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Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids Eating Good Food

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Mother of three, Jessica Seinfeld wages a personal war against sugars, packaged foods, and other nutritional saboteurs, offering appetising alternatives for parents who find themselves succumbing to the fastest and easiest (and least healthy) choices available to them.


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Mother of three, Jessica Seinfeld wages a personal war against sugars, packaged foods, and other nutritional saboteurs, offering appetising alternatives for parents who find themselves succumbing to the fastest and easiest (and least healthy) choices available to them.

30 review for Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids Eating Good Food

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I hate this book. Obviously, I'm not trying to be objective, and I'm kind of in a bad mood as I'm writing this :( I feel like this BOOK is deceptive! The deal is, if you want to "sneak" healthy stuff into kids' foods (or, into your own food, as I was hoping to do)you have to make an actual major lifestyle change: prepare to spend hours at a time to boiling up vegetables and and liquefying them in a blender, then freezing them for a future date when you can trick your kids into eating them by sayin I hate this book. Obviously, I'm not trying to be objective, and I'm kind of in a bad mood as I'm writing this :( I feel like this BOOK is deceptive! The deal is, if you want to "sneak" healthy stuff into kids' foods (or, into your own food, as I was hoping to do)you have to make an actual major lifestyle change: prepare to spend hours at a time to boiling up vegetables and and liquefying them in a blender, then freezing them for a future date when you can trick your kids into eating them by saying, "Hey, kid, how about some banana cream pie, partly filled with liquid squash?" Who would do all of this, unless they were actually, certifiably crazy? I don't know how this book got published! About 1% (or less) of the people who purchase this book are going to follow the strange plan of this loony lady... Actually, to answer my own question as to how it got published, it's because it has an appealing cover and title, and when you flip through the thing it's filled with colorful photographs of delicious-looking recipes. It's only when you sit down and give it a good read that you see that this mom is insane. I guess my biggest question is, are this lady's cooking tactics really of nutritional value? She (probably) can't hurt the kids with her soupy concoctions, but isn't it true that once you boil the heck out of vegetables and liquefy them, the vitamins and other good stuff go completely down the... well... toilet? Speaking of which, maybe the sneaking-in-the-vegetables thing is purely for roughage (sp) purposes. So why puree them? Doesn't that defeat the purpose? My alternative title would be, "How to Give Your Kids Diarrhea". I'm bitter because this book was kind of expensive and I felt duped. Therefore, I consider this review a sort of public service message: use it well.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Just reading the recipes made my stomach turn. You want your kiddos to eat more fruits and veggies? You have to start them at the baby stage. If you are trying to do damage control and educate your kid's taste buds at pre-school age forward, I still don't see how these recipes could work. I understand that's what this author is trying to do, but the tiny amounts of pureed veggies added to normal recipes do not provide enough of a nutrional boost to outweigh the difference in taste and will not in Just reading the recipes made my stomach turn. You want your kiddos to eat more fruits and veggies? You have to start them at the baby stage. If you are trying to do damage control and educate your kid's taste buds at pre-school age forward, I still don't see how these recipes could work. I understand that's what this author is trying to do, but the tiny amounts of pureed veggies added to normal recipes do not provide enough of a nutrional boost to outweigh the difference in taste and will not in ANY way adapt your kids to eating more veggies/fruits in their pure form. Here's how I see it. 1) When they are baby/toddlers..no problem...they eat anything. They take their cues from you. If you look apprehensive giving them a bite of something, ie "Oh Cr*p...they're NOT going to like this" Guess what? they won't. 2) When they are preschool...introduce the "no thank you" bite This translates to "You don't want more? OK you don't have to." BUT you repeat this game with every food item until it becomes an acquired taste. Because let's face it. How many of us thought beer was the BOMB the first time we tried it? AND 3) Most importantly....get them in the kitchen cooking with you EVERY day from the time that they can stand upright, pull a step stool to the counter and articulate. My two sons at three years of age could and did the smallest of tasks, ie shredding lettuce for salads, mixing ingredients in a bowl, patting a meatloaf into a pan, etc. Yes it's a pain in the arse. Yes it takes three times as long to make dinner. Yes they make a huge freaking mess. Yes you can do it faster yourself. Yes, it isin't perfect. I work outside the home. Speedy dinners on the table were and are a priority. But an even bigger priority for me was and is to raise kids with healthy, sane appetites. Bottom line...they were invested and appreciative of how long it took to make the meal and how their food was made from an early age and therefore much more inclined to eat and less inclined to whine. Spinach in blueberry bars? I call bullsh*t.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I prefer "sneaky chef" and use those recipes more often so far, but you can certainly get some great ideas here as well. As a mommy to a 4 year old boy with autism and resulting food sensory (not to mention behavioral and extreme "fear of the unknown") issues, both books are real life-savers. I feel much better about the food I give to my kids when I sneak these veggies in and the recipes I have tried so far really are quite good. To pass the taste test in my household is a big deal! While I ackn I prefer "sneaky chef" and use those recipes more often so far, but you can certainly get some great ideas here as well. As a mommy to a 4 year old boy with autism and resulting food sensory (not to mention behavioral and extreme "fear of the unknown") issues, both books are real life-savers. I feel much better about the food I give to my kids when I sneak these veggies in and the recipes I have tried so far really are quite good. To pass the taste test in my household is a big deal! While I acknowledge that the small amount of veggies in a single recipe may not make a huge difference, added up over the course of a day (I sneak something into almost everything I feed them these days---), I certainly feel better about myself as a parent. To those of you who are lucky enough to have children who eat what you put in front of them, count your blessings you don't need to use this book. I would strongly prefer to put the veggies on the table in their natural state, but this has really restored some of my confidence as mother-nurturer-giver of life.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Books Ring Mah Bell

