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From the PEN/Faulkner Award-winning author James Salter and his wife, Kay, amateur chefs and perfect hosts, here is a charming, beautifully illustrated tour de table: a food lover's companion that, with an entry for each day of the year, takes us from a Twelfth Night cake in January to a champagne dinner on New Year's Eve. Life Is Meals is rich with culinary wisdom, histor From the PEN/Faulkner Award-winning author James Salter and his wife, Kay, amateur chefs and perfect hosts, here is a charming, beautifully illustrated tour de table: a food lover's companion that, with an entry for each day of the year, takes us from a Twelfth Night cake in January to a champagne dinner on New Year's Eve. Life Is Meals is rich with culinary wisdom, history, recipes, literary pleasures, and the authors' own memories of successes and catastrophes.For instance: The menu on the Titanic on the fatal night? Reflections on dining from Queen Victoria, JFK, Winnie-the-Pooh, Garrison Keillor, and many others? The seductiveness of a velvety Brie or the perfect martini? How to decide whom to invite to a dinner party?and whom not to? John Irving's family recipe for meatballs; Balzac's love of coffee? The greatest dinner ever given at the White House? Where in Paris Samuel Beckett and Harold Pinter had French onion soup at 4:00 a.m.? How to cope with acts of God and man-made disasters in the kitchenSophisticated as well as practical, opinionated, and indispensable, Life Is Meals is a tribute to the glory of food and drink, and the joy of sharing them with others. "The meal is the emblem of civilization," the Salters observe. "What would one know of life as it should be lived, or nights as they should be spent, apart from meals?"


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From the PEN/Faulkner Award-winning author James Salter and his wife, Kay, amateur chefs and perfect hosts, here is a charming, beautifully illustrated tour de table: a food lover's companion that, with an entry for each day of the year, takes us from a Twelfth Night cake in January to a champagne dinner on New Year's Eve. Life Is Meals is rich with culinary wisdom, histor From the PEN/Faulkner Award-winning author James Salter and his wife, Kay, amateur chefs and perfect hosts, here is a charming, beautifully illustrated tour de table: a food lover's companion that, with an entry for each day of the year, takes us from a Twelfth Night cake in January to a champagne dinner on New Year's Eve. Life Is Meals is rich with culinary wisdom, history, recipes, literary pleasures, and the authors' own memories of successes and catastrophes.For instance: The menu on the Titanic on the fatal night? Reflections on dining from Queen Victoria, JFK, Winnie-the-Pooh, Garrison Keillor, and many others? The seductiveness of a velvety Brie or the perfect martini? How to decide whom to invite to a dinner party?and whom not to? John Irving's family recipe for meatballs; Balzac's love of coffee? The greatest dinner ever given at the White House? Where in Paris Samuel Beckett and Harold Pinter had French onion soup at 4:00 a.m.? How to cope with acts of God and man-made disasters in the kitchenSophisticated as well as practical, opinionated, and indispensable, Life Is Meals is a tribute to the glory of food and drink, and the joy of sharing them with others. "The meal is the emblem of civilization," the Salters observe. "What would one know of life as it should be lived, or nights as they should be spent, apart from meals?"

30 review for Life Is Meals: A Food Lover's Book of Days

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    With an entry for each day of the year, I will be reading this daily style, savoring each entry like a good meal. I sent this book to a friend that loves to cook and who takes joy in the process in hopes that we both can share some conversation this coming year over the love of food. I will not post everyday but may share thoughts on what I'm reading now and then. January 1st speaks to how much of our lives celebrations revolve around food. "It is a habitual ceremony" When I first decided to lose With an entry for each day of the year, I will be reading this daily style, savoring each entry like a good meal. I sent this book to a friend that loves to cook and who takes joy in the process in hopes that we both can share some conversation this coming year over the love of food. I will not post everyday but may share thoughts on what I'm reading now and then. January 1st speaks to how much of our lives celebrations revolve around food. "It is a habitual ceremony" When I first decided to lose weight many years ago I bemoaned the fact that you had to eat unlike giving up other bad habits. I lost the joy of celebratory food. This reminds me well that many of the best days in life are those meals that signify an event be it wedding, christening, holiday and even the repast of death. January 2nd talks about The Jules Verne restaurant and The Eiffel Tower. What a special place to share a meal. Lucky those who have... May 29, 2014 Though I have continued to read this it hasn't proved to be quite the book I thought it would be. I was looking for a more personal narrative of food related stories. The book is entertaining. It is what it is and for what it is, it is fine. I will not be adding to this review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eva Gogola

