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A young girl called Tozi stands at the bottom of a pyramid, waiting to be led to the top where her heart will be cut out... Pepillo, a Spanish orphan who serves a sadistic Dominican friar, is aboard the Spanish fleet as it sails towards Mexico... This is the epic story of the clash of two empires, two armies and two gods of war. Five hundred desperate adventurers are about t A young girl called Tozi stands at the bottom of a pyramid, waiting to be led to the top where her heart will be cut out... Pepillo, a Spanish orphan who serves a sadistic Dominican friar, is aboard the Spanish fleet as it sails towards Mexico... This is the epic story of the clash of two empires, two armies and two gods of war. Five hundred desperate adventurers are about to pit themselves against the most brutal armies of the ancient Americas, armies hundreds of thousands strong. This is a war of gods and men. Dark powers that work behind the scenes of history show their hand as the prophecy of the return of Quetzalcoatl is fulfilled with the arrival of Cortes. The Aztec ruler Moctezuma fights to maintain the demands of the war god Huitzilopochtli for human sacrifice. The Spanish Inquisition is planning an even greater blood-letting. Caught up in the headlong collision between two gods of war are Tozi, Pepillo and the beautiful sex slave Malinal whose hatred of Moctezuma runs so deep she will sell out her own land and people to destroy him.


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A young girl called Tozi stands at the bottom of a pyramid, waiting to be led to the top where her heart will be cut out... Pepillo, a Spanish orphan who serves a sadistic Dominican friar, is aboard the Spanish fleet as it sails towards Mexico... This is the epic story of the clash of two empires, two armies and two gods of war. Five hundred desperate adventurers are about t A young girl called Tozi stands at the bottom of a pyramid, waiting to be led to the top where her heart will be cut out... Pepillo, a Spanish orphan who serves a sadistic Dominican friar, is aboard the Spanish fleet as it sails towards Mexico... This is the epic story of the clash of two empires, two armies and two gods of war. Five hundred desperate adventurers are about to pit themselves against the most brutal armies of the ancient Americas, armies hundreds of thousands strong. This is a war of gods and men. Dark powers that work behind the scenes of history show their hand as the prophecy of the return of Quetzalcoatl is fulfilled with the arrival of Cortes. The Aztec ruler Moctezuma fights to maintain the demands of the war god Huitzilopochtli for human sacrifice. The Spanish Inquisition is planning an even greater blood-letting. Caught up in the headlong collision between two gods of war are Tozi, Pepillo and the beautiful sex slave Malinal whose hatred of Moctezuma runs so deep she will sell out her own land and people to destroy him.

30 review for War God: Nights of the Witch

  1. 5 out of 5

    Frances

    3.5 * With some historical facts included and several mystical scenes, the tale begins in the year 1519 as the Aztecs sacrifice literally thousands of people on top of their sacred pyramid. Unknown to them the gold hungry Spaniards are about to arrive on their shores and take their treasures at any cost. Graham Hancock provides a superb and powerful story while introducing several strong characters as they struggle to survive and find peace in their lives. For readers who are not faint of heart a 3.5 * With some historical facts included and several mystical scenes, the tale begins in the year 1519 as the Aztecs sacrifice literally thousands of people on top of their sacred pyramid. Unknown to them the gold hungry Spaniards are about to arrive on their shores and take their treasures at any cost. Graham Hancock provides a superb and powerful story while introducing several strong characters as they struggle to survive and find peace in their lives. For readers who are not faint of heart as it is extremely graphic with much blood and gore, along with massive battle scenes.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Description: A young girl called Tozi stands at the bottom of a pyramid, waiting to be led to the top where her heart will be cut out... Pepillo, a Spanish orphan who serves a sadistic Dominican friar, is aboard the Spanish fleet as it sails towards Mexico... This is the epic story of the clash of two empires, two armies and two gods of war. Five hundred desperate adventurers are about to pit themselves against the most brutal armies of the ancient Americas, armies hundreds of thousands strong. Thi Description: A young girl called Tozi stands at the bottom of a pyramid, waiting to be led to the top where her heart will be cut out... Pepillo, a Spanish orphan who serves a sadistic Dominican friar, is aboard the Spanish fleet as it sails towards Mexico... This is the epic story of the clash of two empires, two armies and two gods of war. Five hundred desperate adventurers are about to pit themselves against the most brutal armies of the ancient Americas, armies hundreds of thousands strong. This is a war of gods and men. Dark powers that work behind the scenes of history show their hand as the prophecy of the return of Quetzalcoatl is fulfilled with the arrival of Cortes. The Aztec ruler Moctezuma fights to maintain the demands of the war god Huitzilopochtli for human sacrifice. The Spanish Inquisition is planning an even greater blood-letting. Caught up in the headlong collision between two gods of war are Tozi, Pepillo and the beautiful sex slave Malinal whose hatred of Moctezuma runs so deep she will sell out her own land and people to destroy him. Opening: Tenochtitlan (Mexico City), Thursday 18 February 1519: Moctezuma loved eminences, for to stand on any high place was to be reminded that he was the greatest and most magnificent of men, wielding the power of life and death over all he surveyed. Yet of the countless high places in his kingdom, none offered him a deeper and more abiding sense of ownership, or clearer evidence of his own importance, than the summit platform of the colossal pyramid on which he now perched, soaring three hundred feet above his glorious capital city Tenochtitlan, which in turn stood on an island in the midst of a vast lake at the centre of an immense valley surrounded by lofty, snow-capped mountains. As expected, the beginning is a veritable gorefest of human sacrifice - those Aztecs weren't big on heart, unless you're talking about ripping it out of a live body! The book is a top to toe bloody adventure, which is in keeping with the subject, yet I am sure that the reader doesn't have to be shown so many gore scenes, we get the picture Mr. Hancock, truly we do. The different storylines are very exciting in their own right, especially when Cortes does a moonlight flit in one chapter, whilst the three are at the top of the pyramid in the next. Phewie! □ □ □ □ □ □ □ LATER: as the adventure proceeds there is increased switching between all the perspectives, a mere couple of paragraphs to a storyline then... switch switch switch For me, this heightened the excitement, yet I can see that others will get fed up, RIGHT HERE, with this approach because honestly, there is a huge cast of two dimensional characters in what can only be called teams, each with their own agenda. If you fancy a blood soaked story ending in a battle between three gods then I can recommend this □ □ □ □ □ □ □ BEST LINES: 'You know nothing, Ahuizotl! - Memories of Jon Snow - P.206 'Moctezuma felt it coming now, felt death all over him like a swarm of bees' - Memories of Eddie Izzard - P.208 Diego Velasquez de Cuellar FROM WIKI: Noting the weakness of the natives, Velázquez authorized the importation of black slaves in 1513. He authorized various expeditions to explore lands further west, including the 1517 Francisco Hernández de Córdoba expedition to Yucatán (see: Spanish Conquest of Yucatán), and Juan de Grijalva's 1518 expedition. He was made the 1st Adelantado of Cuba with jurisdiction over the former Governorship of the Indies. He initially backed Hernán Cortés's famous expedition to Mexico but pulled back his support before the expedition was scheduled to launch and then that was the end. Cortés disobeyed Velázquez's orders to disband his expeditionary force and left for Mexico anyway. Huitzilopochtli Quetzalcoatl By the way, does anyone else remember Atari's Montezuma's Revenge? This book reminds me of that game. If you would prefer a non-fiction then I heartily recommend this. It is just as crammed with gore, natch! 3* Fingerprints of the Gods: The Evidence of Earth's Lost Civilization 4* The Sign and the Seal: The Quest for the Lost Ark of the Covenant TR Supernatural: Meetings with the Ancient Teachers of Mankind 4* The Message of the Sphinx: A Quest for the Hidden Legacy of Mankind 3* Heaven's Mirror: Quest for the Lost Civilization 1* Entangled CR War God 4* Talisman: Sacred Cities, Secret Faith