    meh. I'm not going to puree spinach in hide it in brownies. No way. meh. I'm not going to puree spinach in hide it in brownies. No way.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    When I first heard the buzz about this cookbook I was somewhat excited. I'm a cookbook junkie and love trying new things. I checked my local book stores, the book was sold out and had waiting lists! This knowledge only made the book more enticing to me. I happened upon the elusive book(on sale!) in a supermarket a few days later and I snatched the only copy without first flipping through the pages, afterall books with waiting lists can't be wrong. I was sorely disappointed! Honestly, when adding When I first heard the buzz about this cookbook I was somewhat excited. I'm a cookbook junkie and love trying new things. I checked my local book stores, the book was sold out and had waiting lists! This knowledge only made the book more enticing to me. I happened upon the elusive book(on sale!) in a supermarket a few days later and I snatched the only copy without first flipping through the pages, afterall books with waiting lists can't be wrong. I was sorely disappointed! Honestly, when adding 1/4 to 1/2 cup of cooked, pureed, butternut squash to a recipe that serves four, six (or eight!), you're not adding a heck of a lot of additional nutritional value. I've tried a few recipes from this book and they've been sub-par at best. The banana bread was inedible. If good eaters won't eat this stuff, it is highly doubtful a picky eater will. Parents who want their kids to eat healthy meals should forgo this cookbook and threaten to withhold dessert for those who won't eat their spinach. My copy will soon be listed on ebay.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Seinfeld is so caught up in making sure everything her kids eat has vegetables in it, that she doesn't seem to care what their cholesterol is like! It seems like everything in this book is fried, and she always uses margarine, never butter. Margarine is TERRIBLE for you! Egad! I'm also baffled by places where things like applesauce can easily be substituted for oil (as in cakes or banana bread), yet she lists a big ol' 1/2 c. of oil in the ingredients along with something like pureed navy beans Seinfeld is so caught up in making sure everything her kids eat has vegetables in it, that she doesn't seem to care what their cholesterol is like! It seems like everything in this book is fried, and she always uses margarine, never butter. Margarine is TERRIBLE for you! Egad! I'm also baffled by places where things like applesauce can easily be substituted for oil (as in cakes or banana bread), yet she lists a big ol' 1/2 c. of oil in the ingredients along with something like pureed navy beans to make it "healthy." Pureed navy beans do not cancel out the oil and margarine, my friend. The other con is that most of the recipes take between 45 minutes to an hour, and that's even if you have your purees done in advance. When I'm hustling to make dinner before people start snacking, I do not have time to boil, blend, stir, shape and fry rice balls. On the pro side, however: the turkey meatloaf is in fact one of the best meatloaf recipes I've ever found. Several of the recipes really are great, and she gives you some good ideas for how to plan meals, and how to slip veggies into your regular recipes. For instance: pureed butternut squash or cauliflower can be mixed into macaroni and cheese, and the squash is also great with anything with a marinara sauce. Cauliflower mashed with your potatoes makes them lighter and gives them a good flavor without being obvious. I would recommend checking this book out from the library, reading through it, and maybe taking some notes, rather than buying it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Things I did not like about this book: 1. Children's cookbooks depress me. 2. Cookbook from the library? Ick. 3. Jessica Seinfeld? You know she really has a staff of gourmet chefs. 4. As with most cookbooks, this one is light on vegetarian and egg- and milk-free options. 5. (Most importantly) I'm not sure I agree with the whole sneaky food thing. Fruits and vegetables are SO good. Kids should just want to eat them if you offer them enough, right? This deception bothers me. 6. The stocking up thing sh Things I did not like about this book: 1. Children's cookbooks depress me. 2. Cookbook from the library? Ick. 3. Jessica Seinfeld? You know she really has a staff of gourmet chefs. 4. As with most cookbooks, this one is light on vegetarian and egg- and milk-free options. 5. (Most importantly) I'm not sure I agree with the whole sneaky food thing. Fruits and vegetables are SO good. Kids should just want to eat them if you offer them enough, right? This deception bothers me. 6. The stocking up thing she suggests. Stocking up never works for me -- I just get so wasteful. I can only buy exactly what I need that week or I might as well just take our pay check and let it mold in our fridge. Things I really liked about this book: 1. I really liked the nutrition part in the beginning. Who knew kids were suppose to be fed three veggies and two fruits a day? Or that you can leave the peels on the apples for the puree? 2. I actually really like Jessica Seinfeld. All the puree stuff? Every Sunday night? And the labeled bags? She is totally OCD, in a you-can-totally-be-my-friend kind of way. 3. This book has great, common sense suggestions. Multiple courses. Letting toddlers serve themselves. Veggies with (deceptively healthy) dip while you're making dinner. A lot of the recipes looked good, too.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kelli Oliver George

