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Classics Illustrated is a comic book series featuring adaptations of literary classics such as Moby Dick, Hamlet, and The Iliad. Created by Albert Kanter, the series began publication in 1941 and finished its first run in 1971, producing 169 issues. Following the series' demise, various companies reprinted its titles. The first five titles were published irregularly under t Classics Illustrated is a comic book series featuring adaptations of literary classics such as Moby Dick, Hamlet, and The Iliad. Created by Albert Kanter, the series began publication in 1941 and finished its first run in 1971, producing 169 issues. Following the series' demise, various companies reprinted its titles. The first five titles were published irregularly under the banner "Classic Comics Presents" while issues six and seven were published under the banner "Classic Comics Library" with a ten-cent cover price. Arabian Nights (issue 8), illustrated by Lillian Chestney, is the first issue to use the "Classics Comics" banner. With the fourth issue, The Last of the Mohicans, in 1942, Kanter moved the operation to different offices and the corporate identity was changed to the Gilberton Company, Inc.. Reprints of previous titles began in 1943. Wartime paper shortages forced Kanter to reduce the 64-page format to 56 pages.


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Classics Illustrated is a comic book series featuring adaptations of literary classics such as Moby Dick, Hamlet, and The Iliad. Created by Albert Kanter, the series began publication in 1941 and finished its first run in 1971, producing 169 issues. Following the series' demise, various companies reprinted its titles. The first five titles were published irregularly under t Classics Illustrated is a comic book series featuring adaptations of literary classics such as Moby Dick, Hamlet, and The Iliad. Created by Albert Kanter, the series began publication in 1941 and finished its first run in 1971, producing 169 issues. Following the series' demise, various companies reprinted its titles. The first five titles were published irregularly under the banner "Classic Comics Presents" while issues six and seven were published under the banner "Classic Comics Library" with a ten-cent cover price. Arabian Nights (issue 8), illustrated by Lillian Chestney, is the first issue to use the "Classics Comics" banner. With the fourth issue, The Last of the Mohicans, in 1942, Kanter moved the operation to different offices and the corporate identity was changed to the Gilberton Company, Inc.. Reprints of previous titles began in 1943. Wartime paper shortages forced Kanter to reduce the 64-page format to 56 pages.

30 review for The Three Musketeers

  1. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    This book was the first numbered item in the series of classic works of literature adapted to comic form. Since the subject is a classic and generally lengthy, the comic version is by necessity abridged, with the potential for some loss of significant content. In this case, the essence of the story is preserved. Like many classic works of literature, some knowledge of the historical context is helpful in understanding the backdrop. It is set in the time of Cardinal Richelieu, or the first half This book was the first numbered item in the series of classic works of literature adapted to comic form. Since the subject is a classic and generally lengthy, the comic version is by necessity abridged, with the potential for some loss of significant content. In this case, the essence of the story is preserved. Like many classic works of literature, some knowledge of the historical context is helpful in understanding the backdrop. It is set in the time of Cardinal Richelieu, or the first half of the seventeenth century. It was a time of almost constant war for the French nation, and this story reflects the conflict, with the heroes eagerly joining in the fight. It is interesting that the term “musketeer” is used to refer to a soldier that packs a musket, yet the heroes of this work are generally depicted as fighting with swords. “The Three Musketeers” is a book that nearly everyone has heard of, but only a small percentage has read. Hopefully, the publication of this comic served to generate sufficient interest so that several readers went on to read the book. I have long been of the opinion that anything that advances the process of education should be encouraged and never ridiculed. The publication and reading of educational comics like this is therefore something to be encouraged.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Liam

    One can see why modern film adaptations tend to be tongue-in-cheek given the air of frivolity that permeates Dumas' novel, at least in the translation I read. The cockiness of the musketeers while amusing, such as when they insist on finishing their breakfast even as the enemy detachment advances upon their position, but does not make them sympathetic enough to the reader. Meanwhile, D'Artagnan is positively repellent: too easily offended and swift to violence: he could almost resemble the kind One can see why modern film adaptations tend to be tongue-in-cheek given the air of frivolity that permeates Dumas' novel, at least in the translation I read. The cockiness of the musketeers while amusing, such as when they insist on finishing their breakfast even as the enemy detachment advances upon their position, but does not make them sympathetic enough to the reader. Meanwhile, D'Artagnan is positively repellent: too easily offended and swift to violence: he could almost resemble the kind of over-sensitive knife-wielding misfit of our times. Life is cheap in the France of Dumas as each eagerly-embraced brawl ends with unlamented death. then again, the musketeers inhabit a dangerous and fractious world in which their country is characterised by the barely concealed enmity of King and Cardinal whose respective armies are never far from replicating the hostility of their masters out on the streets. The Three Musketeers is accessible and fun but as such is a piece of longwinded whimsy that fails to quite pack the punch of a classic.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    Not exactly as romantic or adventurous as I'd like.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Meriem Guenoun

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. **The war .ended one more time, the four friends met to give their toast All for one, one for all!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    H - 9 enjoyed it more than I did.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Not exactly as romantic or adventurous as I'd like.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mindy Diamond

    wasnt so easy to follow if you don't know the story from before

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ufulu Masango

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mathieu

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Hoffman

  11. 5 out of 5

    elizabeth clausen

  12. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fanni

  14. 5 out of 5

    Haydee Cabalquinto

  15. 4 out of 5

    Danilo Filippo

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stefana Vutova

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Gabrielse

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eddard

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Springer

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Burgess

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vaskø Uchīhā

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nair

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Huggins

  24. 5 out of 5

    DeeDee 3kk

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nikoline Wiedemann

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ricardo Rivera

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sjöfn Yngvadóttir

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