    I wish I could give this book a hundred and five stars. Cover to cover, it was one of my favorite books. First, you can't go wrong with the subject: food. The authors are married, adorably in love and very knowledgeable about meals. The book reads in short spurts, one or two passages for each day of the year. Some days cover history, others recipes and yet other personal anecdotes. Every day, every month, is a delight to read. It made me interested in wine for the first time in my life. The book I wish I could give this book a hundred and five stars. Cover to cover, it was one of my favorite books. First, you can't go wrong with the subject: food. The authors are married, adorably in love and very knowledgeable about meals. The book reads in short spurts, one or two passages for each day of the year. Some days cover history, others recipes and yet other personal anecdotes. Every day, every month, is a delight to read. It made me interested in wine for the first time in my life. The book also contains a thorough index and lovely illustrations. This is a book that I would definitely want to have in my personal library. The only downside to this book is that I was constantly hungry. Even so, I found myself more inspired to explore, make and share food.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tuck

    james salter is a brilliant novelist, and this book of days (of food) is a selection he and his wife kay salter have collected and written of the many years of married life, in aspen and long island, and paris, cooking, eating, dinner parties given and attended, romantic meals in restaurantes etc. but frankly the "facts" are fuzzy and the recipes are mostly taken from others and not so unique. the illustrations though are super, and the book was designed and made by callaway, so the physical boo james salter is a brilliant novelist, and this book of days (of food) is a selection he and his wife kay salter have collected and written of the many years of married life, in aspen and long island, and paris, cooking, eating, dinner parties given and attended, romantic meals in restaurantes etc. but frankly the "facts" are fuzzy and the recipes are mostly taken from others and not so unique. the illustrations though are super, and the book was designed and made by callaway, so the physical book is a treasure,and fabrice moireau is a genius who can say more in a teeny tiny portrait of a french breadshop than salters can in chapters on bread. so 5 stars for the book. 2 or so for the contents. if one is interested in more substantial and accurate foodie books see larry osborne The Accidental Connoisseur: An Irreverent Journey Through the Wine World and steingarten It Must've Been Something I Ate: The Return of the Man Who Ate Everything and buford Heat: An Amateur's Adventures as Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta-Maker, and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany and leave j salter to his fictions All That Is