    First, I feel I should confess that I have a Cookbook Compulsion. I LOVE reading what I refer to as my Kitchen Porn and I do have a collection of cookbooks that I like to peruse just for fun. One of my most treasured cookbooks is my Boston Cooking School Cook Book by Fannie Farmer. I will probably never actually cook something from Fannie Farmer's selections, but it is still fun to read. I also have my grandma's first ever cookbook she purchased as a newlywed back in the 40s. And I own a copy of First, I feel I should confess that I have a Cookbook Compulsion. I LOVE reading what I refer to as my Kitchen Porn and I do have a collection of cookbooks that I like to peruse just for fun. One of my most treasured cookbooks is my Boston Cooking School Cook Book by Fannie Farmer. I will probably never actually cook something from Fannie Farmer's selections, but it is still fun to read. I also have my grandma's first ever cookbook she purchased as a newlywed back in the 40s. And I own a copy of Average Jane's family cookbook. Also, I totally scooped up Sophia Loren's family cookbook with excitement. Um. Yeah. The list goes on because I enjoy reading cookbooks. Anyway.....when I saw Deceptively Delicious a few weeks ago book, I was immediately interested and saved it to my Amazon cart to consider. So. Is it worth the hype? Probably not. However, it is truly a fun, easy cookbook that is worthy of a Picky, Childish Palate. Dude - EASY. The recipes are very simple to follow and she does a great job with explaining the steps for preparation. Also, this book won me over with its adorable anecdotes, telling quotes and whimsical illustrations. I would like to make one, small criticism of this cookbook - the recipes are definitely built for folks who like bland food. I still think most Americans underestimate the toddler palate. We often give Arun food that is too spicy for him. He knows now that his world has not collapsed and that he simply needs to reach for his water. After a few sips of water, he invariably reaches for more food. However, he is only two years old and I am hearing that the ages of 3 to 4 are tough ones for the whole issues of Food Fights so you can rest assured that I am not overly confident over here. Finally, I do not think it entirely uncool to shove veggies into recipes. After all, grandmas have been pushing zucchini into bread for years. Have you complained?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Karetchko

    I was curious about this book so I signed it out from the library. I'd read an article in Vegetarian Times a couple of years ago suggesting the idea of adding veggie purees to kids' foods, so I knew the basic idea wasn't all that original, but I liked the general concept and thought I'd check it out. I've only tried two recipes so far and I probably won't try others simply because the two I tried didn't work very well. When I tried to make the tofu nuggets, the puree wouldn't stick to the tofu a I was curious about this book so I signed it out from the library. I'd read an article in Vegetarian Times a couple of years ago suggesting the idea of adding veggie purees to kids' foods, so I knew the basic idea wasn't all that original, but I liked the general concept and thought I'd check it out. I've only tried two recipes so far and I probably won't try others simply because the two I tried didn't work very well. When I tried to make the tofu nuggets, the puree wouldn't stick to the tofu at all. With some effort, I managed to mound some puree onto the tofu and add the bread crumbs, but I don't think any kid would be fooled into eating veggies from this recipe! Plus, the recipe involves salting the tofu and then frying it if/after you manage to get it breaded at all. I don't really need more salt and oil in my diet and I bet most kids don't, either. I also tried the mozzarella sticks, and those just turned into mozzarella blobs instead of anything stick-like. If the ideas behind any of the recipes interest you, I'd recommend finding a good recipe to start with and then experimentally adding the veggie puree instead of relying on these recipes. I was a kid who wasn't really nuts about veggies most of the time (I think kids sometimes get a memo that they're not supposed to like certain things), but as an adult I'm a vegetarian and eat pretty much every vegetable under the sun. I think sometimes kids would eat veggies more if they were cooked with better seasonings, and I also think it's not always such a big deal if kids don't like veggies at a certain rebellious age. At the end of the day, I don't know if the 1/8 of a cup of veggie puree that the kids would get in some of these recipes would really make all that much of a difference in terms of their willingness to eat vegetables.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    As the parent of a child who eats nothing but pancakes and PB& J (on whole wheat, at least), I bought this book the second I saw it on the today show. Also, chocolate pudding loaded with avocado and only 69 calories shows some promise for me as well! ************************************************************* I have glanced at this and so far I am still excited, even though I have heard the recipes aren't all they are cracked up to be. ************************************************************ I As the parent of a child who eats nothing but pancakes and PB& J (on whole wheat, at least), I bought this book the second I saw it on the today show. Also, chocolate pudding loaded with avocado and only 69 calories shows some promise for me as well! ************************************************************* I have glanced at this and so far I am still excited, even though I have heard the recipes aren't all they are cracked up to be. ************************************************************ I started puree-ing. I really recommend a food processor over a blender. The blender is great for margaritas, but hard to scoop out avocado. I have learned, or I at least suspect, that "roasting" is the same thing as baking, but for regular food items as opposed to desert (I'm not domestic, this is a big step) and also that organic roasted butternut squash is amazingly good. I have not started all of the recipes, but I am giving this book five stars for the following reasons: 1. I roasted butter nut squash 2. It's fun to decive your kids 3. 3 year old Harry has chosen several items he wants to eat 4. It explains specific nutritional information for commom fruits and veggies 5. it tells you how to prepare fruits and veggies for puree, which also explains to the not-so-domestic how to cook many of the items6. Jessica Seinfeld comes across as a regular person, and I find myself quoting her: "Jessica had started to dread dinnertime, too." or "Jessica said Jerry will pretty much eat anything without complaining."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    I've had this for a few months and went through the grueling process of making my own purees and freezing them in ice cube trays (my sister-in-law uses baby food...I thought I'd be ultra frugal) but my children are just too darn smart for their own good. They asked what I was making and now ask if I'm cooking anything with that yucky spinach puree for dinner, because they definitely don't want any of that. In all that time, I've made just two recipes from the book and they didn't like either one I've had this for a few months and went through the grueling process of making my own purees and freezing them in ice cube trays (my sister-in-law uses baby food...I thought I'd be ultra frugal) but my children are just too darn smart for their own good. They asked what I was making and now ask if I'm cooking anything with that yucky spinach puree for dinner, because they definitely don't want any of that. In all that time, I've made just two recipes from the book and they didn't like either one. Not even a little! I really did like the mac and cheese with cauliflower, but I think I'd like it better with squash. All in all, a lot of trouble making one more thing my kids won't eat. Plus, most recipes only have 1/2 cup of a vegetable puree, maybe 1/2 cup of two different kinds, and I had to add a lot of water to get my blender to get the consistency right. How much good can that really do? I think I'll just keep using my old standby approach (everything tastes good with ranch!) and they will eventually be in charge of their own bodies!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I really like this cookbook. I am single but I picked it up because I have never been a cooker and it looked like something pretty simple. I really like the presentation and the writing style. I don't think the purees take that long to prepare, but I am cooking for one. Maybe if I were cooking for a family it would be different. I have made the applesauce muffins (with carrot puree) and I LOVE them! They are delicious. I also made the scrambled eggs with spinach and the mac and cheese with cauli I really like this cookbook. I am single but I picked it up because I have never been a cooker and it looked like something pretty simple. I really like the presentation and the writing style. I don't think the purees take that long to prepare, but I am cooking for one. Maybe if I were cooking for a family it would be different. I have made the applesauce muffins (with carrot puree) and I LOVE them! They are delicious. I also made the scrambled eggs with spinach and the mac and cheese with cauliflower. They are both really good, and I'm excited to try more. I think people are too critical about this cookbook. The main point of any cook book is to make foods you will want to eat and like to eat. If you don't like the foods you make, then the cookbook isn't good. The whole "deciving" chidlren point isn't the most important thing here, I think it's the fact that the foods you cook are yummy and healthier than buying the food already made. AND it's fun!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    One of my two favorite cookbooks. Although I have only tried a few of the actual recipes, the concept of using pureed veggies in my own recipes has been incredible! I now "sneak" buttnernut squash, carrots and sweet potatoes into many of our dinners, and no one knows! It's a great way to get your family to eat their veggies. One of my two favorite cookbooks. Although I have only tried a few of the actual recipes, the concept of using pureed veggies in my own recipes has been incredible! I now "sneak" buttnernut squash, carrots and sweet potatoes into many of our dinners, and no one knows! It's a great way to get your family to eat their veggies.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annalisa

