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RETURN FROM THE U. S. S. R. Also by Andre Gide THE COUNTERFEITERS THE IMMORALIST TRAVELS IN THE CONGO These are Borzoi Books published by ALFRED A. KNOPF I DEDICATE THESE PAGES TO THE MEMORY OF EUGENE DABIT, BESIDE WHOM, WITH WHOM, THEY WERE LIVED AND THOUGHT THE HOMERIC HYMN TO DEMETER relates how the great goddess, in the course of her wanderings in search of her daughte RETURN FROM THE U. S. S. R. Also by Andre Gide THE COUNTERFEITERS THE IMMORALIST TRAVELS IN THE CONGO These are Borzoi Books published by ALFRED A. KNOPF I DEDICATE THESE PAGES TO THE MEMORY OF EUGENE DABIT, BESIDE WHOM, WITH WHOM, THEY WERE LIVED AND THOUGHT THE HOMERIC HYMN TO DEMETER relates how the great goddess, in the course of her wanderings in search of her daughter, came to the court of Keleos. No one recognized the goddess under the borrowed form of a humble wet-nurse and Queen Metaneira entrusted to her care her latest-born child, the infant Demophoon, afterwards known as Triptolemus, the founder of agriculture. Every evening, behind closed doors, while the household was asleep, Demeter took little Demo phoon out of his comfortable cradle and with appar ent cruelty., though moved in reality by a great love 1 and desirous of bringing him eventually to the state of godhoodj laid the naked child on a glowing bed of embers. I imagine the mighty Demeter bending ma ternally over the radiant nursling as over the future race of mankind. He endures the fiery charcoal he gathers strength from the ordeal. Something super human is fostered in Mm, something robust, some thing beyond all hope glorious. Ah, had Demeter only been able to carry through her bold attempt, to bring her daring venture to a successful issue But Metaneira becoming anxious, says the legend, burst suddenly into the room where the experiment was be ing carried on and guided by her mistaken fears, thrust aside the goddess at her work of forging the superman j pushed away the embers , and, in order to save the child, lost the god. CONTENTS FOREWORD XI RETURN FROM THE U. S. S. R. 3 APPENDICES r. Speech Delivered on the Occasion of Maxim Gorkis Funeral 65 n. Speech to the Students of Moscow 70 in. Speech to the Men of Letters of Leningrad 74 iv. The Struggle against Religion 78 v. Ostrovski 83 vi. A Kolkhoz 86 vu. Bolshevo 89 vni. The Besprizornis 91 FOREWORD THREE YEARS AGO I declared my admiration, my love, for the U. S. S. R. An unprecedented experi ment was being attempted there which filled our hearts with hope and from which we expected an immense advance, an impetus capable of carrying forward in its stride the whole human race. It is indeed worth while living, I thought, in order to be present at this rebirth, and worth while giving ones life in order to help it on. In our hearts and in our minds we resolutely linked the future of culture itself with the glorious destiny of the U. S. S. R. We have frequently said so. We should have liked to repeat it once again, Already, without as yet having seen things for ourselves, we could not but feel disturbed by cer tain recent decisions which seemed to denote a change of orientation. At that moment October 1935 I wrote as fol lows It is largely moreover the stupidity and unfair xi Xll FOREWORD ness of the attacks on the U. S. S. R. that make us defend it with some obstinacy. Those same yelpers will begin to approve the Soviet Union just as we shall cease to do so for what they will approve are those very compromises and concessions which will make some others say There You see but which will lead away from the goal it had at first set itself. Let us hope that in order to keep our eyes fixed on that goal we may not be obliged to avert them from the Soviet Union Nouvelle Revue Frangaise, March 1936 Resolving, however, to maintain at all costs my confidence until I had more to go upon, and pre ferring to doubt my own judgment, I declared once more, four days after my arrival in Moscow, in my speech in the Red Square on the occasion of Gorkis funeral The fate of culture is bound up in our minds with the destiny of the Soviet Union. We will defend it. 1 have always maintained that the wish to re main true to oneself too often carries with it a risk of insincerity and I consider that if ever sincerity is important, it is surely when the beliefs of great masses of people are involved together with ones own...


