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Woody Allen made the glamour of Paris in the twenties magical in Midnight In Paris—but was that really the case? The Lost Generation made up one of the most fascinating, eccentric, and diverse group of writers ever known—Ernest Hemmingway, James Joyce, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, and so many more collectively made up this artistic period in time. In this book, you wil Woody Allen made the glamour of Paris in the twenties magical in Midnight In Paris—but was that really the case? The Lost Generation made up one of the most fascinating, eccentric, and diverse group of writers ever known—Ernest Hemmingway, James Joyce, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, and so many more collectively made up this artistic period in time. In this book, you will learn how and why the movement started, what it was like to be a writer in Paris, and what led to its fall. A list of essential reading from the period is also included in the book.


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Woody Allen made the glamour of Paris in the twenties magical in Midnight In Paris—but was that really the case? The Lost Generation made up one of the most fascinating, eccentric, and diverse group of writers ever known—Ernest Hemmingway, James Joyce, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, and so many more collectively made up this artistic period in time. In this book, you wil Woody Allen made the glamour of Paris in the twenties magical in Midnight In Paris—but was that really the case? The Lost Generation made up one of the most fascinating, eccentric, and diverse group of writers ever known—Ernest Hemmingway, James Joyce, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, and so many more collectively made up this artistic period in time. In this book, you will learn how and why the movement started, what it was like to be a writer in Paris, and what led to its fall. A list of essential reading from the period is also included in the book.

57 review for The Real Midnight In Paris: A History of the Expatriate

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alina

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Several months ago I wrote a Romanian review for Woody Allen’s film, Midnight in Paris, which is one of my favourite movies of all time. Due to this amazing film and also due to my fascination with the City of Lights, I bought a short literary guide in e-book format, entitled The Real Midnight in Paris, written by Paul Brody. The author explains who the expatriates were and why they settled in Paris after the Great War ended instead of returning to their homeland. “This group of young artists, mo Several months ago I wrote a Romanian review for Woody Allen’s film, Midnight in Paris, which is one of my favourite movies of all time. Due to this amazing film and also due to my fascination with the City of Lights, I bought a short literary guide in e-book format, entitled The Real Midnight in Paris, written by Paul Brody. The author explains who the expatriates were and why they settled in Paris after the Great War ended instead of returning to their homeland. “This group of young artists, most of them born between 1895 and 1900, would become known as the Lost Generation. In 1920s, Paris, they were all between 20 and 30 years old and eager to test the boundaries of life” (p. 1). As the previous quote already suggests, these young people had a strong interest in arts, especially literature that brought them together as well as “the seismic shift in culture that signalled the painful birth of the Modern World” (Idem). Probably no one anticipated then that the First World War and the Second World War would dramatically change the way people used to live, their culture in general, politics, mentalities and so on. But the Great War was the first historical event where most of the men belonging to the middle class had to fight. We should mention here writers such as Ernest Hemingway or Wilfred Owen, who died in the line of duty. Thus, traumas, disillusions and frustrations linked to the war not only left their mark on the young survivors’ minds, but they also influenced and shaped the works they created. Moreover, these intellectuals, who came from restrictive and conservative countries, saw Paris as the refuge they needed, due to the “climate of intellectual freedom and experimentation was unlike anywhere else in the Western world” (p. 2). Because of this, thousands of American and European expatriates flocked to the City of Lights, where they could experiment, share and debate with other artists their outstanding ideas in the now famous literary salons, cafes and publishing houses. Besides the modernity and freedom for artists and their arts, Paris also reminded them of the Old World, with its charming boulevards and the ornate buildings of the 19th century, that became the cliché image of the Romantic Paris, which some of us love and others hate. In the first two chapters, you will read about the historical background of the Great War, the post-war effects that led artists and writers like those who will establish the Avant-garde movement to move to Paris, the most important Salons, Cafes and Bookshops – such as Sylvia Beach’s bookshop Shakespeare and Company and “Gertrude Stein’s Saturday evening salons” (p. 13). In such gathering places, literature and art radically deviated from the traditional norms and principles, thanks to the outburst of various movements we still recognize today: Cubism, Dadaism or Surrealism. Next, you will learn which historical factors put an end to the Lost Generation, then Paul Broody gives you some essential information about the Forerunners of the Lost Generation such as T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, James Joyce. Later on, in the chapter Primary Representatives of the Lost Generation, you will read about Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and other writers and artists. The final factual chapter ends the study with the Critical Reception regarding the works of the Lost Generation. Before I go, I must add that this study was pretty good. Some would say it is too short, but I think that, for a beginner, it is a guide that gives you a taste of the 20s and if you are longing for more, you have the seventh chapter where you can find enough titles for further reading, such as the works of the main writers of the Lost Generation. If you need to better understand this literary period, but don’t want to read too much, this guide may be the book for you. http://elitere.ro/the-real-midnight-i...