    I am always looking for alternate ingredients for recipes loaded with a lot of caloric, low-nutrition ingredients. In the end I think foods taste better with more natural ingredients (and without butter dripping through them which I can't imagine people love; it makes me sick to my stomach). So for that I found some good tips in this book. Such as using an avocado instead of butter in a recipe. If you're going to have a treat, why not make a slightly healthier version? However I highly disagree w I am always looking for alternate ingredients for recipes loaded with a lot of caloric, low-nutrition ingredients. In the end I think foods taste better with more natural ingredients (and without butter dripping through them which I can't imagine people love; it makes me sick to my stomach). So for that I found some good tips in this book. Such as using an avocado instead of butter in a recipe. If you're going to have a treat, why not make a slightly healthier version? However I highly disagree with the concept of presenting seemingly unhealthy food to your kids with pureed health food in it. First of all, I don't believe in deceiving your children. Sure sometimes deceit is necessary, but it shouldn't be a common occurrence. When my daughter asked me what was in any of these recipes I told her. Start feeding your children healthy food at the onset and they'll be more receptive to natural foods. Secondly, what makes those natural foods better for your system is that your body has to break them down. You puree them so a baby doesn't have to do all that digestive work. The rest of us can and should handle foods without the extra processing. The best option is the apple, not an apple broken down in applesauce. Having said that, I know that some children are just prone to enjoy certain kinds of foods over others. If you have a child you're having trouble with, by all means get those vitamins and minerals in anyway you can. If my daughter had a difficult time eating fruits and vegetables I would be attempting to sneak them in somehow too. And if you're going to serve something like macaroni and cheese for dinner, throwing in a some vegetable puree is better than nothing. A better option would be to serve something healthier, but sometimes it's just going to be mac and cheese. Just don't use vegetable purees as your only source and only attempt to get your children to eat fruits and vegetable. And don't go around with the misconceived notion that children won't like healthy food without trying it on them first. Got it? Pick up the book for the healthy substitutes not as a cure-all for getting your children to eat their greens. You should try the old-fashioned way first. Use the recipes for a healthier version of a treat. I don't think these recipes should be used for every meal, only occasional substitutes. I tried a few recipes in this book and some were surprisingly good. Then I tried one (I wish I could remember which) and it tasted just like it sounded: ground up greens mulched with bitter unsweetened chocolate. I've been a little gun shy since. But I'm sure there are better recipes in the book than the few I've tried. Maybe if I ever replace my broken blender I'll try a few more options. The recipes do take a little more effort and planning but that's usually the case when you go with a healthier lifestyle (and once again this isn't the healthiest option).