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RETURN FROM THE U. S. S. R. Also by Andre Gide THE COUNTERFEITERS THE IMMORALIST TRAVELS IN THE CONGO These are Borzoi Books published by ALFRED A. KNOPF I DEDICATE THESE PAGES TO THE MEMORY OF EUGENE DABIT, BESIDE WHOM, WITH WHOM, THEY WERE LIVED AND THOUGHT THE HOMERIC HYMN TO DEMETER relates how the great goddess, in the course of her wanderings in search of her daughte RETURN FROM THE U. S. S. R. Also by Andre Gide THE COUNTERFEITERS THE IMMORALIST TRAVELS IN THE CONGO These are Borzoi Books published by ALFRED A. KNOPF I DEDICATE THESE PAGES TO THE MEMORY OF EUGENE DABIT, BESIDE WHOM, WITH WHOM, THEY WERE LIVED AND THOUGHT THE HOMERIC HYMN TO DEMETER relates how the great goddess, in the course of her wanderings in search of her daughter, came to the court of Keleos. No one recognized the goddess under the borrowed form of a humble wet-nurse and Queen Metaneira entrusted to her care her latest-born child, the infant Demophoon, afterwards known as Triptolemus, the founder of agriculture. Every evening, behind closed doors, while the household was asleep, Demeter took little Demo phoon out of his comfortable cradle and with appar ent cruelty., though moved in reality by a great love 1 and desirous of bringing him eventually to the state of godhoodj laid the naked child on a glowing bed of embers. I imagine the mighty Demeter bending ma ternally over the radiant nursling as over the future race of mankind. He endures the fiery charcoal he gathers strength from the ordeal. Something super human is fostered in Mm, something robust, some thing beyond all hope glorious. Ah, had Demeter only been able to carry through her bold attempt, to bring her daring venture to a successful issue But Metaneira becoming anxious, says the legend, burst suddenly into the room where the experiment was be ing carried on and guided by her mistaken fears, thrust aside the goddess at her work of forging the superman j pushed away the embers , and, in order to save the child, lost the god. CONTENTS FOREWORD XI RETURN FROM THE U. S. S. R. 3 APPENDICES r. Speech Delivered on the Occasion of Maxim Gorkis Funeral 65 n. Speech to the Students of Moscow 70 in. Speech to the Men of Letters of Leningrad 74 iv. The Struggle against Religion 78 v. Ostrovski 83 vi. A Kolkhoz 86 vu. Bolshevo 89 vni. The Besprizornis 91 FOREWORD THREE YEARS AGO I declared my admiration, my love, for the U. S. S. R. An unprecedented experi ment was being attempted there which filled our hearts with hope and from which we expected an immense advance, an impetus capable of carrying forward in its stride the whole human race. It is indeed worth while living, I thought, in order to be present at this rebirth, and worth while giving ones life in order to help it on. In our hearts and in our minds we resolutely linked the future of culture itself with the glorious destiny of the U. S. S. R. We have frequently said so. We should have liked to repeat it once again, Already, without as yet having seen things for ourselves, we could not but feel disturbed by cer tain recent decisions which seemed to denote a change of orientation. At that moment October 1935 I wrote as fol lows It is largely moreover the stupidity and unfair xi Xll FOREWORD ness of the attacks on the U. S. S. R. that make us defend it with some obstinacy. Those same yelpers will begin to approve the Soviet Union just as we shall cease to do so for what they will approve are those very compromises and concessions which will make some others say There You see but which will lead away from the goal it had at first set itself. Let us hope that in order to keep our eyes fixed on that goal we may not be obliged to avert them from the Soviet Union Nouvelle Revue Frangaise, March 1936 Resolving, however, to maintain at all costs my confidence until I had more to go upon, and pre ferring to doubt my own judgment, I declared once more, four days after my arrival in Moscow, in my speech in the Red Square on the occasion of Gorkis funeral The fate of culture is bound up in our minds with the destiny of the Soviet Union. We will defend it. 1 have always maintained that the wish to re main true to oneself too often carries with it a risk of insincerity and I consider that if ever sincerity is important, it is surely when the beliefs of great masses of people are involved together with ones own...

