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Egyptian Foreign Policy From Mubarak to Morsi: Against the National Interest

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Egyptian Foreign Policy from Mubarak to Morsi explores an area rarely touched upon by researchers, the relationship between regime security and the national interest. Concentrating on Egyptian foreign policy under President Hosni Mubarak, this book analyses how it was used to bolster his internal hold on power. In considering Egyptian foreign policy, two central case studie Egyptian Foreign Policy from Mubarak to Morsi explores an area rarely touched upon by researchers, the relationship between regime security and the national interest. Concentrating on Egyptian foreign policy under President Hosni Mubarak, this book analyses how it was used to bolster his internal hold on power. In considering Egyptian foreign policy, two central case studies are examined. Firstly, Egypt's reluctance to re-establish diplomatic ties with Iran, and secondly, Egypt's response to the efforts of the Bush administration in promoting political reform in the Middle East. When examining these case studies the impact of different societal factors on decision-making is taken into consideration, highlighting the role of business groups and the security apparatus in foreign policy decision-making. Concluding with a discussion of Egypt's foreign policy in the first year of Mohamed Morsi's rule, and arguing that it has departed little from Mubarak's policy, this book is a vital resource for anyone interested in contemporary Egyptian politics, Middle East Studies and International Relations more broadly.


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Egyptian Foreign Policy from Mubarak to Morsi explores an area rarely touched upon by researchers, the relationship between regime security and the national interest. Concentrating on Egyptian foreign policy under President Hosni Mubarak, this book analyses how it was used to bolster his internal hold on power. In considering Egyptian foreign policy, two central case studie Egyptian Foreign Policy from Mubarak to Morsi explores an area rarely touched upon by researchers, the relationship between regime security and the national interest. Concentrating on Egyptian foreign policy under President Hosni Mubarak, this book analyses how it was used to bolster his internal hold on power. In considering Egyptian foreign policy, two central case studies are examined. Firstly, Egypt's reluctance to re-establish diplomatic ties with Iran, and secondly, Egypt's response to the efforts of the Bush administration in promoting political reform in the Middle East. When examining these case studies the impact of different societal factors on decision-making is taken into consideration, highlighting the role of business groups and the security apparatus in foreign policy decision-making. Concluding with a discussion of Egypt's foreign policy in the first year of Mohamed Morsi's rule, and arguing that it has departed little from Mubarak's policy, this book is a vital resource for anyone interested in contemporary Egyptian politics, Middle East Studies and International Relations more broadly.

10 review for Egyptian Foreign Policy From Mubarak to Morsi: Against the National Interest

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    In the latest addition to the Routledge Series in Middle Eastern Politics, Nael Shama expands upon his Ph.D. dissertation under the supervision of Raymond Hinnebusch at the University of St. Andrews and examines Egyptian foreign policy by investigating the relationship between regime security (as opposed to national security) and foreign policy decision-making. Shama outlines an extensive theoretical and historical framework, stretching from the 1952 Free Officer’s Coup, through the successive r In the latest addition to the Routledge Series in Middle Eastern Politics, Nael Shama expands upon his Ph.D. dissertation under the supervision of Raymond Hinnebusch at the University of St. Andrews and examines Egyptian foreign policy by investigating the relationship between regime security (as opposed to national security) and foreign policy decision-making. Shama outlines an extensive theoretical and historical framework, stretching from the 1952 Free Officer’s Coup, through the successive regimes of Gamal Abdel Nasser, Anwar Sadat and Hosni Mubarak. The work culminates by analysing post-Mubarak foreign policies of both the transitional Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) government and deposed president Mohamed Morsi’s year of rule. For his theoretical framework, Shama employs Realist Stephen Walt’s refinement of “balance of power” into “balance of threat” and expands the theory to the domestic sphere, taking into account internal threats. Shama also includes Steven R. David’s concept of “omnibalancing,” but criticizes the model’s oversimplification of leader behaviour and the assumption “that domestic threats are always more perilous than external threats” (18). Through his theoretical framework, Shama is able to overcome the limitations of both the psychological and bureaucratic-organisational schools of foreign policy analysis, the first of which excludes the operational environment, while the latter ignores societal factors, being confined strictly to the political elite (4-6). Using this framework, Shama argues that regime security is the key factor in understanding Egyptian foreign policy and that consecutive Egyptian presidents placed the interests of the regime above state interests. It is argued that Egyptian foreign policy most often “omnibalanced” by appeasing external threats while mobilizing against urgent internal threats, with response and policy ultimately being dictated by level of (perceived) threat. Read the full review here: https://almiraah.wordpress.com/2014/1...

  2. 5 out of 5

    H

  3. 5 out of 5

    Reesya D.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rania

  6. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad Farrag (zahravius)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aya Riyad

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sherif MohyEldeen

  9. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Robinson

  10. 4 out of 5

    Wierish Ramsoekh

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