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    Not for me, but if you're a rich entertainer who loves caviar and high-dollar champagne, by all means. Not for me, but if you're a rich entertainer who loves caviar and high-dollar champagne, by all means.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    It was the illustrator of Life is Meals that led me to the book. I'm a big fan of the watercolor work of Fabrice Moireau, who's illustrated several gorgeous sketchbooks of major cities, various regions of France, and other exotic locations. In this book, Moireau seems to have had his hands tied a bit. The illustrations are small---little, precise cameos scattered through the text. Still, I love anything Moireau does and this book is no exception. I had not read James Salter before and I'm very g It was the illustrator of Life is Meals that led me to the book. I'm a big fan of the watercolor work of Fabrice Moireau, who's illustrated several gorgeous sketchbooks of major cities, various regions of France, and other exotic locations. In this book, Moireau seems to have had his hands tied a bit. The illustrations are small---little, precise cameos scattered through the text. Still, I love anything Moireau does and this book is no exception. I had not read James Salter before and I'm very glad to have been introduced to his crisp, clear writing. I started reading this book in the normal way, page after page. I now dip into it from time to time, to see what Salter has to say on any given day. (Today's entry is on the illustrious chef Auguste Escoffier.) This is a delightful book-- always informative, often witty, well written, and beautifully, if sparsely and quietly, illustrated.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Though this would've been the perfect "snack" book -- pick it up and have a bite now and then -- I treated it like Thanksgiving, gorging myself. I learned a ton of random food and drink trivia, marked some recipes to try and really, really wished James and Kay were in my inner circle. Their attitude toward food -- hell, toward life -- is exactly the philosophy I'm embracing these days. I plan to liberally quote, cook and loan. Though this would've been the perfect "snack" book -- pick it up and have a bite now and then -- I treated it like Thanksgiving, gorging myself. I learned a ton of random food and drink trivia, marked some recipes to try and really, really wished James and Kay were in my inner circle. Their attitude toward food -- hell, toward life -- is exactly the philosophy I'm embracing these days. I plan to liberally quote, cook and loan.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Noah

    Considering that I will happily eat leftovers out of my hand over the sink if nobody's watching, I'm probably not this book's target audience, but I really enjoyed it. The whole book is a love letter to a life spent richly experiencing food and it's charming throughout, with individual entries ranging from ancient history to useful advice to personal memories. Highly recommended. Considering that I will happily eat leftovers out of my hand over the sink if nobody's watching, I'm probably not this book's target audience, but I really enjoyed it. The whole book is a love letter to a life spent richly experiencing food and it's charming throughout, with individual entries ranging from ancient history to useful advice to personal memories. Highly recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melissa (LifeFullyBooked)

    Interesting book with short vignettes for each day of the year about food, meals, and different people. I learned so much from this book!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

    I stumbled on this at a used bookstore and when I was checking out, the proprietor was raving about James Salter. Which was funny, because I picked the book for the subject and format – I had never heard of Salter! He’s known for his novels, apparently, but he and his wife, a journalist and playwright, are also great lovers of food (and the travel that often accompanies that love). Life is Meals is a year-long journey of recipes, food facts, food history and personal memories. I’d give a huge port I stumbled on this at a used bookstore and when I was checking out, the proprietor was raving about James Salter. Which was funny, because I picked the book for the subject and format – I had never heard of Salter! He’s known for his novels, apparently, but he and his wife, a journalist and playwright, are also great lovers of food (and the travel that often accompanies that love). Life is Meals is a year-long journey of recipes, food facts, food history and personal memories. I’d give a huge portion of them five stars. I loved learning where certain recipes or meals came from, how a particular cheese is made or the history behind some dinner tradition. I was less interested in personal recollections of meals with the famous, the love lives of world-renowned chefs or the entries on wines, which I buy infrequently. But no day’s entry is longer than a page or so. If you find yourself mildly uninterested in a few, here and there, it’s still no burden to breeze through them. I knew from the introduction that the Salters were my people: “We put the book together not to be definitive but rather to appeal to those for whom eating is something more than a mere necessity. It’s not meant to replace favorite cookbooks but instead, in a way, to complement them, to give them further context and, in the course of doing it, to give a year, perhaps more, of pleasure.” I loved this January 16 advice, in an entry about giving dinner parties: “Tidy the bathroom guests will use, clear clutter, and let it go at that. Devote yourself instead to the elements that will actually be memorable: the food and the conversation.” (Actually, the whole dinner-party series of entries was pretty delightful and genuinely helpful.) There are rules for houseguests and for waiters and for bakers. You can read about the freshness of fish and avocados and bread, alongside the eating habits of famous authors, actors and world leaders. An April entry on manners admits that table rules change with time. “The true mark of courtesy is for the host or hostess to casually commit the same mistake as the guest to show that it is perfectly all right. The opposite of this once took place at the White House after lunch when President Calvin Coolidge, a taciturn man, put some milk into his coffee and slowly poured it into his saucer. His guest politely imitated him. Then Coolidge reached down and put the saucer on the floor for the cat.” Under the April 20 entry, “John Irving,” I wrote “I love everything about this.” I discovered my daughter was born the same day as legendary chef Alice Waters. I learned chef’s jackets are double-breasted so they can be “buttoned either way to hide stains.” (Why aren’t all my clothes double-breasted??) I put stars all around an Elspeth Huxley quote in an October entry: “You cannot sell a blemished apple in the supermarket, but you can sell a tasteless one, provided it is shiny, smooth, even, uniform, and bright.” I don’t do a lot of books that are designed to be read in tiny bits through a full year, but I’m glad I enjoyed this one that way, instead of plowing straight through it. My daily two or three minutes with the Salters were something to look forward to. And here’s the thing, flipping back through the book to write this, remembering all I loved about it, the few entries that didn’t put me over the moon don’t seem like that big of a deal. If you love food and travel and interesting people, you’re going to enjoy this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chef