30 review for Back from the U.S.S.R

  1. 5 out of 5

    Eugene

    Very good period piece showing life in USSR by one of the original freedom seekers Andre Gide, book concisely points out USSR problems without being overbearing and spiteful literature of some Russian dissidents of later years. Gide took a lot of heat from some of the famous European intellectuals who saw Stalin's USSR as the only alternative to Hitler's Germany. Reading this book I kept thinking that freedom of press in USSR in late 70's early 80's was not much different than what was described Very good period piece showing life in USSR by one of the original freedom seekers Andre Gide, book concisely points out USSR problems without being overbearing and spiteful literature of some Russian dissidents of later years. Gide took a lot of heat from some of the famous European intellectuals who saw Stalin's USSR as the only alternative to Hitler's Germany. Reading this book I kept thinking that freedom of press in USSR in late 70's early 80's was not much different than what was described in Gide's book written in 1936.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zöe Zöe

    This book was published in 1937, I am pretty sure this is the edition Susan Sontag read as well. I feel honored. The tone is enthusiastic. It is dangerous to write with such a passionate heart for an ideology one appeals to. Beckett would never be this enthusiastic in his writing. Gide sees all kinds of achievements. "The achievements of the U.S.S.R. are usually admirable." 16. Yes, because any results that will associate with failures are not allowed in that circumstances. "No, no! There was no This book was published in 1937, I am pretty sure this is the edition Susan Sontag read as well. I feel honored. The tone is enthusiastic. It is dangerous to write with such a passionate heart for an ideology one appeals to. Beckett would never be this enthusiastic in his writing. Gide sees all kinds of achievements. "The achievements of the U.S.S.R. are usually admirable." 16. Yes, because any results that will associate with failures are not allowed in that circumstances. "No, no! There was nothing artificial there, nothing that had been prepared beforehand. " 18 then this is too naiive. In any places, for a big name as Gide, there must be something prepared beforehand, needless to say it is USSR. How could he possibly believe everything is improvising?! On children's faces, he sees "radiant with health and happiness, seemed as though they wanted to make me an offering of their joy."19 The radiation of joy, what a fearful feeling. Can this be called happy? We don't know. If you say that everything is a show in both Capitalism and Socialism/Communism, then which one is the real joy, and what is the real feeling? As a human being, the only thing real is "we are all going to die one day". And there is a insightful opinion about humor. "mockery, irony, criticism are all of a piece. The child who is incapable of making fun will turn into the credulous and submissive youth whom later on you, my dear mocker, will critize for his conformity." 23. But in such a place, mockery etc. are cosidered disloyalty. Everything is serious, and embedded with meaning. Who is supposed to laugh at meanings ?! "But what we didn't like so much -- what we didn't like at all -- was that we were unable to communicate with the rest of the train." 27, so in what extent, Gide thinks this is all unprepared. Readers now have to think how a belief can blind a great mind. Gide comes from the "melancholy Europe", he sees USSR, he feels fresh. They traveled, and on the way they saw forrest. As a good symbolic icon, Gide also writes on forrest. "The important thing for me here is man -- men -- what can be done with them, and what has been done. The forest that attracts me, the frightful tangle in which I am lost, in the forest of social questions. In the USSR they solicit you, press on you, oppress you on every side."31 The forest is like a mysterious place where we might find the death drive. It is also the place where we may rethink a lot of things. Gide is talking about changing, transition. From all aspects of lives in USSR, everything is changing, esp. they are getting rid of old things. Socialism educated you with a new system of aesthetics. It neglates human being, instead, emphasizing on sacrificing, and repression. For Gide who hears all about the value of individual and human beings, this might be interesting and new. It feels conservative for him, and it turns into a beauty. A twisted one. Gide thinks he saw what humanity really is in USSR. Isn't it a joke? What is humanity on earth after all these years? Humanity is just a academic department. !!! Seeing people waiting in line, Gide used the word "Regisned" 36, they resigned to think that is a waste of their time, meanwhile, they have no other choice. However, Gide also resigned in front of such a powerful, overwhelming ideology. Luckily, he still has some opinions on his own. "And nothing is a greater danger to culture than such a frame of mind." 48, "What really interests them is to know whether we admire them enough. "49 This is not a frame of mind though, this is one of their characters that doesn't change for ages. However, maybe this is one of the traits those big territory countries have. As a nation, they are used to be admired, and as long as you give them this satisfaction, you will be fine. Another important word is "Foreigners"53. They categorize the world simply as Us and Foreigners. There is no need to distinguish whether you are French or Italian, you are all foreigners to us, the end. It is a jaw-dropping fact that how we other others in order to define ourselves. "Offering private help"61 is also mentioned by Gide. I agree with him. It shows that as the days go by, his enthusiasm faded away, and then he is again be able to revive his great mind. Private help. "What will the artist do if there is no reason for him to go against the current, if all he need do is to let himself be carried by it? " 74 What a great insight. There are people struggling about whether go against the main stream, or just let the trend raise him up. Not only artists, everybody. In every aspects of life. Because the later is just simple and easier. What the hell cares about following one's heart?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Satenik Petrossian

