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It has been ten years since the magical Cataclysm, which destroyed the twin strongholds of the two world's most powerful Mages, killing Urtho, creator of the gryphons, and sending his forces into exile. Now Urthro's peoples--human and non-human alike live in a terraced city carved into the face of a gleaming white cliff on the edge of the Western Ocean. Secure at least, .. It has been ten years since the magical Cataclysm, which destroyed the twin strongholds of the two world's most powerful Mages, killing Urtho, creator of the gryphons, and sending his forces into exile. Now Urthro's peoples--human and non-human alike live in a terraced city carved into the face of a gleaming white cliff on the edge of the Western Ocean. Secure at least, ...until the fleet of the mysterious Black Kings appears in their harbor, bringing envoys who inform the residents of White Gryphon that their newfound home lies on the northern perimeter of lands claimed by this powerful kingdom. Desperate not to lose their hard won home, Skandranon, along with his longtime friend Amberdrake--agree to accompany the envoys back to the Court of the Black Kings, hoping to negotiate an alliance. ...When a high ranking noble who opposes this alliance is found murdered--Skandranon and Amberdrake realize that they are up against unknown enemies who will stop at nothing, even the use of diabolical Blood Magic, to destroy White Gryphon.


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It has been ten years since the magical Cataclysm, which destroyed the twin strongholds of the two world's most powerful Mages, killing Urtho, creator of the gryphons, and sending his forces into exile. Now Urthro's peoples--human and non-human alike live in a terraced city carved into the face of a gleaming white cliff on the edge of the Western Ocean. Secure at least, .. It has been ten years since the magical Cataclysm, which destroyed the twin strongholds of the two world's most powerful Mages, killing Urtho, creator of the gryphons, and sending his forces into exile. Now Urthro's peoples--human and non-human alike live in a terraced city carved into the face of a gleaming white cliff on the edge of the Western Ocean. Secure at least, ...until the fleet of the mysterious Black Kings appears in their harbor, bringing envoys who inform the residents of White Gryphon that their newfound home lies on the northern perimeter of lands claimed by this powerful kingdom. Desperate not to lose their hard won home, Skandranon, along with his longtime friend Amberdrake--agree to accompany the envoys back to the Court of the Black Kings, hoping to negotiate an alliance. ...When a high ranking noble who opposes this alliance is found murdered--Skandranon and Amberdrake realize that they are up against unknown enemies who will stop at nothing, even the use of diabolical Blood Magic, to destroy White Gryphon.

30 review for The White Gryphon

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    Can not develop any interest in it. Not the book‘s fault. DNF after 17 pages and 11 years of languishing on my bookshelf.

  2. 4 out of 5

    D Dyer

    The second book in this trilogy is a huge deviation from the first. It’s much more of a mystery with lots of political maneuvering then it’s more action-packed predecessor. Skan and Drake are back, 10 years after the events in the black gryphon and their lives are now complicated by the need to lead the city they’ve founded. That complication increases when they discover that the land they have claimed is at the edge of an empire and they must travel to negotiate with the emperor. It was interest The second book in this trilogy is a huge deviation from the first. It’s much more of a mystery with lots of political maneuvering then it’s more action-packed predecessor. Skan and Drake are back, 10 years after the events in the black gryphon and their lives are now complicated by the need to lead the city they’ve founded. That complication increases when they discover that the land they have claimed is at the edge of an empire and they must travel to negotiate with the emperor. It was interesting to see these characters grow and get a sense of their capacity for political maneuvering but their growth is at the expense of other characters. Their respective partners, some of my favorite characters from the previous book, are pretty too-dimensional here. This is also a much more slow-paced Book with most of the action happening at the end. I would have appreciated more moments of tension throughout the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shelby

