counter create hit Girls Coming to Tech!: A History of American Engineering Education for Women - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Girls Coming to Tech!: A History of American Engineering Education for Women

Availability: Ready to download

How women coped with both formal barriers and informal opposition to their entry into the traditionally masculine field of engineering in American higher education.Engineering education in the United States was long regarded as masculine territory. For decades, women who studied or worked in engineering were popularly perceived as oddities, outcasts, unfeminine (or inappro How women coped with both formal barriers and informal opposition to their entry into the traditionally masculine field of engineering in American higher education.Engineering education in the United States was long regarded as masculine territory. For decades, women who studied or worked in engineering were popularly perceived as oddities, outcasts, unfeminine (or inappropriately feminine in a male world). In Girls Coming to Tech!, Amy Bix tells the story of how women gained entrance to the traditionally male field of engineering in American higher education. As Bix explains, a few women breached the gender-reinforced boundaries of engineering education before World War II. During World War II, government, employers, and colleges actively recruited women to train as engineering aides, channeling them directly into defense work. These wartime training programs set the stage for more engineering schools to open their doors to women. Bix offers three detailed case studies of postwar engineering coeducation. Georgia Tech admitted women in 1952 to avoid a court case, over objections by traditionalists. In 1968, Caltech male students argued that nerds needed a civilizing female presence. At MIT, which had admitted women since the 1870s but treated them as a minor afterthought, feminist-era activists pushed the school to welcome more women and take their talent seriously. In the 1950s, women made up less than one percent of students in American engineering programs; in 2010 and 2011, women earned 18.4% of bachelor's degrees, 22.6% of master's degrees, and 21.8% of doctorates in engineering. Bix's account shows why these gains were hard won.


Compare

How women coped with both formal barriers and informal opposition to their entry into the traditionally masculine field of engineering in American higher education.Engineering education in the United States was long regarded as masculine territory. For decades, women who studied or worked in engineering were popularly perceived as oddities, outcasts, unfeminine (or inappro How women coped with both formal barriers and informal opposition to their entry into the traditionally masculine field of engineering in American higher education.Engineering education in the United States was long regarded as masculine territory. For decades, women who studied or worked in engineering were popularly perceived as oddities, outcasts, unfeminine (or inappropriately feminine in a male world). In Girls Coming to Tech!, Amy Bix tells the story of how women gained entrance to the traditionally male field of engineering in American higher education. As Bix explains, a few women breached the gender-reinforced boundaries of engineering education before World War II. During World War II, government, employers, and colleges actively recruited women to train as engineering aides, channeling them directly into defense work. These wartime training programs set the stage for more engineering schools to open their doors to women. Bix offers three detailed case studies of postwar engineering coeducation. Georgia Tech admitted women in 1952 to avoid a court case, over objections by traditionalists. In 1968, Caltech male students argued that nerds needed a civilizing female presence. At MIT, which had admitted women since the 1870s but treated them as a minor afterthought, feminist-era activists pushed the school to welcome more women and take their talent seriously. In the 1950s, women made up less than one percent of students in American engineering programs; in 2010 and 2011, women earned 18.4% of bachelor's degrees, 22.6% of master's degrees, and 21.8% of doctorates in engineering. Bix's account shows why these gains were hard won.

37 review for Girls Coming to Tech!: A History of American Engineering Education for Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Billy Marino

    More accurately a 4.5, maybe even 4.25, but either way, thoroughly enjoyed this well-researched and intriguing read!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Graham

    This is essential reading for anyone interested in engineering education, engineering as a field, or the history of technology in the United States. While I can find spots where I know the facts are a bit sloppily conveyed, in general it meets my standards from both historical and engineering standards. While the main focus is in the post-World War Two addition of women to three leading technical schools, it does cover the broader history of engineering education in the United States. From perso This is essential reading for anyone interested in engineering education, engineering as a field, or the history of technology in the United States. While I can find spots where I know the facts are a bit sloppily conveyed, in general it meets my standards from both historical and engineering standards. While the main focus is in the post-World War Two addition of women to three leading technical schools, it does cover the broader history of engineering education in the United States. From personal bias, I would have liked to see coverage of an engineering program in a major land-grant or similar university, whether it be Iowa State or something comparable. I'll have to think on what I've learned from this further.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donna Riley

  4. 4 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allan Olley

  6. 4 out of 5

    Armineh Noravian

  7. 4 out of 5

    Scott Hudson

  8. 4 out of 5

    RUPANTI

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Clark

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alysha

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  13. 4 out of 5

    Arti383

  14. 4 out of 5

    Margot

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marjorie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Helga

  18. 5 out of 5

    COM Library Rarian

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  20. 5 out of 5

    Annette Gonzalez

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Warren

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marecognitum

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pestozesto

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ana

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laura Jarboe

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sky

  27. 4 out of 5

    David Czuba

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barbra

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dennylou

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lin Ding

  31. 5 out of 5

    Aerin

  32. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

  33. 5 out of 5

    Nabila L

  34. 5 out of 5

    Mary Craighead

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie Wills

  36. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

  37. 5 out of 5

    Karen

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.