    հայերեն տարբերակը կարող եք կարդալ այստեղ՝ http://grapaharan.org/index.php/Վերադ... հայերեն տարբերակը կարող եք կարդալ այստեղ՝ http://grapaharan.org/index.php/Վերադ...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mehdi

    کتاب خوبیه ،فضای اندیشه و تفکرات نخبگانی در فرانسه و ... رو در 20 سال بعد از انقلاب روسیه رو خوب به تصویر کشیده ترجمه های جلال روان و خوش خوان هستن برخلاف نوشته های خودش که ی کوچولو سخت خوانن

  5. 4 out of 5

    Thorwald-eirik

    André Gide disait « c’est témoigner mal son amour que se borner à la louange » dans Retour de l’URSS, livre publié en novembre 1936. André Gide, né le 22 novembre 1869, était un écrivain français né d’une famille bourgeoise protestante. Il se sent différent des autres depuis son enfance et assume son homosexualité dès 1893 lors d’un voyage en Afrique du Nord. Il soutient le combat des Dreyfusards non par militantisme mais en se liant d’amitié avec Roger Martin du Gard, Paul Valéry ou Francis Jam André Gide disait « c’est témoigner mal son amour que se borner à la louange » dans Retour de l’URSS, livre publié en novembre 1936. André Gide, né le 22 novembre 1869, était un écrivain français né d’une famille bourgeoise protestante. Il se sent différent des autres depuis son enfance et assume son homosexualité dès 1893 lors d’un voyage en Afrique du Nord. Il soutient le combat des Dreyfusards non par militantisme mais en se liant d’amitié avec Roger Martin du Gard, Paul Valéry ou Francis Jammes. Après son voyage au Congo, le voyageur esthète qu’était Gide publie son journal de voyage en 1927 dans lequel il dénonce les pratiques coloniales ainsi que les attitudes des Européens. Il s’intéresse au communisme à partir des années 30, il est en effet très enthousiaste pour l’expérience soviétique. L’URSS, dirigée depuis 14 par Joseph Staline, devient plus enfermée par rapport aux autres pays. Parti unique, déportation des opposants dans les Goulags, censure étatique, une véritable dictature est mise en place, sans qu’elle ne soit connue dans les autres pays. Son ami Jef Last, chef du parti communiste hollandais (le CPN), invite Gide à venir en URSS pour se rendre compte des merveilles du communisme, de ce rêve devenu réalité. Gide entreprend alors un voyage du 16 juin au 24 aout 1936 vers ce pays qu’il pensait être le paradis sur terre, l’URSS. Il écrit un carnet de voyage au cours de son périple dans lequel il décrit ses observations et surtout ses déceptions : après l’avoir jeté par crainte d’hypothétiques représailles, il décide néanmoins de publier en novembre 36 Retour de l’URSS grâce à ses souvenirs. En tant que marxiste convaincu, il se permet de critiquer le système aussi bien de façon positive que négative, ce sont ces critiques qui lui valent beaucoup d’injures et d’attaques de la part des militants communistes. Le texte proposé est un extrait du troisième chapitre de son livre dans lequel Gide entreprend une diatribe du système communiste, exprimant de cette façon sa déception. André Gide montre, en observant les différences entre le marxisme théorique et le stalinisme réel instauré en Union Sovietique, comment une vision utopique de l’URSS passe à une vision dystopique.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Iana