    Skandranon I do so adore you, you arrogant bird. This is such a different story from the first. The first book in this series is all about the war and how they were all going to survive the total destruction Ma'ar wanted. Now it's 10 years later and the Kaled'a'in Clan k'Leysha and those who escaped with them have established a new city on the coast far south of the land they fled. While construction of the city isn't complete they are starting to finally find a balance evil with magic being com Skandranon I do so adore you, you arrogant bird. This is such a different story from the first. The first book in this series is all about the war and how they were all going to survive the total destruction Ma'ar wanted. Now it's 10 years later and the Kaled'a'in Clan k'Leysha and those who escaped with them have established a new city on the coast far south of the land they fled. While construction of the city isn't complete they are starting to finally find a balance evil with magic being completely unreliable with the mage storms still throwing everything into chaos. Everything seems to be going well except Skan is BORED (not that he recognizes it ;)), right up until a ship sails into their harbor and declares they've cultivated territory that doesn't belong to them. I really enjoyed Amberdrake and Skan's travails as they tiptoed their way through the Haighlei Emperors court. They had to figure out a new way to deal with things and of course nothing can go smoothly. Of course now they have to outwit a murderer who is making it appear they themselves are causing the crime. These characters are so great that they just take over for me. I get lost in the story and it just makes me happy. I really loved this story and how they're all finding a new balance. Skan made me smile many times in this story as the White Gryphon found his way back to who he was and the great Black Gryphon returned.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Loveable characters are back (view spoiler)[with kids! (hide spoiler)] Thoroughly enjoyable and an easy read, I was cheering for the main characters at the end and I loved how Lackey wrote Kechara I actually think it is the strongest book of the three. It also helped that it was more mystery and suspense, which is one of my favourite genres. Also really quite fun/funny in some parts. A nice take on civilisations meeting. It is written for teens so keep that it mind. (The bad guys are bad, the Loveable characters are back (view spoiler)[with kids! (hide spoiler)] Thoroughly enjoyable and an easy read, I was cheering for the main characters at the end and I loved how Lackey wrote Kechara <3 I actually think it is the strongest book of the three. It also helped that it was more mystery and suspense, which is one of my favourite genres. Also really quite fun/funny in some parts. A nice take on civilisations meeting. It is written for teens so keep that it mind. (The bad guys are bad, the good guys are good! Can do no wrong/right).

  5. 4 out of 5

    David H.

    Set ten years after The Black Gryphon, the k'Leshya and friends are building a new city of refuge in the aftermath of the Cataclysm. Unlike the first book, which was more of a war story (though not quite), this one ended up being more of a court intrigue story as the city of White Gryphon discovers their very powerful new neighbors. This one was a relatively fun exploration of meeting new peoples with the added mystery of who's committing those murders at court... Skandranon and Amberdrake are the Set ten years after The Black Gryphon, the k'Leshya and friends are building a new city of refuge in the aftermath of the Cataclysm. Unlike the first book, which was more of a war story (though not quite), this one ended up being more of a court intrigue story as the city of White Gryphon discovers their very powerful new neighbors. This one was a relatively fun exploration of meeting new peoples with the added mystery of who's committing those murders at court... Skandranon and Amberdrake are the main characters again in this book, and it's interesting to see what the years and circumstances have made of them. Even though a lot of the focus is on the fear and anticipation of change among the Haighlei Empire, it applies just as equally to Skan and Drake, and that is something I'll always love about this book. The main flaw I had with this book was the "mystery" seemed rather limited (you find out who's doing it almost from the start).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Page