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    We jump back 200 years from my last book & start C 1519 The chapters are told through different POV’s with a common timeline & introductions are swiftly made through the first 50 pages. Further characters do come into the story but they follow the storylines of the main characters. Our story starts with Moctezuma & we are introduced to the world of the Mexicas (commonly referred to as the Aztecs) through his eyes, they are a warlike people who subjugate all around them making them pay tribute els We jump back 200 years from my last book & start C 1519 The chapters are told through different POV’s with a common timeline & introductions are swiftly made through the first 50 pages. Further characters do come into the story but they follow the storylines of the main characters. Our story starts with Moctezuma & we are introduced to the world of the Mexicas (commonly referred to as the Aztecs) through his eyes, they are a warlike people who subjugate all around them making them pay tribute else they make war & take prisoners for human sacrifice (which is covered in some detail early on)...... he comes across as a tad unhinged. Within his prisoner pens where thousands are held awaiting ritual sacrifice we are introduced to a teenage girl (14 year old Tozi) who is renounced as a witch by all around..... YES Magic is involved; more like mind control / hypnosis if you will plus she can fade out of vision....... It’s a bit eye rolling at first but the chapters are short & we at least get a view from those suffering at the hands of the Aztecs. The Tlascalans who stand alone against the Aztecs are represented through the eyes of one of their war chiefs & through this POV we learn about the peoples of the time, belief systems & the alike. From the Spanish side we of course we have THE Hernan Cortes, it would be remiss without him! His trusted lieutenant also has a role to play who is a bit of a dab hand with a sword. Pepillo, another youngster comes to us early on, an orphan raised by the Dominican monks who has been seconded to the expedition, that of Cortes sailing to the new lands in the West from Cuba, to serve as a page to a certain Father Munoz...... Boo Hiss..... none other than an Inquisitor who is portrayed/typecast as a religious zealot & sadistic sodomite to boot, from the off. I found myself fully engrossed within the first 100 pages, enjoying the historical setting & the array of characters the author has created/utilised. The chapters are short & do tend to leave a cliffhanger or three at the end of every POV. I would also say some of the characters are a little overdramatic at times but I’ll admit I found it a lively opening & a really enjoyable tale set on the eve of the Spanish conquest of the Americas. However...... at jus over halfway some of the plotting is a little weak within the Mexicas camp (Moctezuma & Tozi specifically) with the “magic/god” element becoming more & more fantastical to such an extent that Tozi, now being able to “fade” for longer, certainly becomes handy, for when the plots get a tad dodge....... eye roll! Some of the characters are becoming a bit too dramatic as well whilst others are jus plain pathetic & have outlived their need...... a shame as I was quite enjoying the opening story..... That said, the last 150 pages deal mostly with the conquistadors invasion of the new lands & “contact” with the Mayans & it’s a good read depicting the warcraft of the era along with a dose of intrigue through the sub-plots...... as well as major battle scenes. The impact/differences in religion are also covered & fits well within the story. Overall.... If you want human sacrifices, tripping on shrooms, sword fights, mass battles, treachery, evil inquisitors with a fair splash of magic under the guise of historical fiction then look no further...... if you don’t, well this book might very well disappoint. I’l admit it does get silly at times what with Moctezuma conversing with his god “hummingbird” whilst on mushrooms & Cortes having a one-to-one with St Peter whilst he’s dreaming but putting that aside it’s mostly good fun, certainly it needs to be read in that context. The fantastical element (or two) does get stronger as you go deeper into the book, reminds me a bit of certain David Gemmil stories Ive read in that actuality & it’s not really a pure historical fiction novel come journey’s end. Jus don’t take it too seriously & you’ll be fine as the h/f content is still good & it’s a period not all that well covered hence my interest. As a caveat you’ll need to enjoy both h/f & fantasy, certainly not one for the purists amongst you. Me though I mostly enjoyed it, 3.75 stars rounded up to 4 for this swashbuckler! Now if they’d kept to a superstition based ingredient within the Mexicas pov’s instead of delving into fantastical magic I would have rated much much higher as that would have been more within the realm of believability!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Al