    André Gide's famous text written on his return from the USSR in 1936. It is a tale of disillusionment written by a French communist intellectual realising that the Soviet regime is not delivering as much as hoped for. Above all Gide notes the population's brainwashing and the cult of the Leader. He apparently missed out on the horrendous Stalinist repression going on at that time. The text can be appreciated as it is an act of intellectual honesty by someone otherwise committed to the communist André Gide's famous text written on his return from the USSR in 1936. It is a tale of disillusionment written by a French communist intellectual realising that the Soviet regime is not delivering as much as hoped for. Above all Gide notes the population's brainwashing and the cult of the Leader. He apparently missed out on the horrendous Stalinist repression going on at that time. The text can be appreciated as it is an act of intellectual honesty by someone otherwise committed to the communist "Faith". Many French intellectuals on the Left did not go down that road. Alas the book contains no thorough analysis, nor does it teach one a lot. There have definitely been much more lucid French authors on the reality of the Soviet regime in the interwar period: journalists like Joseph Kessel and Albert Londres, for instance.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

    حزبی یا طرفی وجود ندارد که بستگی به آن لازم باشد.می خواهم بگویم بستگی من به آن لازم باشدو یا بتواند مرا وابدارد آن حزب را بر حقیقت ترجیح بدهم. به محض اینکه دروغ و فریب پا به درون گذاشت اضطراب من آغاز می شود. رسالتی که من برای خود قائلم راندن دروغ و فریب است . من به حقیقت بستگی دارم نه به حزب و اگر حزب حقیقت را ترک گفت من نیز فورا حزب را ترک خواهم گفت بخشهایی از کتاب بازگشت از شوروی به ترجمه جلال آل احمد

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mateu

    It shows the strong position Andre had to defend in order to criticise USSR being himself a communist.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jafar

    The book was used by the Islamists against the leftists after the revolution in Iran. Gide is so well-know in Iran and so little-known in the US.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad Reza