    Beware, there are spoilers for The Black Gryphon in this review. The war with the evil mage Ma’ar is over and Urtho is dead, but his people have survived. Spread as far across the world as they can, the Shin’a’in tribes must build new homes after theirs was destroyed in a huge magic explosion. We catch up with the gryphon Skandranon, whose feathers are now white after being bleached by the magic gate he crossed to escape the cataclysm in The Black Gryphon. In The White Gryphon, we begin ten years Beware, there are spoilers for The Black Gryphon in this review. The war with the evil mage Ma’ar is over and Urtho is dead, but his people have survived. Spread as far across the world as they can, the Shin’a’in tribes must build new homes after theirs was destroyed in a huge magic explosion. We catch up with the gryphon Skandranon, whose feathers are now white after being bleached by the magic gate he crossed to escape the cataclysm in The Black Gryphon. In The White Gryphon, we begin ten years after the cataclysm. Dubbed king of their new city, the white gryphon sets aside battle and glory for resolving minor conflicts and meetings. He’s not pleased. Skandranon and his human friend Amberdrake both have children now. They’re out of shape. They are bureaucrats. Ew. That is when a strange ship approaches their city, a ship filled with men and women with black skin claiming the new city is on the very outer edge of their nation. It’s so far away from the people in the nation and took ten years to build, so Skan and Drake are not about to back down. Instead, they go with the foreign people to their nation called Haighlei, ruled by a king. Tradition is key; Haighlei only allows change once every twenty years during an eclipse, so the people can seem backward to the more progressive Shin’a’in. Shortly after the arrival of Skan’s and Drake’s families, there is a murder in the Haighlei palace. Then another. And another. There weren’t murders before these newcomers, and surely magic was involved, perhaps a kind of magic the Haighlei don’t understand. That’s not possible, though, as the cataclysm still produces aftershocks called mage storms that destroy all spells and make it impossible to use magic. Still, accusations ensue, and Skan and Drake must be careful about ruining their chances of an alliance and maintaining peace. In my review of The Black Gryphon I complained that I couldn’t tell the cultures of various people apart. Because Ma’ar was conquering loads of land, varied people huddled near Urtho’s tower, suggesting they would not all have the same culture. In The White Gryphon I was pleased to see comparisons between the Shin’a’in and Haighlei — their dress, customs, caste system, ruling class, etc. A servant named Makke, who is more suited to caring for children but was labeled a cleaning woman, is a good example of how Haighlei might need to update their society. Makke can be punished fiercely for losing a single item of laundry, but her closeness to Skan’s family means she provides valuable information for the story. Although Lackey and Dixon tend to keep their villains in the realm of mustache twisting and mua-ha-ha-ing, this time she gave us someone who scared me. When he had a victim under his control, I never knew if he would talk until help arrived or if he was going to carve someone to pieces. I hadn’t been that worried about the villain since The Last Herald-Mage trilogy, when someone was killing off my favorite characters. While Makke and the villain stood out, once again the main characters seemed stock. Amberdrake could be any one of the previous Shin’a’in we’ve met in the Valdemar books, and his partner, Winterhart, seems like a standard pretty white lady with good manners. Here, Lackey and Dixon have missed an opportunity. Drake is supposed to play any role that soothes his clients. If they need a friend, lover, good listener, a slap of reality, sternness — he should be able to act, like a character in a play. He’s completely a home base guy, not militaristic, so he should always appear weak physically, to some degree, and perhaps more pacifistic. Winterhart was very good at playing a role in The Black Gryphon. She hid the fact that she was born a court lady and pretended to be a rough-and-tough gryphon healer. Although she was miserable in her false identity, she was convincing. In The White Gryphon, it’s assumed the Drake and Skan are the leaders of their new city, making them and their families royalty. I would assume Winterhart would revel in delight in her private quarters with Amberdrake, or at least compare her two lives. Instead, she seems like most other female leads in the Valdemar books. The authors’ writing is redeemed when Amberdrake has to do something rash and brave and he complains the whole time. THAT was what I was looking for! This guy should be so focused on his job as a therapist/masseur/empath that all the murders and political drama should send him running for a hidey hole. And that is my beef with Valdemar books lately. I see potential. It’s everywhere, and it doesn’t even know it’s potential. You may wonder why I keep reading the Valdemar books. Surely, I can ditch the readalong and convince Jackie to try another series with me. But I don’t want to. Much like rooting for a favorite team that seems to lose too often, Valdemar books fill me with hope. For every shot the characters take and miss, I have a moment of almost jumping up to whoop and cheer! The biggest disappointment? The numerous painful typos, such as calling Skan “Skin.” What do I look forward to with the conclusion of The Mage Wars trilogy? Well, I have no clue who the “silver gryphon” of The Silver Gryphon is. A new character? Another Skan transformation? We’ll find out. This review was originally posted at Grab the Lapels.

