counter create hit Miera y Pacheco: A Renaissance Spaniard in Eighteenth-Century New Mexico - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Miera y Pacheco: A Renaissance Spaniard in Eighteenth-Century New Mexico

Availability: Ready to download

Remembered today as an early cartographer and prolific religious artist, don Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713–1785) engaged during his lifetime in a surprising array of other pursuits: engineer and militia captain on Indian campaigns, district officer, merchant, debt collector, metallurgist, luckless silver miner, presidial soldier, dam builder, and rancher. This long-ove Remembered today as an early cartographer and prolific religious artist, don Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713–1785) engaged during his lifetime in a surprising array of other pursuits: engineer and militia captain on Indian campaigns, district officer, merchant, debt collector, metallurgist, luckless silver miner, presidial soldier, dam builder, and rancher. This long-overdue, richly illustrated biography recounts Miera’s complex life in cinematic detail, from his birth in Cantabria, Spain, to his sudden and unexplained appearance at Janos, Chihuahua, and his death in Santa Fe at age seventy-one. In Miera y Pacheco, John L. Kessell explores each aspect of this Renaissance man’s life in the colony. Beginning with his marriage to the young descendant of a once-prominent New Mexican family, we see Miera transformed by his varied experiences into the quintessential Hispanic New Mexican. As he traveled to every corner of the colony and beyond, Miera gathered not only geographical, social, and political data but also invaluable information about the Southwest’s indigenous peoples. At the same time, Miera the artist was carving and painting statues and panels of the saints for the altar screens of the colony. Miera’s most ambitious surviving map resulted from his five-month ordeal as cartographer on the Domínguez-Escalante expedition to the Great Basin in 1776. Two years later, with the arrival of famed Juan Bautista de Anza as governor of New Mexico, Miera became a trusted member of Anza’s inner circle, advising him on civil, military, and Indian affairs. Miera’s maps and his religious art, represented here, have long been considered essential to the cultural history of colonial New Mexico. Now Kessell’s biography tells the rest of the story. Anyone with an interest in southwestern history, colonial New Mexico, or New Spain will welcome this study of Miera y Pacheco’s eventful life and times.


Compare

Remembered today as an early cartographer and prolific religious artist, don Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713–1785) engaged during his lifetime in a surprising array of other pursuits: engineer and militia captain on Indian campaigns, district officer, merchant, debt collector, metallurgist, luckless silver miner, presidial soldier, dam builder, and rancher. This long-ove Remembered today as an early cartographer and prolific religious artist, don Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713–1785) engaged during his lifetime in a surprising array of other pursuits: engineer and militia captain on Indian campaigns, district officer, merchant, debt collector, metallurgist, luckless silver miner, presidial soldier, dam builder, and rancher. This long-overdue, richly illustrated biography recounts Miera’s complex life in cinematic detail, from his birth in Cantabria, Spain, to his sudden and unexplained appearance at Janos, Chihuahua, and his death in Santa Fe at age seventy-one. In Miera y Pacheco, John L. Kessell explores each aspect of this Renaissance man’s life in the colony. Beginning with his marriage to the young descendant of a once-prominent New Mexican family, we see Miera transformed by his varied experiences into the quintessential Hispanic New Mexican. As he traveled to every corner of the colony and beyond, Miera gathered not only geographical, social, and political data but also invaluable information about the Southwest’s indigenous peoples. At the same time, Miera the artist was carving and painting statues and panels of the saints for the altar screens of the colony. Miera’s most ambitious surviving map resulted from his five-month ordeal as cartographer on the Domínguez-Escalante expedition to the Great Basin in 1776. Two years later, with the arrival of famed Juan Bautista de Anza as governor of New Mexico, Miera became a trusted member of Anza’s inner circle, advising him on civil, military, and Indian affairs. Miera’s maps and his religious art, represented here, have long been considered essential to the cultural history of colonial New Mexico. Now Kessell’s biography tells the rest of the story. Anyone with an interest in southwestern history, colonial New Mexico, or New Spain will welcome this study of Miera y Pacheco’s eventful life and times.

24 review for Miera y Pacheco: A Renaissance Spaniard in Eighteenth-Century New Mexico

  1. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Campbell

    I've read several books about Miera and traveled around the New Mexico area looking for his art work. He is one of my ancestors so when I was transferred to Albuquerque, it became a mission for me to find out more information about this fascinating man. This book offered information that I hadn't found except I'm still curious what brought him here. I had always imagined that he was probably a second or third son and wouldn't be inheriting the family property or that a love had gone sour. Still I've read several books about Miera and traveled around the New Mexico area looking for his art work. He is one of my ancestors so when I was transferred to Albuquerque, it became a mission for me to find out more information about this fascinating man. This book offered information that I hadn't found except I'm still curious what brought him here. I had always imagined that he was probably a second or third son and wouldn't be inheriting the family property or that a love had gone sour. Still up to my imagination I guess.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mackay

    Read as judge for the Colorado Book Awards.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  4. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jose Esquibel

  6. 4 out of 5

    Martha Hawkins

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rudy

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Phillips

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brisa

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  12. 4 out of 5

    Damien Aragon

  13. 5 out of 5

    William

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Myria

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sally Cervantez

  17. 5 out of 5

    Zedd

  18. 5 out of 5

    Beth Lakin

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessie Gonzales

  20. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Martinez

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt Fisher-Post

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carol Hunter

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.