    The promise of this book, at least according to the foreword, was exciting: a journal of meals, shared by a couple (one of whom wrote the excellent A Sport and a Pastime), and the anecdotes that emerged from each. The reality of this book is less than exciting: a calendar of birthdays, death days, and loosely threaded connections to people within the world of food. There are also some scatterings of personal travels, but all are Euro-centric and bourgeois (oh, yes, pleeeeease do regale us with an The promise of this book, at least according to the foreword, was exciting: a journal of meals, shared by a couple (one of whom wrote the excellent A Sport and a Pastime), and the anecdotes that emerged from each. The reality of this book is less than exciting: a calendar of birthdays, death days, and loosely threaded connections to people within the world of food. There are also some scatterings of personal travels, but all are Euro-centric and bourgeois (oh, yes, pleeeeease do regale us with another tale of dining in Paris!). There is also wine. So much of it. Too much of it. The most bothersome part of the book, however, isn't the construction. It's the food history, which is largely a whitewashed one. One day out of the 365 (one!) is dedicated to a broad generalization of Indian cuisine. Africa and Mexico are usually only mentioned in the context of European explorers. Very few (if any?) of the recipes come from a cuisine that doesn't have origins in Europe or America. If life is meals, but those meals are myopic, how rich, truly, is that life?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    This is a great concept and collection authored by the esteemed writers James Salter and his wife Kay (Eldredge). It originated conceptually from their own "dinner book" of keeping track of meals they prepared and hosted in their Aspen home. That evolved from simple meal lists and tweaked recipes to include anecdotes, reflections on the guests, commentary on the occasion and all manner of personal record to become quite a family keepsake. That in itself is a great idea - if I entertained more or This is a great concept and collection authored by the esteemed writers James Salter and his wife Kay (Eldredge). It originated conceptually from their own "dinner book" of keeping track of meals they prepared and hosted in their Aspen home. That evolved from simple meal lists and tweaked recipes to include anecdotes, reflections on the guests, commentary on the occasion and all manner of personal record to become quite a family keepsake. That in itself is a great idea - if I entertained more or rubbed elbows with famous people regularly. This edition is more generic, though it includes some stories unique to their family (the birth of their son and rubbing his lips with wine, friends who reciprocated recipes, travel food, etc) but here each day includes a short entry on the history of a food, a famous dinner party, literary or historical figure, a tried and true recipe or etiquette tip. Not a cover to cover read, but a great resource/gift/entertainment for a bookish foodie fan.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karla