  7. 5 out of 5

    April

    I am re-reading Valdemar from the beginning and looking forward to it! This is a big change in setting and tone from The Black Gryphon, but I still really enjoyed it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ria Bridges

    It’s been a while since I’ve done any work on the Great Valdemar Reread, but now I’m back at it. Can’t let these books languish, after all! The White Gryphon is the second book of the Mage Wars trilogy, set back in Velgarth’s prehistory. The war itself has ended. Urtho and Ma’ar have been destroyed, and the Kaled’a’in have wandered far to find a new home. Finally they’ve found it, and built into cliff the city they would go on to call White Gryphon, in honour of Skandranon’s new magic-bleached co It’s been a while since I’ve done any work on the Great Valdemar Reread, but now I’m back at it. Can’t let these books languish, after all! The White Gryphon is the second book of the Mage Wars trilogy, set back in Velgarth’s prehistory. The war itself has ended. Urtho and Ma’ar have been destroyed, and the Kaled’a’in have wandered far to find a new home. Finally they’ve found it, and built into cliff the city they would go on to call White Gryphon, in honour of Skandranon’s new magic-bleached colouring. That’s where this book begins. It doesn’t stay there long. Most of the book takes place in the lands of the Haighlei, a race of very dark-skinned people from the south, who have a very rigid and intriguing culture. Change can only come when the gods will it, and the opportunity is always at the height of a solar eclipse. Which, coincidentally, is shortly after the White Gryphon envoys make their first appearance at the court of King Shalaman. But diplomatic relations aren’t the only thing they have to worry about. Soon after their arrival, a madman starts visiously murdering members of Shalaman’s court, casting suspicion on the newcomers. A very typical point of politic intrigue in fantasy novels, but Lackey makes it interesting nevertheless, especially in the setting of a new and — to those from White Gryphon — bafflingly rigid culture. The tale is told as Lackey tells many of her stories from the Valdemar series – with shifting viewpoints so that we get to see into the mind of nearly every major player in the story. While that does allow us access to information and insight into the characters, it does make it so that very little comes as a surprise, and unfortunately worked against the attempt to build tension. At first the reader isn’t sure who’s committing the murders. Then we’re told. Then the only issue becomes how and when is the murderer going to be caught. But even then, if you’ve read any of Lackey’s novels in the past, you can pretty much predict the ‘when’ of that, because of Lackey’s love of happy endings. I love a happy ending as much as the next person, and it can be nice to read things where you know everything will turn out all right in the end, but when you’re trying to build tension and mystery, that style doesn’t work quite so well. My main beef with this story is the sheer amount of suspension of disbelief you have to use in order to make all the pieces fit. First, a madman is cast out of White Gryphon, left in the wilds with only a couple of weapons, and common sense dictates that he’s probably going to die, since the lands are warped and wild and he’s just barely equipped to try to handle them. But somehow he travels south in safety, ending in the very same city that Amberdrake and Skan and the rest eventually go. He has no reason to go there. Nobody knows that the Haighlei kingdoms even exist in that area until after he’s removed from the city. And he also has vowed revenge against Amberdrake and the other citizens of White Gryphon, which would have been better served by staying in the area. It’s an awful stretch of the imagination to think that they all ended up in the same place at the same time like that, and that thought nagged at me from the moment that he is revealed as the killer. But while that is an awfully big pill to swallow, some of it was made up for by the interesting culture that Lackey set up when she created the Haighlei. I’ve always said that one of Lackey’s strongest suits is world- and culture-building, and it shows quite well here. She’s written numerous stories with a fish-out-of-water element to them, but rarely is it on such a grand scale, and it was fun to read about everybody getting baffled by everybody else. So while this book did have one major fault that I just can’t overlook, on the whole it was still written well, with the same smooth and engaging tone that I’ve come to expect whenever I read any of Lackey’s works. This isn’t particularly an essential book to the Velgarth/Valdemar books as a whole, since I believe the Haighlei get mentioned in maybe one or two other places besides this, and the Kaled’a’in disappear from history for centuries anyway, but essential or not, it was still a good read, and not one that I would voluntarily skip over.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    The book begins ten years after the cataclysm that ended the life of Urtho and, possibly, Ma'ar. Both Skandranon, and Amberdrake, along with their lifemates, Zhaneel and Winterheart, and also now with their children, have settled further west and south, from the site of the cataclysm, on the rocky coastline where they, and the other survivors who had escaped through their Gates, were slowly building a city on, and through, the chalky cliffs there. Skandranon is Leader, with the help of a Council, The book begins ten years after the cataclysm that ended the life of Urtho and, possibly, Ma'ar. Both Skandranon, and Amberdrake, along with their lifemates, Zhaneel and Winterheart, and also now with their children, have settled further west and south, from the site of the cataclysm, on the rocky coastline where they, and the other survivors who had escaped through their Gates, were slowly building a city on, and through, the chalky cliffs there. Skandranon is Leader, with the help of a Council, consisting of Amberdrake, Winterheart, Zhaneel, the Kaled'a'in Mage, Snowstar, and the former Commander of Urtho's army, Judeth. They have named their cliff-hugging city, White Gryphon, in honour of Skandranon's heroic effort to kill Ma'ar, which left him trapped inside the Gate for a short time, which bleached all of his feathers white. The book begins with the Council meeting, where they discuss the terrible Mage Storms, which have affected those with magic, since the cataclysm, by preventing them from using their gifts while the storms rage. After the meeting, Skandranon and Amberdrake have to go with Judeth, to arrest a man, Hadanelith, whose most minor charge, was that of impersonating a kestra'chern, the same profession as Amberdrake - but it had been decided that banishment was to be his sentence, as he had been doing some very dark things tobcustomers, but had only been discovered when one of them found the courage to report him. Just after his arrest, and banishment, a strange ship is spied, coming towards the city's dock, and so Amberdrake and Skandranon go to meet the people in the ship. It turns out that the people were from the Kingdom of Haighlei, and White Gryphon had been built on the furthest reaches north of that country, and so representatives were being asked to go to meet their Emperor, in order to see whether they would be allowed to stay, or be forced to go. From this moment on, the storyline follows how both of these very different peoples try to adjust to each other - but it takes a series of vicious murders, where the motives and methods point to both Skandranon, and Amberdrake, as the murderers, that begin to show them all that people are just people,with all the same wants and needs, and that cooperation is always the best way to overcome differences! I really enjoyed this storyline, and loved the way that Mercedes Lackey has used these stories as a prequel, laying out the bones of her future works in these books. Once again, I couldn't remember any of the plot, do it was as if it was a first read. I'm really looking forward to reading the next book in the series: The Silver Gryphon!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jackie B. - Death by Tsundoku