  15. 4 out of 5

    FabulousRaye

    I don't have biological children of my own. My soon to be legal husband-Mr. Bunny- does. I have quite a few little nieces, nephews, and friends with children. Occasionally, I get to cook for them. Also, I have two things the author does not. Which are a degree in culinary arts and a certification in nutrition. Take the above info as you will. Anyway... I had issues with this book, as did Mr. Bunny when I told him about it. We're both against hiding pureed vegetables and fruit in meals. It's a very I don't have biological children of my own. My soon to be legal husband-Mr. Bunny- does. I have quite a few little nieces, nephews, and friends with children. Occasionally, I get to cook for them. Also, I have two things the author does not. Which are a degree in culinary arts and a certification in nutrition. Take the above info as you will. Anyway... I had issues with this book, as did Mr. Bunny when I told him about it. We're both against hiding pureed vegetables and fruit in meals. It's a very deceptive thing to do to a child. I can understand children not liking various foods and being picky about what they eat. By hiding the purees in another dish, they aren't being given the option to like them. My little nieces will try a new food or an item they don't normally like, if I'm eating it. Also, if I'm at the table raving about the food, it causes them want it. They've said "Ohhh, I want some! Aunt Raye-Raye is eating it!" What also helps is cooking vegetables and fruits properly. Not cooking them into mush nor serving them undercooked. If you're cooking them wrong, they aren't going to taste like they should. Another issue I had is, what mother has the time to make extraneous purees? My SAHM friends barely have time to take a shower. I believe my working mom friends would laugh at the very idea. Hell, I'm unemployed with a lot of free time, and even I wouldn't take the time to make them! I'm rather suspicious about how the finished recipes would taste. Maybe it's just me and my training, but I would notice if you added spinach puree to a pan of brownies. I thought the purees the author wanted to you to add to various recipes were odd. Cauliflower puree in banana bread? Finally, I had problems with how nutritious the recipes claimed to be. I don't think by adding a couple teaspoons of puree it's going to help much nutritionally. I'm against using "low fat" mayonnaise, sour cream, and cream cheese. They have items added to them that aren't that healthy. As long as you use the former ingredients in moderation, you should be fine. Instead of using cooking spray-like Pam-which also isn't that healthy for you, buy a small oil mister. Put some nice virgin olive oil in it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    I have a brand new blender and a 6 month old baby, so purees are right up my alley. We eat a ton of veggies, but the main purees in this book are veggies we DONT normally eat, (cauliflower, squash, sweet potato, carrot, and pumpkin.) Who really follows a recipe exactly, but the ideas of what veggies to mix into what kinds of food is so helpful. Also I can make puree for the baby and then use the rest in meals for the family. My favorite is squash in hot chocolate. We got a ton of hot chocolate fo I have a brand new blender and a 6 month old baby, so purees are right up my alley. We eat a ton of veggies, but the main purees in this book are veggies we DONT normally eat, (cauliflower, squash, sweet potato, carrot, and pumpkin.) Who really follows a recipe exactly, but the ideas of what veggies to mix into what kinds of food is so helpful. Also I can make puree for the baby and then use the rest in meals for the family. My favorite is squash in hot chocolate. We got a ton of hot chocolate for Christmas and 50 glasses of sugar water didn't excite me, but 50 glasses of chocolate flavored squash seems okay. 1 TBS per cup of mix got the thumbs up from my kids. I made cauliflower, squash, and white bean puree one night after the kids went to bed. Today I am making sweet potato and I have tons of pumpkin in cans. After reading some reviews it looked to me like it was important to have fairly thick purees rather than watery ones, so the blender had a hard time since I used so little water, but I got it done alright. I've been using beet puree in cake and applesauce and banana in breakfast foods for awhile already. Those are winners for sure. By the way, the more water in the puree, the longer a beet cake or muffin has to cook. Recipe Reviews: Cauliflower in tuna sandwiches, puree for half the mayo, great! Cauliflower in potato soup, five stars, I put squash in too, for the cheese color. It worked great. Squash on grilled cheese, I spread some on a normal grilled cheese like butter and I liked it, but no one else wanted to try it. I also think squash and sweet potato purees might be nice side dishes "as- is". I put grated carrot in the spaghetti sauce last night, was that in the book or am I just on a roll? Health Tip !!!Use butter NOT "trans-fat-free-margarine" in your baking!!!! Health Tip The pages on child nutrition seemed like USDA commercials to me. Kids need lots of veggies, fruit, and whole grains, pretty simple IMO.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This book deserves five stars for creativity--the woman is ingenius not just in the idea to put vegetable purees into food, but to then create some amazing recipes that actually taste good. I read this in one sitting at Barnes and Nobles and was pretty impressed. But...the problem I see is that the future is sadly invisible in this type of approach to food and children. At what age do you stop making vegetable purees to put into your foods and start dishing out the real deal? And when that day c This book deserves five stars for creativity--the woman is ingenius not just in the idea to put vegetable purees into food, but to then create some amazing recipes that actually taste good. I read this in one sitting at Barnes and Nobles and was pretty impressed. But...the problem I see is that the future is sadly invisible in this type of approach to food and children. At what age do you stop making vegetable purees to put into your foods and start dishing out the real deal? And when that day comes...what are you going to do with the child who does not recognize carrots, broccoli, peas, or any other vegetable, because h/she has never laid eyes on them before? How will you convince them to eat them then? I think the idea is wonderful, but the practicality is really lacking. I feed my children homemade vegetable purees as babies, instead of the jarred stuff, so they are some more used to the taste of things, but of course many young children are typically picky because of diverse textures and flavors---so that doesn't mean they easily eat real vegetables once they can chew their food. I believe however that it is better to use principles of compromise, fun, and patience, rather than to do it this way---I think getting a ten year old to start eating carrots would be much more difficult than starting with a two year old.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    I was hoping for a slot in the "Good Moms Club" so I got this book in hopes of slipping veggies into my kids food unbenownst to them to get their veggie intake higher. Well, I tried...it didn't work. I tried 4 different recipes and while the purees were hidden and the kids didn't know they were there, they still didn't love the food. To top it off, the preparation took *forever*. I guess once I have a stockpile of frozen purees it will cut down the prep-time but we didn't like the ones we tried I was hoping for a slot in the "Good Moms Club" so I got this book in hopes of slipping veggies into my kids food unbenownst to them to get their veggie intake higher. Well, I tried...it didn't work. I tried 4 different recipes and while the purees were hidden and the kids didn't know they were there, they still didn't love the food. To top it off, the preparation took *forever*. I guess once I have a stockpile of frozen purees it will cut down the prep-time but we didn't like the ones we tried enough to WANT to stockpile purees. I'm also not impressed with the amount of veggies each kid gets in a serving. If you add a 1/2 cup or 1 cup of puree to a recipe that serves four, the per serving amount of veggies is pretty small. It just seems like less work to get a veggie tray from Sams Club for $9 and let them have at it or not. I'll try one or two more (maybe dessert recipes this time) and pass the book onto someone else. ~Rhonda