  2. 5 out of 5

    GotMyReservations

    At 74 pages with references, this book is a little primer for the reader who wants to learn more about the Lost Generation of writers. Riding on the coattails of Woody Allen's movie, it gives brief biographies and a reading list for the most famous of the expatriate community in Paris and London during the 1920s and early thirties. At 74 pages with references, this book is a little primer for the reader who wants to learn more about the Lost Generation of writers. Riding on the coattails of Woody Allen's movie, it gives brief biographies and a reading list for the most famous of the expatriate community in Paris and London during the 1920s and early thirties.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Haythem Bastawy

    A very helpful guide to the lost generation of literature! The Real Midnight in Paris is precise and concise and delivers a panoramic view with quick snapshots on each author/artist and their most relevant works.

  4. 4 out of 5

    JJ

    The book was short and sweet and gave a brief (but concise) outline of the war, life in Paris in the 1920s and all of the "major players". For someone who just wants a brief little intro into this decade and the lost generation. This is a good start. The book was short and sweet and gave a brief (but concise) outline of the war, life in Paris in the 1920s and all of the "major players". For someone who just wants a brief little intro into this decade and the lost generation. This is a good start.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    This book gave me an overview of the authors of the Lost Generation. Now I'm determined to read at least one work written by each of the highlighted authors. This book gave me an overview of the authors of the Lost Generation. Now I'm determined to read at least one work written by each of the highlighted authors.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Only because I was starting to realize what a shit-hole of a place I was sometimes living in.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I enjoyed reading this and it led me to discover other books to read since it is largely a book about 1920s authors.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Written more like a Wikepedia entry. Factual, not fun.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Blanca

    A great book to get a general vision of what Paris in the 20's was. A great book to get a general vision of what Paris in the 20's was.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    It was really boring. Just facts about the Lost Generation

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alain Chappaz

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brigitte

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary A. Rogers

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Williams Hay

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    Graciela T. Parsons

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    Morten Oddvik

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carly

  18. 5 out of 5

    Raymond R. Cosner

  19. 4 out of 5

    Randy Keith

  20. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Corrine

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aleta

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tina O. Grande

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christiane

  25. 4 out of 5

    Liane Page

  26. 5 out of 5

    Francielly

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carrin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schneider

  29. 5 out of 5

    daniela rovira

  30. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

  31. 4 out of 5

    Geny-kate

  32. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Tennant

  33. 5 out of 5

    Montana

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    Deb

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    Heather Harrington

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    Rachel

  37. 5 out of 5

    Tim

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    Tamara

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    Jan C

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    Jo Kneale

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    Dave

  42. 5 out of 5

    Rexann

  43. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie-lee Moulin

  44. 5 out of 5

    Harriet

  45. 5 out of 5

    Serra

  46. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Lanctot

  47. 4 out of 5

    Lisagarden

  48. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  49. 4 out of 5

    Jane

  50. 5 out of 5

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  51. 4 out of 5

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  52. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  53. 4 out of 5

    Prim

  54. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  55. 5 out of 5

    Ishita Sood

  56. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

  57. 5 out of 5

    Garret Zastoupil

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