counter create hit The Method of Freedom: An Errico Malatesta Reader - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Method of Freedom: An Errico Malatesta Reader

Availability: Ready to download

For sixty years, Errico Malatesta's involvement with international anarchism helped fuel the movement's radical approach to class and labor, and directly impacted the workers' movement in Italy. A talented newspaper journalist, Malatesta's biting critiques were frequently short and to the point—and written directly to and for the workers. Though his few long-form essays, i For sixty years, Errico Malatesta's involvement with international anarchism helped fuel the movement's radical approach to class and labor, and directly impacted the workers' movement in Italy. A talented newspaper journalist, Malatesta's biting critiques were frequently short and to the point—and written directly to and for the workers. Though his few long-form essays, including "Anarchy" and "Our Program," have been widely available in English translation since the 1950s, the bulk of Malatesta's most revolutionary writing remains unknown to English-speaking audiences. In The Method of Freedom, editor Davide Turcato presents an expansive collection of Malatesta's work, including new translations of existing works and a wealth of shorter essays translated here for the first time. Offering readers a thorough overview of the evolution of Malatesta's revolutionary thought during his half a century as an anarchist propagandist, The Method of Freedom explores revolutionary violence and workplace democracy, the general strike and the limitations of trade unionism, propaganda by the deed, and the revolution in practice. Errico Malatesta Errico Malatesta (1853–1932) was an enormously influential Italian anarchist, comrade of Michael Bakunin in the First International, editor of eight newspapers, and author of numerous articles and short works. Davide Turcato is a computational linguist and an independent historian. He is the author of Making Sense of Anarchism and the editor of Malatesta's collected works, a ten-volume project currently underway in Italy, to be released in English by AK Press.


Compare

For sixty years, Errico Malatesta's involvement with international anarchism helped fuel the movement's radical approach to class and labor, and directly impacted the workers' movement in Italy. A talented newspaper journalist, Malatesta's biting critiques were frequently short and to the point—and written directly to and for the workers. Though his few long-form essays, i For sixty years, Errico Malatesta's involvement with international anarchism helped fuel the movement's radical approach to class and labor, and directly impacted the workers' movement in Italy. A talented newspaper journalist, Malatesta's biting critiques were frequently short and to the point—and written directly to and for the workers. Though his few long-form essays, including "Anarchy" and "Our Program," have been widely available in English translation since the 1950s, the bulk of Malatesta's most revolutionary writing remains unknown to English-speaking audiences. In The Method of Freedom, editor Davide Turcato presents an expansive collection of Malatesta's work, including new translations of existing works and a wealth of shorter essays translated here for the first time. Offering readers a thorough overview of the evolution of Malatesta's revolutionary thought during his half a century as an anarchist propagandist, The Method of Freedom explores revolutionary violence and workplace democracy, the general strike and the limitations of trade unionism, propaganda by the deed, and the revolution in practice. Errico Malatesta Errico Malatesta (1853–1932) was an enormously influential Italian anarchist, comrade of Michael Bakunin in the First International, editor of eight newspapers, and author of numerous articles and short works. Davide Turcato is a computational linguist and an independent historian. He is the author of Making Sense of Anarchism and the editor of Malatesta's collected works, a ten-volume project currently underway in Italy, to be released in English by AK Press.

30 review for The Method of Freedom: An Errico Malatesta Reader

  1. 5 out of 5

    Javier

    Lovely text full of 78 pieces written by Malatesta over the course of his life. Very relevant and thoughtful analysis, both theoretically and practically! A pleasure to encounter such a loving, deep mind.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Micah