    I love the premise of “Life is Meals” but for me, it fell short. I found that I marked several pages to reference back to but overall it was written so historically and especially European history with a strong emphasis on France and French history, that I skimmed those parts. The Salter’s are living a very interesting life and are world travelers, meeting interesting people and eating interesting food. I am an everyday cook and I think this book is for true gourmet chefs. The Salter’s fall into I love the premise of “Life is Meals” but for me, it fell short. I found that I marked several pages to reference back to but overall it was written so historically and especially European history with a strong emphasis on France and French history, that I skimmed those parts. The Salter’s are living a very interesting life and are world travelers, meeting interesting people and eating interesting food. I am an everyday cook and I think this book is for true gourmet chefs. The Salter’s fall into this category - and what hosts they must be!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I loved reading this every morning. I put this next to the microwave and tried to read the small excerpt every morning. I would love if Jasen and I kept a journal like this of meals shared with friends, conversations we’ve had, recipes that worked or didn’t work, history of food, wine. It was a lot of fun. Good gift idea for a foodie. There weren’t a ton of recipes I’d actually try but the recipes were such a small part of this book that I didn’t mind. I do plan on trying one or two, though!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    due back at library before I could finish it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    One of my favorite food books ever. The authors take disparate subjects around food and weave them all together into one magical whole that inspires and connects.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    Interesting read, though some of their "facts" are incorrect. Interesting read, though some of their "facts" are incorrect.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Catrien Deys

    Just great fun and some info that was really new to me.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Deb cambria

    I'm reading it day by day. It's superb. Great gift for a foodie I'm reading it day by day. It's superb. Great gift for a foodie

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ritattoo

    Interesting facts but somehow boringly written

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ionut

    I know James Salter for his other books that center around strong male and female characters (The Hunters, All that is, etc). He once wrote in a piece for Esquire magazine called "Younger Women, Older Men" that: "man’s dream and ambition is to have women, as a cat’s is to catch birds, but this is something that must be restrained". A lot of his previous work can be captured with that phrase. This book is completely different and that is one of the reasons I found it interesting. It is authored b I know James Salter for his other books that center around strong male and female characters (The Hunters, All that is, etc). He once wrote in a piece for Esquire magazine called "Younger Women, Older Men" that: "man’s dream and ambition is to have women, as a cat’s is to catch birds, but this is something that must be restrained". A lot of his previous work can be captured with that phrase. This book is completely different and that is one of the reasons I found it interesting. It is authored by James and his wife Kay and it is a collection of recipes, anecdotes, funny moments that took place at the parties they hosted, and historical pieces centered around meals and food. James and Kay met when he was in his 50s and she was in her 30s and that event is captured in this book "The man across the table from me was everything. I was young and still too inexperienced to be a decent conversationalist. We talked about Europe which he knew intimately - Rome, Paris, London, Barcelona - a world I had seen bits of on a student tour and I longed to know. It was the first of thousands - at home, abroad, in elegant restaurants and unforgettable dives. A lifetime of meals. He's always said that conversation - and so much of it takes place at the table - is the essence of a shared life. I learned to talk". James and Kay lived at a time when women were often enough typecast into certain types of jobs. At the same time it was a period that shaped american cooking and american understanding of certain foods and drinks. So it's no wonder that some of the most important pioneers of that period such as Julia Child, Irma Rombauer, MFK Fisher were women and made their way into this book. Overall, the book is a light and interesting read and I will keep it as a reference for certain recipes.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

    As a person not accustomed to reading books about foodies, this was a new experience. The authors know quite a deal about the history of food, particularly pertaining to French cuisine, as well as other European countries. If you want to know about different types of wine, and about possibly different restaurants to dine at in France, this book is a good reference. It also has a collection of recipes to make some foods connected to historical figures or events. The book is supposed to be read on As a person not accustomed to reading books about foodies, this was a new experience. The authors know quite a deal about the history of food, particularly pertaining to French cuisine, as well as other European countries. If you want to know about different types of wine, and about possibly different restaurants to dine at in France, this book is a good reference. It also has a collection of recipes to make some foods connected to historical figures or events. The book is supposed to be read on one day for all 365 days in a year, but reading it all at once is equally enjoyable, at least for me. Be prepared to get a ton of unfamiliar information thrown at you, unless you, unlike me, are more educated when it comes to the historical aspects of food. The only thing I disliked about this book is it randomly tells the reader the ending to Anna Karenina. I think books shouldn't give away endings or important events in other books, especially such a well known novel as Anna Karenina. They should have given some sort of "spoiler alert" to the reader, in my opinion. Otherwise, this is quite a fascinating book when it comes to learning about the history of food, and how the authors figured this out for themselves in their own lives.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jason Bergman