    If you've ever read historical fiction and thought, "Hey, this is great and all, but it could really use more white male perspective"--Then here's the book for you. Nothing like 500+ pages of Eurocentrism slapped over what was otherwise a beautiful and unique culture. Top that off with the last quarter of the book being a never-ending overly-drawn-out boy's fantasy of a battle? War God just ends up being tedious and frustrating to anyone who picks up a book to take a look at things from a differ If you've ever read historical fiction and thought, "Hey, this is great and all, but it could really use more white male perspective"--Then here's the book for you. Nothing like 500+ pages of Eurocentrism slapped over what was otherwise a beautiful and unique culture. Top that off with the last quarter of the book being a never-ending overly-drawn-out boy's fantasy of a battle? War God just ends up being tedious and frustrating to anyone who picks up a book to take a look at things from a different perspective (and isn't that the purpose of reading, after all?).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Milo

    http://thefoundingfields.com/2013/06/... “An epic book that details the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. Hancock’s prose is strong and the story encompasses a vast scale, but ultimately there are some elements that let the book down.” ~The Founding Fields I went into War God not really knowing what to expect. I’d heard of Graham Hancock before, but this was the first time I’d come across any of his fiction. I also went into the book expecting historical fiction, but it isn’t long before it comes cl http://thefoundingfields.com/2013/06/... “An epic book that details the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. Hancock’s prose is strong and the story encompasses a vast scale, but ultimately there are some elements that let the book down.” ~The Founding Fields I went into War God not really knowing what to expect. I’d heard of Graham Hancock before, but this was the first time I’d come across any of his fiction. I also went into the book expecting historical fiction, but it isn’t long before it comes clear that this viewpoint of the Spanish Conquest of Mexico is in fact historical fantasy, not historical fiction. The author takes you on an epic tour of events giving you perspectives from multiple viewpoints, allowing for an enthralling story that will keep you reading. But it isn’t perfect – there are some issues that I had with War God which I shall touch on later in this review. "A young girl called Tozi stands at the bottom of a pyramid, waiting to be led to the top where her heart will be cut out… Pepillo, a Spanish orphan who serves a sadistic Dominican friar, is aboard the Spanish fleet as it sails towards Mexico… This is the epic story of the clash of two empires, two armies and two gods of war. Five hundred desperate adventurers are about to pit themselves against the most brutal armies of the ancient Americas, armies hundreds of thousands strong. This is a war of gods and men. Dark powers that work behind the scenes of history show their hand as the prophecy of the return of Quetzalcoatl is fulfilled with the arrival of Cortes. The Aztec ruler Moctezuma fights to maintain the demands of the war god Huitzilopochtli for human sacrifice. The Spanish Inquisition is planning an even greater blood-letting. Caught up in the headlong collision between two gods of war are Tozi, Pepillo and the beautiful sex slave Malinal whose hatred of Moctezuma runs so deep she will sell out her own land and people to destroy him." The blurb itself is epic, and that word really nails the description of the book. It’s epic. War God certainly isn’t light reading, coming in at over six hundred pages in the hardback version that I was sent for review. The characters are varied, and the book boasts such a large amount of cast that the writer has had to include a dramatis personae at the end of the book in order to inform the reader of their roles. I’m a bit torn on the needs of dramatis personaes myself – whilst they’re helpful for checking up on characters and reminding readers what role they play – shouldn’t a good book be able to make you remember them without needing one? Sure, A Game of Thrones by George RR Martin had a massive list of characters – but the fact that they were so well crafted meant that I never had to use it for reference once. The same cannot be said with War God, for the characters, whilst are strong in certain elements, are let down in others. Tozi, Malinal, Cortes and others are all enjoyable characters, but they’re just not as memorable as I’d like them to be. I kept wondering who these people were – their voices were never really distinctive enough to stand out. It isn’t helped by the fact that the book is difficult to read in places, and the chapters themselves are quite short – normally this works in a thriller, but a thriller War God is not. It’s Historical Fantasy. Whilst there are some battle sequences and moments that are quicker paced, it only really works if the whole novel is a non-stop ride, and War God certainly isn’t that. It starts slow, and takes a while to get going. The plotlines themselves are far too predictable and as a result, Hancock is forced to move this book into an historical fantasy setting to make the book even more interesting, like the case with Conn Iggulden’s epic Rome series, of which I’ve read the first two volumes of. Only the difference is that whilst Iggulden didn’t need to change history to make it more unpredictable, it was indeed needed here. The time period itself however is what makes this book compelling, allowing for an interesting scenario. As I’ve never read a book about the Aztec Conquest of Mexico before this book was engrossing and when Hancock does stick to the facts, it’s clear that he knows his history, having written numerous books in the past. The action sequences delivered here are well written, bloody and no-holds barred. I’ve mentioned Game of Thrones earlier in this review and I’m going to bring it up again, this book has a similar level of gore and violence, allowing for a dark outlook that just shows how grim this period of history was. He’s shed a light onto a period of history that not many people will know much about and it’s refreshing to read a tale that does not focus on characters from either a British or American perspective. It’s not a bad book despite the negatives that I’ve had to say – and I’m pretty sure that you’ll find something to enjoy here if you’re a fan of either historical fiction or historical fantasy – or both, so this’ll be one that you shouldn’t pass up. VERDICT: 3/5