    The majority of The White Gryphon takes place in the Haighlei Empire. The Haighlei have a cast society and it was interesting unpacking all the elements of their society with the envoy from White Gryphon. Lackey and Dixon's exploration of these ideas helped me as a reader to better understand how to embrace something new. Pitting these two very different cultures against each other and the political dance they had to complete to become friends was fascinating to behold. Alas, aside from this elem The majority of The White Gryphon takes place in the Haighlei Empire. The Haighlei have a cast society and it was interesting unpacking all the elements of their society with the envoy from White Gryphon. Lackey and Dixon's exploration of these ideas helped me as a reader to better understand how to embrace something new. Pitting these two very different cultures against each other and the political dance they had to complete to become friends was fascinating to behold. Alas, aside from this element, I found The White Gryphon to be an odd addition to Lackey's Valdemar universe. The characters were all… peculiar. Not just the new characters, but even our familiar faces! They were inconsistent; small events would happen and suddenly this character would act almost like an entirely new person! And the plot. Oy. The plot was so strange! It's like a bad murder mystery where the Scooby Gang decided to solve this without the police. Cue eye roll. I don't know why we needed this book in the Valdemar universe. This book seems to have very little, if anything, to do with the Mage Wars. The wars seem to have ended in The Black Gryphon! It adds nothing to our characters other than to introduce blood magic, which we know from previous books, and introduces the Haighlei Empire. Will they even matter in the next book? Who knows. I miss mind magic. I wonder if we will see the evolution of mind-magic being established in The Silver Gryphon? Probably not, as the Silver Gryphons are the name of the elite fighting force that defends the White Gryphon colony. While I like these characters a lot, I'm ready to move back into central Valdemar and the Heralds. I miss them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    A. Nixon

