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Inside Putin's Russia: Can There Be Reform Without Democracy?

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International views of Russia have changed drastically in the last decade, due in part to the leadership of the decidedly pro-Western President Yeltsin. It was not without concern that we saw the next elected leader pulled from the ranks of the former KGB. Andrew Jack, former Moscow bureau chief for the Financial Times, uses in-depth research and years of journalistic exp International views of Russia have changed drastically in the last decade, due in part to the leadership of the decidedly pro-Western President Yeltsin. It was not without concern that we saw the next elected leader pulled from the ranks of the former KGB. Andrew Jack, former Moscow bureau chief for the Financial Times, uses in-depth research and years of journalistic experience to bring us the first full picture of Vladimir Putin. Jack describes how Putin grew to become the most powerful man in Russia, defying domestic and foreign expectations and presiding over a period of strong economic growth, significant restructuring, and rising international prestige. Despite criticism of his handling of the war in Chechnya and of the controls he introduced on parliament and the media, Putin has united Russian society and maintained extraordinarily high popularity. Inside Putin's Russia digs behind the rumors and speculation, illuminating Putin's character and the changing nature of the Russia he leads. It highlights some of the more troubling trends as he consolidates his leadership during a second presidential term marred by the Beslan tragedy, the attacks on Yukos and Russian policy towards Ukraine. Now with a new Epilogue by the author, this invaluable book offers important insights for anyone interested in the past, present, and future of Russia.


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International views of Russia have changed drastically in the last decade, due in part to the leadership of the decidedly pro-Western President Yeltsin. It was not without concern that we saw the next elected leader pulled from the ranks of the former KGB. Andrew Jack, former Moscow bureau chief for the Financial Times, uses in-depth research and years of journalistic exp International views of Russia have changed drastically in the last decade, due in part to the leadership of the decidedly pro-Western President Yeltsin. It was not without concern that we saw the next elected leader pulled from the ranks of the former KGB. Andrew Jack, former Moscow bureau chief for the Financial Times, uses in-depth research and years of journalistic experience to bring us the first full picture of Vladimir Putin. Jack describes how Putin grew to become the most powerful man in Russia, defying domestic and foreign expectations and presiding over a period of strong economic growth, significant restructuring, and rising international prestige. Despite criticism of his handling of the war in Chechnya and of the controls he introduced on parliament and the media, Putin has united Russian society and maintained extraordinarily high popularity. Inside Putin's Russia digs behind the rumors and speculation, illuminating Putin's character and the changing nature of the Russia he leads. It highlights some of the more troubling trends as he consolidates his leadership during a second presidential term marred by the Beslan tragedy, the attacks on Yukos and Russian policy towards Ukraine. Now with a new Epilogue by the author, this invaluable book offers important insights for anyone interested in the past, present, and future of Russia.

30 review for Inside Putin's Russia: Can There Be Reform Without Democracy?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Velika

    A thick and very detailed, somewhat interesting, often stale account of Putin's rise. I got a fair bit out of the section about the Chechen/Russia concflict and the way the government, mostly Putin (seeing as the book was all about him and his ideas) went about that, and there were some other interesting stories about how the immense privitisation worked after the USSR. Then it got bogged down in a fairly wordy, repeatative and confusing detail in describing the so called 'rise of the Oligarchs' A thick and very detailed, somewhat interesting, often stale account of Putin's rise. I got a fair bit out of the section about the Chechen/Russia concflict and the way the government, mostly Putin (seeing as the book was all about him and his ideas) went about that, and there were some other interesting stories about how the immense privitisation worked after the USSR. Then it got bogged down in a fairly wordy, repeatative and confusing detail in describing the so called 'rise of the Oligarchs' and how the government was going about influencing or controlling the media. It was also a bit too full of the usual stereotypes people trot out about the 'Russian people' and what they like in their leaders (being ruled by an iron fist it would seem...can't get enough of it) which were offensive. Before I got any further I realised the book was very overdue and I wasn't so interested in finishing it. 2 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Denise DeRocher

    Excellent overall - better know some Russian history, politics as well as its economic structures before and after the Fall (so to speak). I taught a class called The USSR: History and Politics back in the Dark Ages, so was well prepared for this read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Auh2o 1964

    Author is a bit of a russophile.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Arctic

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carl-adam

  6. 4 out of 5

    AnnaBella

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zumrad

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Matthews

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schrad

  12. 4 out of 5

    Myriam

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maryum Alam

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steven

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eugene

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ben Frayle

  20. 5 out of 5

    James Oakes

  21. 5 out of 5

    Olga

  22. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Igor Seprak

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dan Bishop

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  26. 5 out of 5

    Noah

  27. 4 out of 5

    Owen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Henry

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Ducluzeau

    3.5 - quite good. However overly broad. Could have drawn a better comparison between Putin and De Gaulle (it was apparent that it was missing). Definitely knows his stuff, but also shows his Western bias through his choice of language

  30. 4 out of 5

    Richard

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