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Giselle and the Fate of Wahine

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It was a day before Easter, April 1968, when journalist Emma Cassidy boarded the inter-island ferry, Wahine, sailing from Christchurch's port of Lyttelton to Wellington. On the bridge Captain Angus Robertson, after reading a satisfactory weather report on Cyclone Giselle, orders Wahine's departure. The ship, with over 300 passengers and crew, makes her way up the eastern c It was a day before Easter, April 1968, when journalist Emma Cassidy boarded the inter-island ferry, Wahine, sailing from Christchurch's port of Lyttelton to Wellington. On the bridge Captain Angus Robertson, after reading a satisfactory weather report on Cyclone Giselle, orders Wahine's departure. The ship, with over 300 passengers and crew, makes her way up the eastern coastline of New Zealand battling high seas and torrential rain - not the uneventful night crossing expected. Unbeknown to Robertson, Giselle had changed her course and was heading directly for the ferry. Wellington Harbor Master, Samuel Galloway reads the weather report and contacts Wahine informing Robertson of Giselle's course change. As the ship fights the gigantic waves, unrelenting intense rain and a cyclonic wind, she is pushed off course. Emma must now fight for not only her own life but for the lives of her cabin mate Janice Greenway, and a befriended family of three. With the city of Wellington at a standstill, the entire nation waits for News of Wahine's fate. Emma, not satisfied to just sit and wait, fights the apathy of other passengers and the reassurances of 1st officer Peter Knight and crew. Follow Emma, Robertson and Galloway as they fight the monster Giselle.


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It was a day before Easter, April 1968, when journalist Emma Cassidy boarded the inter-island ferry, Wahine, sailing from Christchurch's port of Lyttelton to Wellington. On the bridge Captain Angus Robertson, after reading a satisfactory weather report on Cyclone Giselle, orders Wahine's departure. The ship, with over 300 passengers and crew, makes her way up the eastern c It was a day before Easter, April 1968, when journalist Emma Cassidy boarded the inter-island ferry, Wahine, sailing from Christchurch's port of Lyttelton to Wellington. On the bridge Captain Angus Robertson, after reading a satisfactory weather report on Cyclone Giselle, orders Wahine's departure. The ship, with over 300 passengers and crew, makes her way up the eastern coastline of New Zealand battling high seas and torrential rain - not the uneventful night crossing expected. Unbeknown to Robertson, Giselle had changed her course and was heading directly for the ferry. Wellington Harbor Master, Samuel Galloway reads the weather report and contacts Wahine informing Robertson of Giselle's course change. As the ship fights the gigantic waves, unrelenting intense rain and a cyclonic wind, she is pushed off course. Emma must now fight for not only her own life but for the lives of her cabin mate Janice Greenway, and a befriended family of three. With the city of Wellington at a standstill, the entire nation waits for News of Wahine's fate. Emma, not satisfied to just sit and wait, fights the apathy of other passengers and the reassurances of 1st officer Peter Knight and crew. Follow Emma, Robertson and Galloway as they fight the monster Giselle.

1 review for Giselle and the Fate of Wahine

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Herbert

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