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ard

    Very exciting story about the Spanish conquest of the new world, although this book is only part one of a series. I liked most of Hancock's non-fiction and was pleasantly surprised by Entangled, his first work of fiction. In War God he shows himself a skillful writer of exciting historical fiction, spinning a fascinating tale full of adventure, violence, drama and more than a whiff of the supernatural. I can't wait for the sequel. Very exciting story about the Spanish conquest of the new world, although this book is only part one of a series. I liked most of Hancock's non-fiction and was pleasantly surprised by Entangled, his first work of fiction. In War God he shows himself a skillful writer of exciting historical fiction, spinning a fascinating tale full of adventure, violence, drama and more than a whiff of the supernatural. I can't wait for the sequel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Murray

    Graham Hancock has ventured into novel writing to great effect. Known for his excellent investigative pieces in alternative viewpoints on history and archeology, his writing might have been too didactic to be entertaining. In fact, the reverse is true. His empathy for the history of the 16th Century and its excesses of zealotry, underpin an excellent evocation of an era. To call this book a fantasy is a misnomer. Some fantastical things happen, but they are within the belief systems of the chara Graham Hancock has ventured into novel writing to great effect. Known for his excellent investigative pieces in alternative viewpoints on history and archeology, his writing might have been too didactic to be entertaining. In fact, the reverse is true. His empathy for the history of the 16th Century and its excesses of zealotry, underpin an excellent evocation of an era. To call this book a fantasy is a misnomer. Some fantastical things happen, but they are within the belief systems of the characters and so work rather well. Here is my full Amazon review (there are no spoilers) Clash of the War Gods Fasten your seat-belts for a roller-coaster ride when you embark on War God. You meet, in short order, young Pepillo by Santiago harbour, carrying the unspeakable belongings of his master, the dark hearted inquisitor. At the same time, a few hundred miles away from Cuba, the orphaned witch Tozi is struggling to stay alive in the fattening pens, in sight of the blood soaked pyramids of the Aztecs. Dominating a pyramid is the Aztec king Moctezuma, on a huge killing spree, while his armies gather to attack neighbouring tribes to capture more victims for slaughter. Spying from a hillside above one of these armies, the courageous warrior Shikotenka, has a desperate stratagem to save his people from the altars of blood. Graham Hancock’s first novel, charting the clash of two warrior empires, is both gripping and convincing. War God is described as historical within the fantasy genre. Hancock uses forays into the paranormal to powerful effect and in a way that is entirely believable. The Spaniards, with their absolute certainty of their moral right, live in a world where saints can, and do, intervene in human affairs. Moctezuma, uses hallucinogens and the psychic power of mass slaughter, to alter his consciousness to commune with the fickle god, Hummingbird. He knows he lives in a year when the fates decree his empire is at risk and he is determined to prevent this. Young Tozi can, at great physical cost to herself, become briefly invisible to others not skilled in her magic. This is how she has, so far at least, avoided losing her heart to a slash of an obsidian knife. Both militant Christianity and the barbarous rites of the Mexica people, involved mass slaughter of innocents. Yet within each of these traditions were individuals of true nobility who influenced the course of history. Hancock provides an attractive portrayal of the wily and courageous Cortes. The war exploits of Shikotenka presents some of the finest action writing since O’Brian’s Aubrey and Maturin series. We must hope this novel is the first of a his own series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Callum

    You won't believe this story, but I swear on all I hold dear, it's true. I was minding my own business, enjoying this book, making it all the way through to its final chapter. One day, on a very dark day, I found myself helping out some family friends at the local church - of which I'm not a part of - and I brought my little signed copy of NIGHTS OF THE WITCH book along with me to finish. I'm in the background, reading up to the final chapter whilst the church is doing its thing, and afterwards I You won't believe this story, but I swear on all I hold dear, it's true. I was minding my own business, enjoying this book, making it all the way through to its final chapter. One day, on a very dark day, I found myself helping out some family friends at the local church - of which I'm not a part of - and I brought my little signed copy of NIGHTS OF THE WITCH book along with me to finish. I'm in the background, reading up to the final chapter whilst the church is doing its thing, and afterwards I help pack their stuff away. I do not recall if I placed the book back in my bag or left it on the bench, but what I do know is that after helping out and bring my bag with me outside, lo and behold my book has vanished. I know it was there. I know what happened. But I will never be able to prove that my dear, heathen-looking copy of the NIGHTS OF THE WITCH was picked up by some petrified, god-fearing old lady, brought home in a plastic bag whilst chanting the name of Jesus over it, drowned in holy water, and thrown into the fires of hell. I searched and searched. I got the caretaker to search. I got the bloody pastor to search. Nada. I asked the whole flaming congregation over the weeks to come. No one came forward. But I know. I know. To this day I have not read that final chapter. FIVE. YEARS. I am too heart-broken to buy another copy. I even have a signed book of the sequel.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Frane

    I had never heard of Graham Hancock prior to picking this book up, but it's apparent that he's had a long and successful career writing nonfiction. It's also apparent that he is less adept at fiction and could really use a good editor. The novel isn't so much an historical account but a fantasy built largely on historical accuracy. Hancock has a tin ear for dialog and scatters anachronisms and colloquialisms throughout (get an editor!). The dialog is particularly grating when his characters commu I had never heard of Graham Hancock prior to picking this book up, but it's apparent that he's had a long and successful career writing nonfiction. It's also apparent that he is less adept at fiction and could really use a good editor. The novel isn't so much an historical account but a fantasy built largely on historical accuracy. Hancock has a tin ear for dialog and scatters anachronisms and colloquialisms throughout (get an editor!). The dialog is particularly grating when his characters commune with their various spiritual guides and gods. He also clutters the book up with details and explanations that do nothing to advance the story. Seriously, if I want to know the names of every piece of horse armor I'll look it up; I don't need it in the midst of a piece of fiction. Still, Hancock did manage to hold my interest for 500 pages, perhaps simply because the setting is so exotic and rich. A good editor, even a good copy editor would go a long way toward an actual novel. If I had an inkling this had happened (less and less likely these days with a successful author) I'd consider reading the next volume. Otherwise, I'll keep working on my To Be Read piles focusing on real fiction.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Kurtz

