well educated on adoption issues and a pretty progressive person, but this book still gave me a lot to think about. My favorite parts of the book were the personal stories from the authors (both white adoptive moth If you are a white parent adopting a child of a different race or ethnic background, you should definitely take a look at this book. If you are a parent who thinks "love will conquer all" or "I don't see skin color," you need to check out this book quickly. I generally consider myself well educated on adoption issues and a pretty progressive person, but this book still gave me a lot to think about. My favorite parts of the book were the personal stories from the authors (both white adoptive mothers) and the quotes from transracial adoptees. While I believe the information in the book is vital, I had to take away two stars for the sheer amount of editing errors present. If this book had been reviewed more thoroughly before publication, it would be worthy of five stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Wolgemuth

    The list of "Things to Keep in Mind as an Adoptive Parent" is long to begin with; "transracial" matters lengthen the list a bit more. We learn so much from those who have gone before us during our adoption adventure, and that's the case with this book. Hall and Steinberg are candid about what they've learned, where they've failed, and what other families can do to avoid their mistakes (and they've done a lot right too!).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shawna

    Great beginning knowledge about transracial adoption.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ebookwormy1

    I confess, I didn't get very far in this book... I got stuck in the second section on "Racial Identity". On the good side, this book did help me to understand racism better. The idea that because I'm white I am given advantages and considerations without asking for them was a eye opener to me. The concept that children of color we would adopt wouldn't be granted such consideration when they are not with my husband and I was helpful to understand. In addition, there are extensive annotated biblio I confess, I didn't get very far in this book... I got stuck in the second section on "Racial Identity". On the good side, this book did help me to understand racism better. The idea that because I'm white I am given advantages and considerations without asking for them was a eye opener to me. The concept that children of color we would adopt wouldn't be granted such consideration when they are not with my husband and I was helpful to understand. In addition, there are extensive annotated bibliographies by section and at the end of the book. I wanted to like the book. But, the negatives are it is incredibly difficult to read. Too long. Bizillion words per page. The style and lack of editing make the book feel like it is a fanatic treatise. The authors tend to focus more on problems, failures (their own and others), and challenges. There are MANY things to disagree with here. The author's approach seems very divisive and, if possible, overemphasizes race as the primary source of identity (maybe this would be rectified by perseverance further in the book). But, in the end, the more I thought about it, it wasn't really WHAT was said, but HOW it was said that is the problem. This was my first attempt/ exposure to researching our dream of transracial adoption. It was a discouraging one. I may go back to this book because of the positives, but in the meantime it is due back at the library and I think I'd rather start the process with a different perspective.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gemma Alexander

    Seriously, did this book even have an editor? Garbled sentences, random font changes, typos and spelling errors seriously detracted from the authors' thesis, however valid it may be. Their primary point is that race matters (kind of preaching to the choir- if adoptive parents didn't already believe it, they wouldn't read the book in the first place) and that while race is not everything, it is a factor in everything. Unfortunately, this meant that instead of a well structured, logically organize Seriously, did this book even have an editor? Garbled sentences, random font changes, typos and spelling errors seriously detracted from the authors' thesis, however valid it may be. Their primary point is that race matters (kind of preaching to the choir- if adoptive parents didn't already believe it, they wouldn't read the book in the first place) and that while race is not everything, it is a factor in everything. Unfortunately, this meant that instead of a well structured, logically organized book, what you get is a mish mash grab bag of topics and how race may relate to each one. So it took them 386 pages to say, "Race matters. It is an element of every aspect of your child's life. Once your child leaves your side, they are no longer the recipient of white privilege, and if they are not prepared handle the treatment members of their own race are subject to, you have not properly prepared them to survive on their own in our society. If you are white, you cannot provide them with this preparation directly, because you do not have the skills yourself. Your only choice is to enlist allies from within your child's race to help you educate your children about their birth culture and how members of their race survive in America." A good message, but I think they could have said it more impactfully in hundreds fewer pages. I was hoping for something more, maybe fewer "you shoulds" and more "how tos".

