counter create hit Making Friends With Black People - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Making Friends With Black People

Availability: Ready to download

White people of America, we know you've got it rough. Sure, black men and women have been through four hundred years of slavery, oppression, murder, and watching white college students try to dance. But now that it's hip to have black friends, white people aren't sure how to go about it. And that is a real American tragedy. Thank God Nick Adams is here to help you avoid p White people of America, we know you've got it rough. Sure, black men and women have been through four hundred years of slavery, oppression, murder, and watching white college students try to dance. But now that it's hip to have black friends, white people aren't sure how to go about it. And that is a real American tragedy. Thank God Nick Adams is here to help you avoid potential racial pitfalls and successfully make the transition from white to "aiight." Now, you'll know not to start a conversation with, "So, that new Jay-Z album is pretty great, right?" Or tell a co-worker he looks just like (fill in blank with name of dark-skinned person who works in the other building.) You'll know that a lot of black people you meet at parties or work functions don't care who played Thelma's husband on "Good Times," don't want to discuss the Malcolm X biography you just read and definitely don't want to listen to country music. Ever. Yes, it's a good thing Nick is here to explain. Because if we're going to live together in peace and harmony, you people are going to need help. Black People, Briefly Explained. A Q&A with Nick Adams Q: Nick, what is the correct term to use when addressing my new friends: Black or African-American? A: Personally, I always liked Afro-American. I liked being named after a 1970's hairdo. But then I wondered why we didn't become the Jheri-curled Americans or High Top Fade Americans. Q: Nick, if black people can use the "N" word as a term of endearment, can I, a white person, do so? A: No. I don't care if you have your hair in cornrows while wearing a Phat Farm t-shirt at an R. Kelly concert. Black people don't get to be president, and white people don't get to use the word nigger. Can we just call it even now? Q: Nick, I'd like to try slang. Is that okay? A: When you guys start using our words, that's when we know it's time for us to stop using them. Every time a white, middle-aged math teacher calls a student, "dog," black people all over the country are notified via email. Believe it. Q: Nick, surely you have to agree that Eminem is a hip-hop visionary? A: Let's try this one more time: Kurtis Blow, RUN-DMC, LL Cool J, Rakim, Chuck D, KRS-One, Tupac, Notorious B.I.G., Nas, Common, Mos Def, Bitch!


Compare
Ads Banner

White people of America, we know you've got it rough. Sure, black men and women have been through four hundred years of slavery, oppression, murder, and watching white college students try to dance. But now that it's hip to have black friends, white people aren't sure how to go about it. And that is a real American tragedy. Thank God Nick Adams is here to help you avoid p White people of America, we know you've got it rough. Sure, black men and women have been through four hundred years of slavery, oppression, murder, and watching white college students try to dance. But now that it's hip to have black friends, white people aren't sure how to go about it. And that is a real American tragedy. Thank God Nick Adams is here to help you avoid potential racial pitfalls and successfully make the transition from white to "aiight." Now, you'll know not to start a conversation with, "So, that new Jay-Z album is pretty great, right?" Or tell a co-worker he looks just like (fill in blank with name of dark-skinned person who works in the other building.) You'll know that a lot of black people you meet at parties or work functions don't care who played Thelma's husband on "Good Times," don't want to discuss the Malcolm X biography you just read and definitely don't want to listen to country music. Ever. Yes, it's a good thing Nick is here to explain. Because if we're going to live together in peace and harmony, you people are going to need help. Black People, Briefly Explained. A Q&A with Nick Adams Q: Nick, what is the correct term to use when addressing my new friends: Black or African-American? A: Personally, I always liked Afro-American. I liked being named after a 1970's hairdo. But then I wondered why we didn't become the Jheri-curled Americans or High Top Fade Americans. Q: Nick, if black people can use the "N" word as a term of endearment, can I, a white person, do so? A: No. I don't care if you have your hair in cornrows while wearing a Phat Farm t-shirt at an R. Kelly concert. Black people don't get to be president, and white people don't get to use the word nigger. Can we just call it even now? Q: Nick, I'd like to try slang. Is that okay? A: When you guys start using our words, that's when we know it's time for us to stop using them. Every time a white, middle-aged math teacher calls a student, "dog," black people all over the country are notified via email. Believe it. Q: Nick, surely you have to agree that Eminem is a hip-hop visionary? A: Let's try this one more time: Kurtis Blow, RUN-DMC, LL Cool J, Rakim, Chuck D, KRS-One, Tupac, Notorious B.I.G., Nas, Common, Mos Def, Bitch!