    Fantastic! I couldn't put it down! If you are interested in history and how the Spanish managed to conquer so many native people in North America, then this book is for you. I could visualize being in the places described in the book and I could almost smell the fear of the people or the sweat on the horses. Now I have a great understanding of how the people of Mexico lived and fought before Cortez arrived and how the Spanish were organized to take on such huge armies. I can't wait for the next boo Fantastic! I couldn't put it down! If you are interested in history and how the Spanish managed to conquer so many native people in North America, then this book is for you. I could visualize being in the places described in the book and I could almost smell the fear of the people or the sweat on the horses. Now I have a great understanding of how the people of Mexico lived and fought before Cortez arrived and how the Spanish were organized to take on such huge armies. I can't wait for the next book in this obvious series!!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Pearson

    I want to start this review by saying that I am a fan of Hancock. I really enjoyed his finger prints of the gods and although some of his other non fiction is a little on the "evidence please" side, I still didn't mind them for the narrative. This is his first adventure into fiction and I must say I found it a little bloated (according to Hancocks notes at the end, this is the streamlined version...). The main characters where interesting, but the auxiliaries largely forgettable and I suspect th I want to start this review by saying that I am a fan of Hancock. I really enjoyed his finger prints of the gods and although some of his other non fiction is a little on the "evidence please" side, I still didn't mind them for the narrative. This is his first adventure into fiction and I must say I found it a little bloated (according to Hancocks notes at the end, this is the streamlined version...). The main characters where interesting, but the auxiliaries largely forgettable and I suspect that is why he included an index at the end for them. The book started slow and I actually found myself in a few sections, kind of engaging endurance reading mode. However I don't think it was for want of poor narrative, rather excessive details that the sections felt slow. That being said there are some really intriguing parts that compensate measurably for this. I also found part two to be a little tortue pornish. There seemed to be some South American (or South Americans) being murdered horribly on each page (really not joking, every bloody page!). An argument could be made that this reflects the reality of the situation and I completely understand, though I'd argue the frequency bloats the book for little gain and could of been expressed more intelligently via a few examples, instead of this desensitizing approach (again details!). Finally I want to comment on the language used. It's clear this book was written by a English man in their sixties, when such phrases as "toss pot", "girly man", "wanker", "let's go chaps" and finally when Cortess exclaims "Tally - ho! Let's withdraw our cricket bats and give these fellows a mighty fine spanking" (fine... made that last one up!) are used. to conclude, when you pick up a book titled "war god" you kind of know what to expect. Your going to sprout a few mustache hairs, such is the manliness within these pages and it's not for the faint hearted *closes book in a manly way and uses it for bicep curls*. Overall it contained some good bits (read the above fan reviews for them). but was a bit too bloated and lacking in subtleties for my tastes.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Guntario

    I would really like to rate this a 3.5, but I can't. The story is really good, and I love that I get to learn a bit about history while reading. However, it's seriously drawn out. As long as this book is, I should have been able to learn about not only Corez's initial conquest, but also the entire conquest. Hancock just went too much into detail on stuff that had absolutely no bearing on the story at all. There was probably 20% of the book devoted to two characters that had absolutely nothing to I would really like to rate this a 3.5, but I can't. The story is really good, and I love that I get to learn a bit about history while reading. However, it's seriously drawn out. As long as this book is, I should have been able to learn about not only Corez's initial conquest, but also the entire conquest. Hancock just went too much into detail on stuff that had absolutely no bearing on the story at all. There was probably 20% of the book devoted to two characters that had absolutely nothing to do with the story whatsoever, and I'm honestly racking my brain as to why he included these two ladies at all. Not only did he include these two ladies, but he made them out to be some kind of mystical beings that colluded with the gods of their people. Then, he also discussed other tribes that were fighting which didn't have anything to do with the story. After all of this, when it got to about 95% of the way through the book, I was completely confused as to where he was going and how he could possibly end the book. Well, it ended abruptly thereafter and was simply a description like you'd read in a history book in college. Strange.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Neo Primatem

    I first downloaded the sample from amazon, which included the first few chapters. I don't know why but I found the first chapter overly descriptive and a bit boring, so I left it for quite a while. Then after reading his other novel, Entangled, I decided to finish War God, and it was one of the best books I've ever read. My favorite characters are probably Tozi and Pepillo because they only have good intentions, while the morality of a lot of other characters can be ambiguous at times. The Spani I first downloaded the sample from amazon, which included the first few chapters. I don't know why but I found the first chapter overly descriptive and a bit boring, so I left it for quite a while. Then after reading his other novel, Entangled, I decided to finish War God, and it was one of the best books I've ever read. My favorite characters are probably Tozi and Pepillo because they only have good intentions, while the morality of a lot of other characters can be ambiguous at times. The Spaniards in particular. It's true that many of the Spaniards during the inquisition were religious and committed a lot of atrocities in the name of the Christian god. It's also true that some of them just wanted to plunder a new land to become rich. I love how this book is historically accurate (mostly) yet it also draws on other less tangible things and takes the beliefs held by both the European and South American cultures and creates a backstory of this manipulative war god that seeks only destruction and death and tricks both sides into doing so. Definitely worth a read if you haven't already