    This book is really just a series of anecdotes more or less related to food, organized like a calendar, one per day for an entire year. It reads a bit like a dinner conversation with the most interesting guests in the world. Some of the bits are better than others, but on the whole, they're quite good. It makes for an unusual book to read start to finish, but I was captivated. Most sections are authored by both James and Kay (herself an accomplished writer) but there are several that are signed This book is really just a series of anecdotes more or less related to food, organized like a calendar, one per day for an entire year. It reads a bit like a dinner conversation with the most interesting guests in the world. Some of the bits are better than others, but on the whole, they're quite good. It makes for an unusual book to read start to finish, but I was captivated. Most sections are authored by both James and Kay (herself an accomplished writer) but there are several that are signed J.S. or K.S. James Salter was probably the greatest wordsmith alive for much of his life, but his minimalist, pointed prose isn't to be found here. This is a much more conversational tone, even in the sections specifically attributed to him. It's a weird book, but a good one. I share the Salters' love for fresh, simply prepared food, and also their love of travel, so this was pretty much in my wheelhouse. I even made one of the recipes in this book (the spaghetti carbonara) and it was indeed quite good. I recommend this for the foodie in your life.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Peggy Lo

    I'm up to April in this book. It has beautiful watercolors and is a nice mix of stories, random facts about food/cooks, and a few recipes here and there. There are also these beautiful watercolor illustrations that complement the book really well. I like the idea that they put out in the beginning of the book- the idea of having a family cookbook of sorts where you add in your favorite recipes and make notes on the margins about who liked what and any changes to the recipe that made it better. Yo I'm up to April in this book. It has beautiful watercolors and is a nice mix of stories, random facts about food/cooks, and a few recipes here and there. There are also these beautiful watercolor illustrations that complement the book really well. I like the idea that they put out in the beginning of the book- the idea of having a family cookbook of sorts where you add in your favorite recipes and make notes on the margins about who liked what and any changes to the recipe that made it better. You can also make notes about dinner parties in the back- particularly good or interesting or bad pairings. It makes me want to throw dinner parties! but i think i love the illustrations more than the content...i got tired of it after a while

  24. 4 out of 5

    Georgie

    I really enjoyed this book. There's an entry for each day of the year . The entries are all connected with food - the history of various dishes and ingredients, various historical figures connected with food (chefs and people who were known for their love of eating), food in different cultures and countries, seasonal traditions connected with food, and, my personal favourite, the authors' own memories and experiences of food which they've cooked and eaten at home, together, for dinner parties th I really enjoyed this book. There's an entry for each day of the year . The entries are all connected with food - the history of various dishes and ingredients, various historical figures connected with food (chefs and people who were known for their love of eating), food in different cultures and countries, seasonal traditions connected with food, and, my personal favourite, the authors' own memories and experiences of food which they've cooked and eaten at home, together, for dinner parties they've thrown or at dinners at friends' homes. There were some of their favourite recipes too. Every single entry was interesting and/or entertaining. Nice illustrations as well. The only downside? At points it made me very hungry!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    A few bits were interesting. I liked learning more about the difference between the various colors of peppercorns, and info about which fruits ripen after they are picked and which don't. It was mildly interesting reading about famous people and their relationship with food. But mostly, it was irritating. I do not care for food, it's purpose is to sustain life and meet emotional needs LOL. So their fixation with food was incomprehensible to me, plus it is amazing how much inappropriate content t A few bits were interesting. I liked learning more about the difference between the various colors of peppercorns, and info about which fruits ripen after they are picked and which don't. It was mildly interesting reading about famous people and their relationship with food. But mostly, it was irritating. I do not care for food, it's purpose is to sustain life and meet emotional needs LOL. So their fixation with food was incomprehensible to me, plus it is amazing how much inappropriate content they were able to shove into their anecdotes. And the alcohol! my gosh, haven't they ever heard of water or milk!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