  19. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    Why not trick your kids into eating "good foods"? What a terrific idea! Because veggies are shite, everyone knows that. Right? Or maybe you can just get in to the habit of modeling good eating, enjoying food, (vegetables included) and not making meals into a power struggle. It's just crazy enough that it might work. This book sucks because its premise sucks. I haven't made any of the recipes because I would rather cook vegetables unhidden and offer them (over and over, at every meal) to my kid whi Why not trick your kids into eating "good foods"? What a terrific idea! Because veggies are shite, everyone knows that. Right? Or maybe you can just get in to the habit of modeling good eating, enjoying food, (vegetables included) and not making meals into a power struggle. It's just crazy enough that it might work. This book sucks because its premise sucks. I haven't made any of the recipes because I would rather cook vegetables unhidden and offer them (over and over, at every meal) to my kid while eating them myself. Because vegetables are delicious! And there are plenty of people who eat them not out of some duty to themselves or their parents but because they enjoy them. I bet you a million dollars that none of those people's parents ever hid vegetables in macaroni and cheese to deceive them into eating them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    ROSALIE

    Yesterday I checked this book out at the library and today I bought one for myself at Seagull Book. It's a smart book to have, full of tips and some serious concocting. This author is serious about her stuff, presented with vintage charm and a Mother-Knows-What's-Good-For-You strength.To be appreciated also are Vitamins and Minerals tables geared specifically for children. I love the idea of fortifying fun foods with extra nutrition from vegetable purees. It's my husband who won't eat vegies if Yesterday I checked this book out at the library and today I bought one for myself at Seagull Book. It's a smart book to have, full of tips and some serious concocting. This author is serious about her stuff, presented with vintage charm and a Mother-Knows-What's-Good-For-You strength.To be appreciated also are Vitamins and Minerals tables geared specifically for children. I love the idea of fortifying fun foods with extra nutrition from vegetable purees. It's my husband who won't eat vegies if they aren't peas or carrots. I am looking forward to sneaking in some vitamins from other sources to him, because he needs them too. Ah-ha, what a fun secret I'm going to have.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    So for me it’s really weird reading a cookbook for a book challenge and review. I use cookbooks but no haven’t ever sat down and “read” a cookbook. I chose this one for a challenge in a book club. I bought this book when it first was published because I remember the Seinfelds on either “Live With Regis and Kelly” or if it was already “Live with Kelly and Michael”. Either way, it was when my 3 kids were young and my husband and I were very tired of feeding the kids foods in the “brown” category s So for me it’s really weird reading a cookbook for a book challenge and review. I use cookbooks but no haven’t ever sat down and “read” a cookbook. I chose this one for a challenge in a book club. I bought this book when it first was published because I remember the Seinfelds on either “Live With Regis and Kelly” or if it was already “Live with Kelly and Michael”. Either way, it was when my 3 kids were young and my husband and I were very tired of feeding the kids foods in the “brown” category such as chicken nuggets, hot dogs, French fries, “tater tots”, macaroni and cheese, spaghetti and marinara, grilled cheese, and sometimes grilled chicken (if we were lucky) 😊 At this point in our lives, we were cooking two or more meals a night like short order cooks because we sure weren’t eating dinasaur shaped “chicken” nuggets. So the adults had a real meal and we made to order dinners for our kids. When I saw Jessica Seinfeld on TV showing how easy it was to get real vegetables hidden in kids food, it was like magic to me. I also asked myself why I didn’t think of it myself! So I immediately went to the bookstore, they existed back then, and bought this beautiful hardcover cookbook at full price. It is a gorgeous book when it’s new. It’s hardcover but spiral bound inside which made turning the pages easy and the pages didn’t try to close because of the spiral binding inside. The illustrations are made to be reminiscent of the 1950’s family but were colored with pastels: light pinks, blues, greens, yellows, etc. It’s actually quite beautiful. The point of the cookbook was to purée vegetables and put them in different sauces such as spaghetti sauce, barbecue sauce and sauce for stir fry. Then move up to adding finely chopped vegetables of any variety into meatballs, hamburgers, etc. I want to finish this review because I used it quite a bit when my kids were younger and talk about some of the kids’ favorites. However it’s 1:36 am and I want to go to bed. But I highly recommend it if you have picky eaters but I think the things in this cookbook became pretty commonplace after this book came out. It was a lifesaver for my family and eventually ended the need to make multiple meals a night. I give it 5 stars! *I will come back and talk about specific recipes that worked and didn’t.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    4.5 stars. I love this cookbook! The reason that I didn't give it 5 stars is that some of the recipes call for margarine, which I don't use. But aside from that, I'm singing the book's praises. Jessica Seinfeld and the nutritionists whom she partnered with clearly put a lot of thought into each page. It has some outstanding recipes (my son and husband loved the sloppy Joe's and butternut squash soup!) many of which can be made vegetarian by substituting with tofu. Nutrition tips for kids are als 4.5 stars. I love this cookbook! The reason that I didn't give it 5 stars is that some of the recipes call for margarine, which I don't use. But aside from that, I'm singing the book's praises. Jessica Seinfeld and the nutritionists whom she partnered with clearly put a lot of thought into each page. It has some outstanding recipes (my son and husband loved the sloppy Joe's and butternut squash soup!) many of which can be made vegetarian by substituting with tofu. Nutrition tips for kids are also provided, and a guide on how to make purées. I had checked this out from the library, but decided to buy my own copy!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Well I've had this book for a while now, but haven't been compelled to do anything with it. Hard for me to think about all the time for prep and cooking for things that I wasn't sure Natasha (or I for that matter) would like. I tried a recipe out of Parent's mag, not from this book, but with the same concept - Sweet Potato bars. Natasha helped me make them, great fun cooking experience...until we tasted them. No Thank You!!! And I love sweet potatoes. I was just about to write it off as a good i Well I've had this book for a while now, but haven't been compelled to do anything with it. Hard for me to think about all the time for prep and cooking for things that I wasn't sure Natasha (or I for that matter) would like. I tried a recipe out of Parent's mag, not from this book, but with the same concept - Sweet Potato bars. Natasha helped me make them, great fun cooking experience...until we tasted them. No Thank You!!! And I love sweet potatoes. I was just about to write it off as a good idea...for someone else, when I talked to a friend who said that she and her family loved the recipes in this book. So, I just spent the morning cooking and pureeing a whole bunch of veggies. It actually was pretty easy and I think the thought of the work was much worse than it was. My sister and her two girls are coming this week, so perhaps I'll give it a whirl on the kids then. And if that doesn't work...we'll go back to good ol' North Carolina BBQ!! Worst case scenario, I've got a whole bunch of frozen organic veggie purees for Christina's meals. So at least for me, it won't be too much of a waste of time. I'll let you know... Well I made the banana pudding pie (with squash and cantelope purees) and the spiced gingerbread (with broccoli and carrot purees) I liked the banana pie...but I think I was the only one. My sister, her girls, and I all liked the gingerbread...but probably just as much as if I had made a regular zucchini bread and Natasha wasn't a fan (she was hoping for the spicy ginger snaps we often get and this didn't live up!...my Swede!) And that one was a lot of work. So, I'm not so sure that I will continue trying. Although I've heard that the pink pancakes are a hit (have beets in them and kids like the color) and I should probably try one of the mains before it goes in with my other dusty cookbooks. At least, Christina is getting the benefit of the purees.