30 review for Making Friends With Black People

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle at Diction Media Group

    Nick Adams is hilarious. Period. This is a wittingly poignant book that everyone should read. It might not seem as funny to someone who hasn't felt like class pet just cause you decided to rock afro puffs this morning. But for anyone who is constantly asked to speak for their entire race (whichever minority race you may be), stop answering questions about your people and culture and don't get offended by Becky, Fern, or Jim... Just leave a copy of this book next to your water cooler and watch yo Nick Adams is hilarious. Period. This is a wittingly poignant book that everyone should read. It might not seem as funny to someone who hasn't felt like class pet just cause you decided to rock afro puffs this morning. But for anyone who is constantly asked to speak for their entire race (whichever minority race you may be), stop answering questions about your people and culture and don't get offended by Becky, Fern, or Jim... Just leave a copy of this book next to your water cooler and watch your workplace change IMMEDIATELY!!! (Note: my favorite part of reading this book was cackling to myself while riding in a packed rush hour train... just PRAYING that one of them would ask what I was reading! "Please God, if you make them ask me what I'm reading, I promise the next book I'll pick up will be a bible!" He didn't answer...)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I'm not totally sure what the point of this book is. It's a bit raunchy, which I should have guessed when in the dedication the author thanked his wife for the sex. That was a bit strange... It reminded me a lot about the Why do Black People Love Fried Chicken book. It was the author's opinion with no evidence of research. I was also thrown by the comment of how black people leave the church behind as soon as they are old enough, and then reading his chapter on Christianity. I found it insensitive I'm not totally sure what the point of this book is. It's a bit raunchy, which I should have guessed when in the dedication the author thanked his wife for the sex. That was a bit strange... It reminded me a lot about the Why do Black People Love Fried Chicken book. It was the author's opinion with no evidence of research. I was also thrown by the comment of how black people leave the church behind as soon as they are old enough, and then reading his chapter on Christianity. I found it insensitive and I was dissapointed. Not that he left the church, that's his choice, but how he was disrespectful to God and other Christians. I can't imagine his mom would have been impressed, either.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Nick Adam's well-meaning and humorous look at the challenges that white people face attempting to understand us was published in 2006. It probably wasn't best to wait until 2010 to read this book. Some parts are funny. Especially when he talks about white people attempting to handle hip-hop and actually assuming they know what good hip-hop is. The part about white people dancing and being in clubs is funny too. But then, Nick just begins to sound like a know-it-all angry prick with a soft spot fo Nick Adam's well-meaning and humorous look at the challenges that white people face attempting to understand us was published in 2006. It probably wasn't best to wait until 2010 to read this book. Some parts are funny. Especially when he talks about white people attempting to handle hip-hop and actually assuming they know what good hip-hop is. The part about white people dancing and being in clubs is funny too. But then, Nick just begins to sound like a know-it-all angry prick with a soft spot for hot white women. He begins to lose his credibility and you are unable to take his book seriously. Nick says that he can't be the voice for all black people, but it sure seems like he attempts to with this book, and not even that well.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    What starts as every stand-up comedian's observations on the difference between white people and black people ("White guys do this, while black guys do THIS!") slowly turns into a thoughtful and insightful look at one guy's experience in a country where being relegated to second class citizen status still happens on an all too regular basis. There aren't many tips on actually making friends with black people other than don't be the guy who wants to use the n-word and quit saying Eminem is great, What starts as every stand-up comedian's observations on the difference between white people and black people ("White guys do this, while black guys do THIS!") slowly turns into a thoughtful and insightful look at one guy's experience in a country where being relegated to second class citizen status still happens on an all too regular basis. There aren't many tips on actually making friends with black people other than don't be the guy who wants to use the n-word and quit saying Eminem is great, but it's an eye-opening read with jokes that serve as the sugar to make the medicine go down easier.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kellee