    "We have nothing new to say." So begins Malatesta's "Anarchist Programme" of 1899. Although ideas, and especially tactics, are in Malatesta's hands fluid and mobile, adapting to events, the underlying sentiment - of love, solidarity, and voluntary agreement - is a foundation of steel. Hatred, ressentiment, the illusion of absolute truth, intellectual systems, science-worship, determinism and the denial of passion and will: these lead down authoritarian paths. It's fantastic to have this collectio "We have nothing new to say." So begins Malatesta's "Anarchist Programme" of 1899. Although ideas, and especially tactics, are in Malatesta's hands fluid and mobile, adapting to events, the underlying sentiment - of love, solidarity, and voluntary agreement - is a foundation of steel. Hatred, ressentiment, the illusion of absolute truth, intellectual systems, science-worship, determinism and the denial of passion and will: these lead down authoritarian paths. It's fantastic to have this collection of complete articles, although I wonder if the selection doesn't give a particular picture? The editor even insists on calling Malatesta a "pragmatist" and "gradualist" - which he may have been in relation to the extremists of his day, but today these terms are misleading. Malatesta didn't think we should immediately stockpile guns always and everywhere, but he did think we should do it as soon as possible. Anarchists will operate as a minority in a revolution that may be anarchistic at best, and their mission is to drive it as far as possible, changing conditions so that "the masses" may eventually become anarchist, and trying to sap the strength of any new government. At the center is collective expropriation of the "means of life and freedom" (not just "production"), and their placement at the disposal of all. It is what we must do now, not an empty phrase or far-off daydream - to act like an anarchist is to fight for expropriation. "Of course," anarchists today say - but do they really mean it? In the last popular North American movement with anti-systemic potential - Occupy - virtually no one spoke in these terms, despite the small leap from occupation to expropriation. Much more time was spent discussing whether "occupy" was an offensive word to Palestinians or indigenous peoples, or adding it as a tag to anything and everything - "occupy money," "occupy Sandy," "occupy art," etc. These articles - maybe especially the ones written under fascism - speak to us today, as anarchists in a tiny minority, with few weapons, in a situation where insurrections are sure to break out, at least outside the overdeveloped world, but ones not necessarily leading in a liberatory direction. If one chooses to speak and act as an anarchist, Malatesta's analysis and sense of judgement are a valuable guide.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ollie

    AK Press has been doing scholars a service these past few years by putting out some pretty stellar anthologies of some of anarchism's greatest writers. First it was Proudhon and the Property is Theft! anthology. Then, there was Kropotkin's Direct Struggle Against Capital. Both edited by Iain McKaye and both informative and thorough. But this anthology on Errico Malatesta takes the cake. I don't know if it's my experience reading about anarchism, its ideas and history (notice I'm not saying "unde AK Press has been doing scholars a service these past few years by putting out some pretty stellar anthologies of some of anarchism's greatest writers. First it was Proudhon and the Property is Theft! anthology. Then, there was Kropotkin's Direct Struggle Against Capital. Both edited by Iain McKaye and both informative and thorough. But this anthology on Errico Malatesta takes the cake. I don't know if it's my experience reading about anarchism, its ideas and history (notice I'm not saying "understanding"), but the writings in The Method of Freedom are consistent, easy to understand, and for a 530 page book, this is a pretty easy read. There are many themes and ideas that Malatesta explores in these writings which range from how to organize (and who to organize with) to what anarchist values should be, to what positions the anarchist have had throughout the years. All are explained very plainly and effectively and very consistently might I add (is this due to the editor picking and choosing, I wonder?). It's also clear that Malatesta was a pretty witty man and it shows in these writings. I don't mind that one bit either. What I love most about this book is how Malatesta doesn't shy away from putting anarchists (and himself) to task for coming short in their actions and theories, like failing to support strikes, attempting to join governments, and undermining how important it is to teach the multitudes so as to facilitate revolutionary action when the time comes. Also, there's an article here which is almost completely dedicated to raking Kropotkin through the coals and criticizing some of his ideas including his support for the first world war and his lack of realism concerning how much teaching anarchists still have to do. Very gutsy and refreshing in a political environment where anarchists tend to always take the idealistic high road. It's clear that these anthology books are important. This one also manages to be exciting.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Samppa Sirnö

    Errico Malatesta's short essays about anarchy and anarchism. Malatesta was called after the I world war, when there was a revolutionary situation in Italy, "the Lenin of Italy". He refused to accept the siren call of authoritarian socialism and finally the fascists won and the anarchist factory occupation movement lost. This book gives you the background to understand this history and the ideas of anarchism in general. Errico Malatesta's short essays about anarchy and anarchism. Malatesta was called after the I world war, when there was a revolutionary situation in Italy, "the Lenin of Italy". He refused to accept the siren call of authoritarian socialism and finally the fascists won and the anarchist factory occupation movement lost. This book gives you the background to understand this history and the ideas of anarchism in general.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Fetch

    Essential

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robert Lowe

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  9. 4 out of 5

    Etienne Antikatastaseis

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jason Day

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

  12. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  13. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  14. 5 out of 5

    Zachary

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kpotkin

  16. 5 out of 5

    Left Sr

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nico B

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kris

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Nadeau

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Richard

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mycol

  23. 4 out of 5

    Corey

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dara Rohan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate Sharpley

  26. 5 out of 5

    Max

  27. 4 out of 5

    kiarnan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jon Xavier

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nat

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gregoris

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.