  24. 5 out of 5

    K.B. Lever

    I love finding ways to get my picky eater to eat her fruits and vegetables. Let me introduce you to Ava. She's four and refuses to eat anything that doesn't have the consistency of a cracker or taste like a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. This year, she's actually stretched and will now eat hamburgers, hot dogs, pizza, and tacos. Unhealthy heaven. She refuses to eat pasta, most fruits, all vegetables (cooked or raw), beans, cakes or ice cream (which I'm okay with), or soups. I found this book o I love finding ways to get my picky eater to eat her fruits and vegetables. Let me introduce you to Ava. She's four and refuses to eat anything that doesn't have the consistency of a cracker or taste like a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. This year, she's actually stretched and will now eat hamburgers, hot dogs, pizza, and tacos. Unhealthy heaven. She refuses to eat pasta, most fruits, all vegetables (cooked or raw), beans, cakes or ice cream (which I'm okay with), or soups. I found this book on sale in the bargain bin at Food Lion grocery store. I thought it looked interesting and since I never eat what I'm supposed to either, I decided we both needed to give it a try. So far today we've fixed the pancakes (spiked with sweet potatoes) and the oatmeal raisin cookies (spiked with zucchini and bananas). Both were hits with her! Thank goodness! The taste of the pancakes were excellent to me. The cookies were pretty good - nice and fluffy - but they weren't as unhealthy or sweet as I would have liked. ** Note - I changed the ingredients a bit, so that might be my fault. I enjoy using splenda in place of real sugar and using low calorie ingredients.** I haven't tried any other ones yet, but i've already hit the grocery store again and picked up all of the ingredients for about 10 meals. Fingers crossed! I'll come back and edit if anything changes, but I'm hooked that this book works for the picky eater!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    This book has been a lifesaver to get my daughter to eat healthier. I was reading previous reviews abd it struck me funny that moms hate this book because its extra work. Guess what. Thats kind of a part of being a parent. The deception part stinks but when my daughter is older I am hoping she will have an open mind and love helping me with these recipes. Otherwise if you think about it when you make a cake do you tell your kids, by the way theres flour, sugar, eggs, etc in this recipe...no i do This book has been a lifesaver to get my daughter to eat healthier. I was reading previous reviews abd it struck me funny that moms hate this book because its extra work. Guess what. Thats kind of a part of being a parent. The deception part stinks but when my daughter is older I am hoping she will have an open mind and love helping me with these recipes. Otherwise if you think about it when you make a cake do you tell your kids, by the way theres flour, sugar, eggs, etc in this recipe...no i dont think i have heard anyone tell their kids that. I mean come on. Quit whining just for the sake of doing it. And just because the purees add veggies or fruits doesnt mean it is a solely vegetarian or vegan book. I mean it is a cookbook for TYPICAL families which the majority is not that. It is stuff kids eat. Another obnoxious review I read stated that she has chefs doing the book for her. Someone seems jealous that they didnt put as much time into their kids nutrition as she did. Clearly the others involved did so to consult on specific nutritional facts and measurements. In regards to what the book DOES consist of, I have tried recipes and it works. You cant taste the veggies and when no one in the family is big on the veggies it makes the whole family healthier. Seriously...what is everyone complaining about other than their own laziness or insufficiencies in the kitchen.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara ♥