    I loved this book. A gorgeous cover and beautiful accompanying illustrations for the text. While the flow from subject to subject had little context, most every item is supremely interesting and added to my overall enjoyment and appreciation of this read. I would love to own this book but not sure how many times I would actually reread it so something perhaps to be borrowed from the library in future. Certainly something to give as a gift for a hostess or fellow food lover. A most excellent gem I loved this book. A gorgeous cover and beautiful accompanying illustrations for the text. While the flow from subject to subject had little context, most every item is supremely interesting and added to my overall enjoyment and appreciation of this read. I would love to own this book but not sure how many times I would actually reread it so something perhaps to be borrowed from the library in future. Certainly something to give as a gift for a hostess or fellow food lover. A most excellent gem of a gift.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessi

    "The meal is the essential act of life. It is the habitual ceremony, the long record of marriage, the school for behavior, the prelude to love. Among all peoples and in all times, every significant event in life - be it wedding, triumph, or birth - is marked by a meal or the sharing of food and drink. The meal is the emblem of civilization. What would one know of life as it should be lived or nights as they should be spent apart from meals?" - Life is Meals "The meal is the essential act of life. It is the habitual ceremony, the long record of marriage, the school for behavior, the prelude to love. Among all peoples and in all times, every significant event in life - be it wedding, triumph, or birth - is marked by a meal or the sharing of food and drink. The meal is the emblem of civilization. What would one know of life as it should be lived or nights as they should be spent apart from meals?" - Life is Meals

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    It's sweet, and cute, and some of the information, fascinating (the risotto recipe is good, and simple enough to remember), but I kept being a little creeped out by how Jim is consistenly cast as the older-and-wiser of the two of them, and Kay is always the one in need of teaching. They've been married, like, thirty years, and that's one hell of a power imbalance to live with for thirty years. ::judges:: MY PRECONCEPTIONS, LET ME SHOW YOU THEM. It's sweet, and cute, and some of the information, fascinating (the risotto recipe is good, and simple enough to remember), but I kept being a little creeped out by how Jim is consistenly cast as the older-and-wiser of the two of them, and Kay is always the one in need of teaching. They've been married, like, thirty years, and that's one hell of a power imbalance to live with for thirty years. ::judges:: MY PRECONCEPTIONS, LET ME SHOW YOU THEM.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    I had high hopes for this book--I generally enjoy these types of books where there is a short entry for each day--kind of like a journal. However, I had to look at the date of publication to determine whether this one was written in the 1970's or earlier. It was a bit outdated and the authors' have the opinion that there is NO red wine that goes with chocolate. I should have stopped reading it at that point--ALL red wine goes with chocolate. I had high hopes for this book--I generally enjoy these types of books where there is a short entry for each day--kind of like a journal. However, I had to look at the date of publication to determine whether this one was written in the 1970's or earlier. It was a bit outdated and the authors' have the opinion that there is NO red wine that goes with chocolate. I should have stopped reading it at that point--ALL red wine goes with chocolate.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dmalosh

    Though the thought of reading only the corresponding chapter each day is charming, it'd be a bit like having only one bite of dessert and then pushing the plate away. The concept appealed to me for roughly 2 days. Now I save a week's worth for one sitting which is more akin to having a full meal. This is a great read for any lover of food. Though the thought of reading only the corresponding chapter each day is charming, it'd be a bit like having only one bite of dessert and then pushing the plate away. The concept appealed to me for roughly 2 days. Now I save a week's worth for one sitting which is more akin to having a full meal. This is a great read for any lover of food.

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