  14. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    I really enjoyed this book from a historical perspective. It is extremely well researched and, as far as I can tell, fairly historically accurate, and I certainly learned a lot about a period of history that I did not know a lot about. Additionally, it was just a good read. It was exciting and very compelling to read. However, I found the characters to be rather underdeveloped. (This might be because there are simply too many of them that it would be impossible to delve too deep.) They were all f I really enjoyed this book from a historical perspective. It is extremely well researched and, as far as I can tell, fairly historically accurate, and I certainly learned a lot about a period of history that I did not know a lot about. Additionally, it was just a good read. It was exciting and very compelling to read. However, I found the characters to be rather underdeveloped. (This might be because there are simply too many of them that it would be impossible to delve too deep.) They were all fairly one dimensional and, as a result, a lot of them came off looking rather ridiculous (ie Alvarado, Moctezuma). I imagine there was a lot more going on with these characters than what came across in the novel, and I think it would have been interesting to explore that. Finally, I found a lot of the gore and violence fairly gratuitous. By the end, I found myself so desensitized by it that I was skipping over while passages describing the Mayans mangled bodies and other such things. Still, it was a highly readable book and I look forward to continuing on with the trilogy.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ruggero

    I have to say that I was expecting a greater read. I loved GH's first novel "Entangled" in fact I rate it as one of the best novel I have ever read! So I had very high expectations (which by the way is my problem). War God is a very good book, but for me, it didn't captivate me as much as I thought it would have. The book, of course flows really well therefore you can't put it down. The characters are fantastic, although the dialogs are too modern. I do look forward to the sequel which will be o I have to say that I was expecting a greater read. I loved GH's first novel "Entangled" in fact I rate it as one of the best novel I have ever read! So I had very high expectations (which by the way is my problem). War God is a very good book, but for me, it didn't captivate me as much as I thought it would have. The book, of course flows really well therefore you can't put it down. The characters are fantastic, although the dialogs are too modern. I do look forward to the sequel which will be out in October 2014 and I'm sure that the 2 books together will deliver a 5 star ratings. Right now GH is my favorite fiction novel writer.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeroen De

    I liked the genre, the fantasy like historical world that is created, however for me the story in the book is not complicated enough and progresses too slow. Stopped reading after 50%, so the third star is in case the second half of the book is better than the first half. :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Drury

    Slow to gain my interest, but once it did it had me glued and unable to put it down. Absolutely amazing...I sincerely hope the series is continued and not shelved by the publisher.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book is epic! It is well worth the price to enter the past and get to know the places, people and things that happened in this particular and peculiar part of history!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    DNF at 100 pages, because the writing style was just not for me. It's more a historical fantasy than historical fiction, with certain characters performing invisibility-magic or communing with gods and spirits, but that's not what put me off--I do enjoy a well-crafted fantasy. What threw me was, in the author's desire to keep chapters short and compelling, almost every damn chapter was a cliffhanger, to the point that it felt like every scene was getting abruptly cut off and you didn't get to see DNF at 100 pages, because the writing style was just not for me. It's more a historical fantasy than historical fiction, with certain characters performing invisibility-magic or communing with gods and spirits, but that's not what put me off--I do enjoy a well-crafted fantasy. What threw me was, in the author's desire to keep chapters short and compelling, almost every damn chapter was a cliffhanger, to the point that it felt like every scene was getting abruptly cut off and you didn't get to see almost anything get done before jumping into the next chapter in another location in someone else's point of view doing something not directly related. Sometimes a single brief sword fight would get split into 2-3 chapters, each separated from each other by 2-3 other chapters. In jumping around so much, it feels like no progress is made--like those days when you're trying to do one thing but every 2 minutes someone interrupts you with another side-quest, which gets interrupted by another and another, and by the end of the day NOTHING gets done. There are several characters to keep track of, and it seems the author's point was that everybody at the time was awful, not a lot of grey to their personalities: Moctezuma is a snooty creep with a violence-fetish, likewise his head priest and his cronies (they never look at anyone, they almost always 'leer'); Cortes, Velazquez, and other high-ranking Spanish characters are all either nasty self-interested thugs out for blood or straight-up sadists. Nobody comes out of this looking flattering, which would be okay except nobody comes out of this looking like a three-dimensional person, either. Now, I've read a lot of books about some very violent time periods, so it's not that I'm squeamish or didn't know what to expect from this era. I've read some unpleasant and violent characters, even complete psychos, who have enough facets to their personalities that you can hate/fear them and yet understand where they're coming from or see what they're getting at, even if you abhor their deeds, but so far these guys are all just "Yup...he's a jerk. If not downright evil." That makes me not want to watch their progress through more miserable actions (Oh look, he eviscerated another dude--how delightful and entirely unexpected -_- ). A few of the lower-ranking characters, like the captive in the sacrifice-fattening pen and the naive boy assigned to serve the Inquisitor, seemed fairly sympathetic to start with, but that abrupt writing style means I'm not sticking around to watch them either develop unpleasant characteristics or get murdered by one of the others. I hear the second half gets bogged down in unnecessarily detailed torture-porn, which does not encourage me to continue. Not my cup of tea, which is a shame, because it is an interesting time period I'd like to read about!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    This was nice fiction(more on this later), albeit slow to get into. Initially the dialogue felt clumsy and drawn out, but became more natural in the latter half of the book. The pace of the action also picked up in the second half of the book. After the halfway mark the read became a bit of a page turner. The setting is the conquest of Central America(initially and subsequently to the Caribbean isles) by Spanish invaders in the early 16th century. It follows the fascinating contact and soon to be This was nice fiction(more on this later), albeit slow to get into. Initially the dialogue felt clumsy and drawn out, but became more natural in the latter half of the book. The pace of the action also picked up in the second half of the book. After the halfway mark the read became a bit of a page turner. The setting is the conquest of Central America(initially and subsequently to the Caribbean isles) by Spanish invaders in the early 16th century. It follows the fascinating contact and soon to be war between representatives of the Spanish Crown and the peoples of the newly discovered(from the invaders' perspective) Americas. The exploits of conquistador Hernan Cortes and Emperor Moctezuma of the Mexica takes central stage as well as several people and nation in their surrounds. Several POV characters are effectively used to indicate the thoughts of the involved parties and their motivation. Characters come from all social classes and functions as well as the realms of the Gods. "Good" and bad character's Points Of View are represented. The depiction of war is vivid and leave nothing to the imagination. It is blood and guts, made real by the fact that these historic battles really happened. This brings me to what I personally gained from the novel. I know the Author would have done his research well (Check his track record on his non-fictional works) and therefore I ended up reading this book as non-fiction. If you end up reading fiction as non-fiction, the fiction is particularly good. In this case, however, it is closer to fact than not. All this left me with the realization(again, and for the n-th time in my life) that humans are a brutal race, capable of building great things and then destroying them spectacularly due to a difference of opinion. One might point out that the religious parts of the novel constitute the fantasy part. But for religious and god fearing people those elements would not be fantastical at all. For people not in tune with our spiritual realm, i guess, it would feel familiar, even real. I would give this book 70%, rounded up to 4 stars and it was well worth the read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarasvati

    Malinche in Mexican Spanish is a synonym of "traitor." Malinchista means "he/she (Mexican national) who favors white people & dislikes brown people." There's a TV channel in Mexico that, for decades, hired "white Hispanics", descendants of Europeans, as their main actors/actresses for their telenovelas, giving the roles of maids & servants to morenos or brown-skinned people. To this day, people who have a darker skin tone are discriminated against & people who are light skinned claim their Spa Malinche in Mexican Spanish is a synonym of "traitor." Malinchista means "he/she (Mexican national) who favors white people & dislikes brown people." There's a TV channel in Mexico that, for decades, hired "white Hispanics", descendants of Europeans, as their main actors/actresses for their telenovelas, giving the roles of maids & servants to morenos or brown-skinned people. To this day, people who have a darker skin tone are discriminated against & people who are light skinned claim their Spanish heritage as if it were sacrosanct. Nahuatl is not spoken by middle-class or wealthy Mexicans. In this context it is worthwhile mentioning that, since the Spanish Conquest, Malinche (Malinal in the novel) has been the national symbol of treason for siding with the Spaniards and not with the Mexica... This was also my particular standpoint. Until I read her biography some years ago. Unfortunately in Mexico, whatever sexual encounter happens to a girl, even forceful ones, are her fault. She caused it somehow. She wore something she shouldn't have. She did something she shouldn't have. She attracted attention in a way she shouldn't have. Men are, therefore, never to blame. It is never his intention but rather her disposition what society will eventually punish. Another peculiarity in Mexican society is the preference of sons over daughters. This component makes a huge impact in society and how it works: The mother of a son will idolize him. No matter what he does. She will not doubt him. She will never blame him. She'll always protect him... The daughter... Not so much. The third aspect that complicates matters is the sacred pedestal on which Mexican society places mothers: Mothers are perfect. Unblemished. Like the Virgin Mary. So, when a mother decides to cast her daughter, or when there's evidence of child abuse, or when the mother offers her daughter to a man, the sad truth is that she will never be held accountable: She most certainly didn't know. It was not her fault nor her responsibility... But the daughter... This is Malintzin's (Malinal's) background. An abused child who was sold into slavery & prostitution by her mother in order to protect her newborn son. And I would like to thank Graham Hancock for redeeming her.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amarjeet Singh

    As a self-proclaimed connoisseur of Mesoamerican fiction, I confess that every year I devour book after book charting the rise and fall of Mesoamerican empires albeit via fiction. How long have I been doing so? For a good one decade. Hancock's is the first narrative which left a lasting impression on me owing to its viscerality and vivid imagery. To achieve all this (and no I am not claiming to be fussy) through the medium of words alone is a significant achievement. And what makes it all the mo As a self-proclaimed connoisseur of Mesoamerican fiction, I confess that every year I devour book after book charting the rise and fall of Mesoamerican empires albeit via fiction. How long have I been doing so? For a good one decade. Hancock's is the first narrative which left a lasting impression on me owing to its viscerality and vivid imagery. To achieve all this (and no I am not claiming to be fussy) through the medium of words alone is a significant achievement. And what makes it all the more effective? The fact that Hancock has no 'slacking off' or 'cooling down' parts in his book where his story becomes monotonous. Rather, its an ascending crescendo of literary orgy set against the backdrop of the New World vs. The Old. The slight issue I had with 'Nights Of The Witch' was that its richness in antagonists and protagonists is offset by the limited time they have in the narrative. I was literally left clawing for more consistency in the narrative. Events switch from Pepillo to Tozi to Moctezuma to Cortez to Hummingbird and even Saint Peter is thrown into the mix. At times this achieves a cliffhanger passion, at others it doesn't. Overall verdict? Its going to be a long time before Hancock will be beaten at his own game.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Noah Ziegler

    There are females reviewing this work of historically based fiction, one star because of child rape and murder. The Aztecs sacrificed 80,000 people, some willing to the war god in 4 days. That's 13 people a min that we're laid out, had their hearts cut out of their chest and fed to the war god. So to say that it was a beautiful culture is funny to me? This is historically accurate to not included rape and pillaging would paint the picture wrong. Another lady said this is eurocentric garbage, well There are females reviewing this work of historically based fiction, one star because of child rape and murder. The Aztecs sacrificed 80,000 people, some willing to the war god in 4 days. That's 13 people a min that we're laid out, had their hearts cut out of their chest and fed to the war god. So to say that it was a beautiful culture is funny to me? This is historically accurate to not included rape and pillaging would paint the picture wrong. Another lady said this is eurocentric garbage, well the Aztecs didn't have a written language perse and the book is written by a white European so it's impossible to deny the claim she made 100% outright. However, if anyone understands this conundrum it's Grahm Handcock. He's brought it up countless times in his lectures how it's seemingly avoidable. He does not paint the Spaniards in a pretty light so I understand her beef but it's over-exaggerate and she's misread it misundersood his "view". Great read from a even greater mind!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence Carrington