    So, I read through this cookbook. I now have a list of 27 recipes that look good enough to try, all with sneaky veggie puree additives... I'm all about sneak-food. Heehee! I REALLY want to make the Oatmeal Raisin Cookies (substituting chocolate chips for the raisins, of course), and see if my husband will eat them, because they TOTALLY have ZUCCHINI in them! (No matter HOW I cook zucchini for myself, he WILL NOT eat it! So that would just serve him right.) I wonder if I could get my husband to eat So, I read through this cookbook. I now have a list of 27 recipes that look good enough to try, all with sneaky veggie puree additives... I'm all about sneak-food. Heehee! I REALLY want to make the Oatmeal Raisin Cookies (substituting chocolate chips for the raisins, of course), and see if my husband will eat them, because they TOTALLY have ZUCCHINI in them! (No matter HOW I cook zucchini for myself, he WILL NOT eat it! So that would just serve him right.) I wonder if I could get my husband to eat eggs with spinach in them, Mac and Cheese with butternut squash, or hamburgers with zucchini in them... If so, I'd consider it a HUGE success! I'm not sure how PRACTICAL making all these veggie purees is... Most of them wouldn't be TOO bad (zucchini, carrots, and other small veggies you have to steam for a few minutes first, then puree in a food processor), but the squash, you have to roast for an HOUR first, which would be more of a pain... But I'll try a couple of the recipes (I'll go with the zucchini burgers or rice balls (with sweet potato and spinach/broccoli) first, and see how it goes... I'll try and remember to report back...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carin

    I haven't tried everything yet, but most of what I've made, we've enjoyed. (Well, except the Tofu Nuggets. That was a bad experience.) These are pretty easy recipes, nothing too fancy, and she hides all kind of veggies and fruits her kids won't normally eat in the main meal so they still get what they need. Filled with tips on how to puree your foods, recipes from breakfasts through desserts, with mom tips and nutrition facts. Very fun. Now we can all eat as well as Jerry Seinfeld's family! ;) OK I haven't tried everything yet, but most of what I've made, we've enjoyed. (Well, except the Tofu Nuggets. That was a bad experience.) These are pretty easy recipes, nothing too fancy, and she hides all kind of veggies and fruits her kids won't normally eat in the main meal so they still get what they need. Filled with tips on how to puree your foods, recipes from breakfasts through desserts, with mom tips and nutrition facts. Very fun. Now we can all eat as well as Jerry Seinfeld's family! ;) OK - so a quick edit - we're finding some stinkers in with the good. Things like the "rice balls" just took way too long and weren't delicious enough for me to try again. And I think you need a special talent to cook tofu correctly.... But we're still trying new ones and editing to suit our tastes as we go along.... Further edit - I've given up for a bit. I was all excited about the puree for a while, but it takes more time than I have some days. I am craving the spinach pizzas, however....

  28. 5 out of 5

    Heather McMaster

    This is a cookbook and it is actually pretty funny and helpful! This cookbook has a theme of humor, health, and organization. This cookbook is for the reading level of those that have experience making purees. I found this cookbook interesting since it was created by Jerry Seinfeld's wife, who shares stories about her children and her recipe inspirations. The format is instructional. As a teacher, I would use this cookbook within my classroom to teach my students about cooking, as well as cultur This is a cookbook and it is actually pretty funny and helpful! This cookbook has a theme of humor, health, and organization. This cookbook is for the reading level of those that have experience making purees. I found this cookbook interesting since it was created by Jerry Seinfeld's wife, who shares stories about her children and her recipe inspirations. The format is instructional. As a teacher, I would use this cookbook within my classroom to teach my students about cooking, as well as culture. I'd have each student come up with a recipe from their particular cultural background or family recipes. Then, each student would type their recipe onto a word document, and we would compose a classroom multicultural cookbook. Every student could receive a copy of the cookbook on the last day of class, and there could be a classroom multicultural party where each student actually brings in their dish to share. Seinfeld, J. (2007). Deceptively delicious: Simple secrets to get your kids eating good foods. New York, NY: Collins.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    I grabbed this on a whim at the library. As I read through I realized that Jessica Seinfeld assumes that making purees of every vegetable (mostly squash, carrots or sweet potatoes) instantly makes a dish "healthy". Oh, look at me, so tricky and getting my kid to eat their veggies. I realize some kids are picky, but come on. As a mom, I also deal with reality and introduce my child to different foods so I do not have to spend all of my time mashing and pureeing different concoctions for her to ea I grabbed this on a whim at the library. As I read through I realized that Jessica Seinfeld assumes that making purees of every vegetable (mostly squash, carrots or sweet potatoes) instantly makes a dish "healthy". Oh, look at me, so tricky and getting my kid to eat their veggies. I realize some kids are picky, but come on. As a mom, I also deal with reality and introduce my child to different foods so I do not have to spend all of my time mashing and pureeing different concoctions for her to eat. She eats vegetables raw and cooked because she likes them, not because I tried to fool her with some trickery like a crazed kitchen elf. I thought I was being too harsh, so I made a few dishes. My kid will eat anything and even she knew they were not good. I hate saying this, I really do, but if she were not Jerry Seinfeld's wife, methinks there would be no cookbook.

  30. 5 out of 5

    MargaretAnn

    This book is deceptively ridiculous. Awhile ago my interest was peaked when I saw the author being interviewed on a talk show. I like the idea of incorporating veggies into traditional recipes for an added boost of nutrition (and I have a husband and a daughter who are both rather picky so I have no problem with deceiving them by sneaking in a green or two). . . but I didn't realize until after I bought the book (Kindle version) that the premise is not about adding whole vegetables (or even finel This book is deceptively ridiculous. Awhile ago my interest was peaked when I saw the author being interviewed on a talk show. I like the idea of incorporating veggies into traditional recipes for an added boost of nutrition (and I have a husband and a daughter who are both rather picky so I have no problem with deceiving them by sneaking in a green or two). . . but I didn't realize until after I bought the book (Kindle version) that the premise is not about adding whole vegetables (or even finely diced/shredded veggies) to meals but to steam and puree them into a mush before adding them to the dish. Not only is this extremely unappetizing, but it's very time consuming! Nobody's got time for that!

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