    I would have sworn that I'd already read this one. But I did not remember one iota. So weird. Anyway! So. After the action of THE BLACK GRYPHON the first half of this book just felt slowwwwwww to me. I don't read the political-kings-posturing stories because I do not like them and that's what this was for a lot of it. It got better once the action picked up but I think it probably could have been better with a faster pace. Also frustrating was Winterheart's character (or lack thereof). It seemed l I would have sworn that I'd already read this one. But I did not remember one iota. So weird. Anyway! So. After the action of THE BLACK GRYPHON the first half of this book just felt slowwwwwww to me. I don't read the political-kings-posturing stories because I do not like them and that's what this was for a lot of it. It got better once the action picked up but I think it probably could have been better with a faster pace. Also frustrating was Winterheart's character (or lack thereof). It seemed like all she was here to do in this book was serve as someone (view spoiler)[for men to fall in love with, shoving along the plot (hide spoiler)] , which is frustrating because she's cooler than that. This book was lacking in female characters for sure. So, yeah. I'm glad I read it to continue on the story of everybody but I might just skip it on my next Lackey re-read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dark-Draco

    I liked this book a lot better than the first in the trilogy (not that you needed to have read that one to enjoy this!). The story seemed to hold together a lot more and I loved the whole premise of making new allies. I probably would have worked more if the murderer had been introduced in the first book and not at the beginning of this, because it's all too obvious who is behind the grusome killings - a bit like when CSI has a famous guest actor - you all know they did it! That said, the how and I liked this book a lot better than the first in the trilogy (not that you needed to have read that one to enjoy this!). The story seemed to hold together a lot more and I loved the whole premise of making new allies. I probably would have worked more if the murderer had been introduced in the first book and not at the beginning of this, because it's all too obvious who is behind the grusome killings - a bit like when CSI has a famous guest actor - you all know they did it! That said, the how and why is still pretty mysterious and it was good following our heroes as they tried to discover who had set them up. It might be a quite simple book and simple plot, but very enjoyable nonetheless. Looking forward to reading the last book in the three.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kirsti

    This is probably one of my least favorite Mercedes Lackey books. Unlike the first book in this series, this one has almost no action and instead revolves around conversation- and mostly it's pretty boring. It goes something like this; "Hey how about we do this?" "Well, if we do that, then this will be affected, and then this person will be offended" "Well, what about this then?" and it goes on and on and nothing much actually gets done. There is plenty of thoughts, traditions and who is offendin This is probably one of my least favorite Mercedes Lackey books. Unlike the first book in this series, this one has almost no action and instead revolves around conversation- and mostly it's pretty boring. It goes something like this; "Hey how about we do this?" "Well, if we do that, then this will be affected, and then this person will be offended" "Well, what about this then?" and it goes on and on and nothing much actually gets done. There is plenty of thoughts, traditions and who is offending who, but not much actual story. I'm still going to read book three, because from memory it is much better than this one. Three stars!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Lillard