  9. 5 out of 5

    Betsy Dion

    There is a lot of information packed into this book. I found it difficult to read straight through, so I just read it in shorter sections over a long period of time. Definitely worth reading for anyone considering adopting a child of a different race. I didn't agree with every single conclusion, but it brought up a lot of relevant issues that should be considered. It helps that both authors have been through the process themselves. Reading this book can give a parent some preparation for what th There is a lot of information packed into this book. I found it difficult to read straight through, so I just read it in shorter sections over a long period of time. Definitely worth reading for anyone considering adopting a child of a different race. I didn't agree with every single conclusion, but it brought up a lot of relevant issues that should be considered. It helps that both authors have been through the process themselves. Reading this book can give a parent some preparation for what their child might experience, rather than having to deal with everything in the moment without the chance to think through the situation.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Super disorganized. And yet, I learned a lot from the authors' experiences. Some of the child development stuff I valued and other theory I ignored. Like all advice, you take what makes sense to you and you leave the rest. I appreciated some of their advice about how to approach conversations with family. Sort of a mixed bag of a book, but in a world where there are so few sources on transracial adoption, I appreciated just hearing people's stories and experiences. And I appreciate that they reg Super disorganized. And yet, I learned a lot from the authors' experiences. Some of the child development stuff I valued and other theory I ignored. Like all advice, you take what makes sense to you and you leave the rest. I appreciated some of their advice about how to approach conversations with family. Sort of a mixed bag of a book, but in a world where there are so few sources on transracial adoption, I appreciated just hearing people's stories and experiences. And I appreciate that they regard children who have been transracially adopted as the experts.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I found this to be a book with some excellent points and some dated, irritating perspectives. It is also quite repetitive at times, and the authors sometimes come off as more than a little pleased with themselves. Inside Transracial Adoption is one to be read with an open and critical mind. I certainly wouldn't take it as a primary text for learning about transracial adoption. This is one of those books that I used to give myself time to think about issues of transracial adoption rather than one I found this to be a book with some excellent points and some dated, irritating perspectives. It is also quite repetitive at times, and the authors sometimes come off as more than a little pleased with themselves. Inside Transracial Adoption is one to be read with an open and critical mind. I certainly wouldn't take it as a primary text for learning about transracial adoption. This is one of those books that I used to give myself time to think about issues of transracial adoption rather than one I would turn to for advice or guidance.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dayspring

    Written by two transracial adoptive mothers for transracial adoptive parents. Like any book, particularly books about parenting and families, I don't agree with all of the author's suggestions and perspectives. The strategies and suggestions are mostly based on the authors' experiences, not research, but still good thought-provoking ideas. Overall, this is one of the better books I have read on transracial adoption, and because it is often referred to in other adoption literature and by some ado Written by two transracial adoptive mothers for transracial adoptive parents. Like any book, particularly books about parenting and families, I don't agree with all of the author's suggestions and perspectives. The strategies and suggestions are mostly based on the authors' experiences, not research, but still good thought-provoking ideas. Overall, this is one of the better books I have read on transracial adoption, and because it is often referred to in other adoption literature and by some adoption agencies, I would recommend it to anyone planning to adopt transracially.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I disagreed with the authors' conclusions and point of view most of the time. It was interesting and made me think but I think the perspective in "I"m Chocolate, You're Vanilla" is more accurate and helpful.

  14. 4 out of 5

    shanamadele

    A must-read for anyone considering transracial adoption -- chock full of stories and questions that will help you think through the issues surrounding this decision.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    Many sections of this book I found insightful and seemed to speak to my experience.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    really good info, but need to remember that Jesus is bigger than 'doing it right'

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Good information...only some is applicable at this point in our journey, I think this will be a book I revisit as issues arise. I can see it becoming extremely helpful as she gets older.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    great book, challenging in many ways, just have to remember that ultimately Jesus is putting this child in your family and is sufficient despite your failings

  19. 4 out of 5

    Polly

    2.5 Stars. It was lengthy and disorganized, still I found their personal experiences to be beneficial. I'm glad they included excerpts from "experts" (most of whom were adoptees).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tami

    Some good things to think about.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jane Hinton

    This book was very basic, a 101 to building a multi-cultural family through adoption.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chase Turner

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Vigneault

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abby Turner

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Riley

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  27. 4 out of 5

    Becky

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Budke

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kate

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