    I wish there was a blank star for "hated it." This book sucked big-time! I will be the first to admit that there were a few times I giggled, but most of the time, I was shaking my head in disgust. I will also admit, I am a black woman and not the biggest fan of white people the majority of the time, but I found this book very racist and downright degrading to white people. His attempt at adding humor to make it sound funny just didn't work. In my opinion, he is very bitter, cocky, annoying and d I wish there was a blank star for "hated it." This book sucked big-time! I will be the first to admit that there were a few times I giggled, but most of the time, I was shaking my head in disgust. I will also admit, I am a black woman and not the biggest fan of white people the majority of the time, but I found this book very racist and downright degrading to white people. His attempt at adding humor to make it sound funny just didn't work. In my opinion, he is very bitter, cocky, annoying and disrespectful to God. I only continued to read the book because it was chosen in a book club I'm in...I also didn't see more than maybe 3 tips on "how to make friends with black people."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

    This is a great book for all of you well-meaning white folks out there. Adams illustrates to us cultural etiquette and boundaries in interacting with our black friends and colleagues. He uses clever humor to put across some pretty serious issues about racism and politics, but keeps the reader feeling comfortable. A bi-racial friend of mine found this book somewhat trite, but if you have always wondered things like "why can't white people use the "N" word?" or "Is it ok to try to use the handshake This is a great book for all of you well-meaning white folks out there. Adams illustrates to us cultural etiquette and boundaries in interacting with our black friends and colleagues. He uses clever humor to put across some pretty serious issues about racism and politics, but keeps the reader feeling comfortable. A bi-racial friend of mine found this book somewhat trite, but if you have always wondered things like "why can't white people use the "N" word?" or "Is it ok to try to use the handshake?" you need to read this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Daniel

    NOt only did this book make me laugh until I nearly peed my pants, it really gave you a lot to think about afterwords. It does need a re-write on the chapter on blacks in politics. There is a breif mention of a certain senator from Illinois, but the author pointedly says "black people don't get to be president". Not that having a black president has solved the problem of racism by a long shot, it has certainly given an entire generation at the very least hope.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ericka Fluellen

    the author discusses things you should or should not do when making friends with black people. It is not necessarily true, but it is a great discussiomn starter. This an an awesome book to introduce cultural difference for the college aged crowd. It has a humorous tone and cites differences with ease. It also has some interesting illustrations. Very fun to read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    I thought the author made some valid points but this book was more a diatribe than anything. He's definitely got some anger issues. Oh yeah, and he could have found a better copyeditor. Lots of typos.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    This book is pretty funny, but I'm not sure if it delivers on its title. I finished reading it back in January and so far, I haven't made any new friends of any kind. But, I guess that's not the point, is it?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sumayyah

    Crudely amusing and realistic (to a certain demographic of the United States of America) but makes the mistake of over-generalizing some issues and glosses over other. Still, a decent way to pass time and laugh.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shaina

    HILARIOUS! Completely tongue and cheek look at race differences and especially funny if you grew up in the 80's and 90's like the author (who's nephew actually attended the school I taught at in Norfolk :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emily Gordon

    Adams writes in a style that is half-comedic, half-satiric, and he drives home some sharp points about racial division in the United States.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I recommend this book to all my friends. I read it and still read parts of it when I want to laugh. He writes with a frank sense of humor that I found refreshing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    It sounds worse then it is. Actually very funny and smart.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Terica

    My 1st Big Lots book find. I had to buy it for Nathan, cause you know he has issues making friends with black people.

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

    A funny take on various aspects that white America is unaware of. While humorous throughout I hope most people will realize how much minorities are still treated like crap.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Hilarious while making a point, but not an in your face point. Laughed my face off while seeing another perspective.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Duus

    Very clever, funny, insightful. Is, in fact, about what the title states; i.e. social commentary. For example: a vicious broadside against Eminem.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Some really funny material and quotes, but loses steam toward the end. I'd rather see it performed live.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jenene

    VERY Funny! Hope the writer does an updated version (published in 2006).

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    some good and interesting points. glad I got it from the library and didn't buy it

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lila

    Funny as hell, but made you think! Laugh out loud bits - with plenty of soul jerking realizations about how America behaves toward minorities...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    At this point the references are pretty dated, but it was still mostly funny.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Valarie

    The book I would have written if I had the energy. I loved it so much, many of my friends got a copy the year I bought it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emily Seaman

    Pretty funny book. Had a bit of a dip in the middle of it (ranting), but then it evened back out again. I would recommend it!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nick Adams

    I love it, but i wrote it. Dedicated to some Spokane pals, Tae, Terrence, my fake pal Mike,. Super fake. yeah.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    Couldn't finish it. I thought is was somewhat outdated.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa614

    Quick and funny read. Found myself chuckling at times. I totally get the author's humor.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    horrible. so glad I'm done with it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.