    It took me until my second read to really appreciate this book. The first time I read through it, I didn't care for the addition of a new set of characters and some of the context was disturbing and off-putting. I missed the old Skan and Amberdrake, the war heroes and leaders. This story shows what happens after all of that, when there is no fighting, and how those who grew up in war deal with the aftermath. It shows that building a new community isn't always easy or entertaining, but it's neces It took me until my second read to really appreciate this book. The first time I read through it, I didn't care for the addition of a new set of characters and some of the context was disturbing and off-putting. I missed the old Skan and Amberdrake, the war heroes and leaders. This story shows what happens after all of that, when there is no fighting, and how those who grew up in war deal with the aftermath. It shows that building a new community isn't always easy or entertaining, but it's necessary to understand that it isn't always glamorous. Yes, it's not the same exciting setting or story as The Black Gryphon, but a lighter read with darker undertones.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I finally finished this! Once it finally got moving it was quite an enjoyable book. But this is one of my least favourite Lackey novels. It just took too long setting up and there wasn't enough going on to keep my interest for the first half or so. I love how different it feels from the first one though, with this being more political manoeuvring/mysteryesque rather than straight fantasy. Also love the character growth of the MCs from the first one. I do love Amberdrake, Skan and their bromance I finally finished this! Once it finally got moving it was quite an enjoyable book. But this is one of my least favourite Lackey novels. It just took too long setting up and there wasn't enough going on to keep my interest for the first half or so. I love how different it feels from the first one though, with this being more political manoeuvring/mysteryesque rather than straight fantasy. Also love the character growth of the MCs from the first one. I do love Amberdrake, Skan and their bromance in particular. Glad I read it and look forward to reading the final book of this trilogy as well as moving along with this world. This one just won't ever be a favourite.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anita Fajita Pita

    This was not as good as The Black Gryphon, imo, however reading it again (about 20 years later) it still stood as a good read. It was little less magicky and a little more of a dark murder-mystery. And I actually gleaned more about the world of Valdemar from reading this as an adult, like I did with the first one - and I wonder how much of Vanyel's story I might "aha" if I reread them after this. I'm very curious to see how the third book will hold up for me, as I remember reading that one and th This was not as good as The Black Gryphon, imo, however reading it again (about 20 years later) it still stood as a good read. It was little less magicky and a little more of a dark murder-mystery. And I actually gleaned more about the world of Valdemar from reading this as an adult, like I did with the first one - and I wonder how much of Vanyel's story I might "aha" if I reread them after this. I'm very curious to see how the third book will hold up for me, as I remember reading that one and the first one again and again. I do remember not liking this one as much, but again, it was still a good book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristen (belles_bookshelves)

    "A noble heart is supposed to live and find joy in the responsibility." Not as good as The Black Gryphon, but compelling in a different way. The Black Gryphon is all action, all go, go, go!. The White Gryphon is all politics and mystery and detective work and who-done-it? It has the same slow start TBG had, but once the plot got rolling it just kept going and didn't stop.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    A good continuation of the series. I find the way that the author writes about certain things to be very interesting. She has a way of integrating things into her world seamlessly in a manner that makes them seem commonplace, though in the real world they were not. If you enjoyed the first book in this series, this is a good extension to that story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    This was a more interesting read than the first one, more action and direct involvement with the events that mattered. It was less about support personnel and their thoughts about what was going on around them and not knowing anything as the main characters were somewhere else, to being a mystery that the characters were actively involved in trying to deal with and solve.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kate H

    I like the books Mercedes Lackey writes, she is good at creating a believable world and people to populate it. While her writing is not the strongest I do find it engaging ang and enjoyable. I like a series I can live inside of and her books are ones that have characters I feel invested in and a world I believe could exist.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gala Bond

    Too long. Plot was in the first and last 3 chapters. I really didn't need the survival guide in the middle. I love her books but I was really only finished it because I had nothing else to read on the plane.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    Extremely clever interweaving of architecture and uncomfortable hero-hood in association with the name of the town and title of the book. The black emperors are fascinating. I feared for our heroes many times, and admired their cleverness and fortitude. Thorough, original world-building.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    PopSugar Reading Challenge 2017 | Task 17: Book involving a mythical creature

  24. 5 out of 5

    Data

    I didn't hate it or anything, but it's pretty thin on all accounts.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Peggy Thomson

    It had a pivotal character which I wanted to spend no time at all with.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Glendia Rae Manka

    Read this series years ago in paperback. Loved it. Wish there were more stories about the Gryphons

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kat Hooper

    Will review at www.fantasyliterature.com. Will review at www.fantasyliterature.com.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Linda A.

    This is a Valdemar book that takes the characters into a deeply different culture. Fascinating!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Loved this series in high school! Got started on a rereading kick after the new Family Spies book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shaunda

    The continuation of a great story.

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