    I really enjoyed, this historical novel with a dash of fantasy. However, I was mildly annoyed at the spelling liberties the author takes with some of the historical character's names -I get why he does it: Xicoténcatl (traditional spelling of this name) doesn't roll of the tongue like Shikotenka, and it is a fair approximation to how it's pronounced nowadays (the X in Spanish is one of the few letters that have several sounds: s, sh, h, cs), and you want your English speaking readers to "pronounc I really enjoyed, this historical novel with a dash of fantasy. However, I was mildly annoyed at the spelling liberties the author takes with some of the historical character's names -I get why he does it: Xicoténcatl (traditional spelling of this name) doesn't roll of the tongue like Shikotenka, and it is a fair approximation to how it's pronounced nowadays (the X in Spanish is one of the few letters that have several sounds: s, sh, h, cs), and you want your English speaking readers to "pronounce" correctly. Another annoyance was the use of "OK" in conversation by both Aztec and Spanish characters, which pulled me out of the narration. I'm sure there was some equivalent slang in ancient Nahuatl and Castilian, but this "modern" word is like seeing a Mayan soldier wearing a wristwatch in the middle of a battle in the sixteenth century.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jim Morris

    When an author you respect as much as I do Graham Hancock writes a novel about a period of history in which you have a great interest you read it, trusting that it will be good. It is. It's about a fascinating period of history that is poorly known in the United States, Cortes' conquest of Mexico. In recent years it's become fashionable to dump on the Spaniards, which is fine, but if you're looking for the good guys you will find them scattered in pretty much equal measure on all sides. If you'r When an author you respect as much as I do Graham Hancock writes a novel about a period of history in which you have a great interest you read it, trusting that it will be good. It is. It's about a fascinating period of history that is poorly known in the United States, Cortes' conquest of Mexico. In recent years it's become fashionable to dump on the Spaniards, which is fine, but if you're looking for the good guys you will find them scattered in pretty much equal measure on all sides. If you're looking for the good side, sorry. Human sacrifice is not a positive character trait. In any rate I do not believe you will find a better adventure novel anywhere. Well, half a very long adventure novel. There is a sequel which is the last half of the story. I am reading it now and it is just as engrossing. History absorbed not only painlessly, but happily.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris Brown

    Graham Hancock's War God Trilogy are all badly written, simplistic, needlessly gory and yet I finished all three because the story of the Spanish 'conquest' and colonization of Mexico is so fascinating. Hancock in notes at the end of the book describes other historians of this period as 'politically correct' so no surprise he loves to cover the gore and horror of human sacrifice with glee, presumably to show that yes, the Spaniards were brutal, greedy colonizers but look at how horrible the Mexi Graham Hancock's War God Trilogy are all badly written, simplistic, needlessly gory and yet I finished all three because the story of the Spanish 'conquest' and colonization of Mexico is so fascinating. Hancock in notes at the end of the book describes other historians of this period as 'politically correct' so no surprise he loves to cover the gore and horror of human sacrifice with glee, presumably to show that yes, the Spaniards were brutal, greedy colonizers but look at how horrible the Mexica were for carving out hearts of innocent victims for their Hummingbird to the Left of the Sun god. Almost stopped several times but it is such a compelling, mind-boggling story of the first interaction between Europeans and North American indigenous people.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Arseni Kritchever

    War God is a mostly historically accurate account of Hernan Cortez's expedition to Mexico and surrounding areas. It has gruesome scenes of human sacrifice and torture, thrilling duels (that actually reference real fencing masters from history! Great HEMA shootout!), and massive battles - all of which are well written. I personally could've done with less supernatural elements such as witchcraft, gods and demons but it ultimately wasn't that distracting. I enjoyed how how conflicting Cortez appea War God is a mostly historically accurate account of Hernan Cortez's expedition to Mexico and surrounding areas. It has gruesome scenes of human sacrifice and torture, thrilling duels (that actually reference real fencing masters from history! Great HEMA shootout!), and massive battles - all of which are well written. I personally could've done with less supernatural elements such as witchcraft, gods and demons but it ultimately wasn't that distracting. I enjoyed how how conflicting Cortez appears, both consumed by his lust for gold and glory but also struggling to do the right thing, and the two native female characters were well written and fun as well.

  28. 5 out of 5

    geoff western

    The time of the gods I have read 2 off the books in this trilogy and have found then to be great stories,but all so great history books,Mr Hancock has brought to life the Aztec story,his facts are correct and he has combined fact and fiction,together superbly,l wouldn't normal review a set of books before reading them all but in this case I will make an exception as the first two were so good that I don't think the third book will be indifferent if you like history books l would recommend this se The time of the gods I have read 2 off the books in this trilogy and have found then to be great stories,but all so great history books,Mr Hancock has brought to life the Aztec story,his facts are correct and he has combined fact and fiction,together superbly,l wouldn't normal review a set of books before reading them all but in this case I will make an exception as the first two were so good that I don't think the third book will be indifferent if you like history books l would recommend this set,Sherlock

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susana Lopez

    War God Interesting War Book. I was intrigued with the way the author described different characters along the story. It was not just a one sided view. I recommend this book to all who like reading about history, especially those who want to know about their Mexican and Spanish heritage.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sammy

    Not bad, but not great either. I'm not in any hurry to grab the next one, even though it ended rather abruptly. I like the Aztec setting, and it's certainly painted vividly enough (this book really isn't for the squeamish... Blood, guts, sacrifices and cannibalism galore, and described in plenty of detail!), and the story is about what you'd expect. Not bad, but not great either. I'm not in any hurry to grab the next one, even though it ended rather abruptly. I like the Aztec setting, and it's certainly painted vividly enough (this book really isn't for the squeamish... Blood, guts, sacrifices and cannibalism galore, and described in plenty of detail!), and the story is about what you'd expect.

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