    کتاب در مورد سفر نویسنده مشهور فرانسوی اندره ژید به شوروی تقریبا ۲۰ سال پس از انقلاب ۱۹۱۷ روسیه است،دلیل نوشته شدن این کتاب تمایل قلبی نویسنده به کمونیست و انقلاب ۱۹۱۷ روسیه بود که از لحاظ سیاسی برای تمام کمونیست های جهان یک اتفاق بسیار مهم و درخشان در تاریخ دنیا به شمار میرفت.جایی که انتظار میرفت تمام ویژگی هایی که کمونیست مدعی اون بود از تساوی حقوق و دستمزد ها تا حکومت شورایی و نقد پذیری های کلان و... در استانه نتیجه دادن یا حداقل نشانه ای برای امیدواری برای تحقق یافتن اونها در اینده مشاهده بش کتاب در مورد سفر نویسنده مشهور فرانسوی اندره ژید به شوروی تقریبا ۲۰ سال پس از انقلاب ۱۹۱۷ روسیه است،دلیل نوشته شدن این کتاب تمایل قلبی نویسنده به کمونیست و انقلاب ۱۹۱۷ روسیه بود که از لحاظ سیاسی برای تمام کمونیست های جهان یک اتفاق بسیار مهم و درخشان در تاریخ دنیا به شمار میرفت.جایی که انتظار میرفت تمام ویژگی هایی که کمونیست مدعی اون بود از تساوی حقوق و دستمزد ها تا حکومت شورایی و نقد پذیری های کلان و... در استانه نتیجه دادن یا حداقل نشانه ای برای امیدواری برای تحقق یافتن اونها در اینده مشاهده بشه.اما با همه این امیدواری ها سفر نویسنده به شوروی ژید رو با حقیقتی به اسم کمونیست استالینی/شوروی/مسکویی اشنا میکنه که تقریبا با اکثر ارمان های انقلاب و کمونیست واقعی در تضاد یا حداقل میل خواستن به رسیدن به ارمانهای کمونیست رو به افول نشون داده میشه.همین امر باعث میشه نویسنده پس از بازگشت به فرانسه کتاب بازگشت از شوروی و تنقیح بازگشت از شوروی رو بنویسه.که این نسخه از ترجمه کتاب شامل هردو عنوان میشه به اضافه ضمایم و نامه های مرتبط. +نکته ها : مقدمه ناشر بهتره با این دید خونده بشه که قصد داره سیاه نمایی اغراق امیزی رو به مخاطب منتقل کنه که شاید باعث بشه نکات مثبتی که در ادامه بیان خواهد شد هم تاثیر خودشون از دست بدن. +کتاب شامل دیده ها و صحبت های نویسنده با افراد مختلف،سخنرانی ها و کمی هم قضاوت های شخصی نویسنده هست که با ترجمه خوبی به فارسی برگردانده شده. و نکته اخر: از متن کتاب برداشت میشه که ژید با کمونیست استالینی مخالف بود نه با خود کمونیست و حتی به گفته خودش این کتاب رو برای اگاه کردن کمونیست های فرانسه و دیگر کشور ها نوشت و اینکه چگونه یک انقلاب میتونه از ارمان های خودش دست بکشه...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Maurizio Manco

    "Sta in questo il carattere proprio del dispotismo: circondarsi non di uomini di valore, ma di esseri servili." (p. 116)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Benoit Morin

    - Great view life in the USSR - Great analysis on the pros / cons of the regime - Very insightful if you want to understand what life (the bad AND the good) was life in this regime

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sametegàl

    Mi aspettavo qualcosa di più dettagliato nella descrizione del viaggio - ma la parte più appassionante è quella in cui risponde ai critici. Appassionante ed attuale: il trinariciutismo non muore mai.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Yves Panis

    Lucidité d'André Gide. Tout est dit et ce dès 1936. Avant les grands procès de Moscou.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anders Fröjmark

    André Gide a visité l’Union soviétique en 1936, avec des grandes expectations. Il pensait d’y pouvoir voir un nouveau monde se former. Pourtant, il a vu beaucoup de choses plutôt inquiétantes, y compris le conformisme et ce qu’il terme « la dépersonnalisation ». Il ne se sent pas non plus à l’aise avec la manque de liberté et la distance accroissant entre Staline et le peuple. Néanmoins, il veut garder sa solidarité avec les aspirations soviétiques, et il témoigne aussi d’expériences plus positi André Gide a visité l’Union soviétique en 1936, avec des grandes expectations. Il pensait d’y pouvoir voir un nouveau monde se former. Pourtant, il a vu beaucoup de choses plutôt inquiétantes, y compris le conformisme et ce qu’il terme « la dépersonnalisation ». Il ne se sent pas non plus à l’aise avec la manque de liberté et la distance accroissant entre Staline et le peuple. Néanmoins, il veut garder sa solidarité avec les aspirations soviétiques, et il témoigne aussi d’expériences plus positives et touchantes pendant son voyage. Dire la vérité sur ce qu’il a vu est selon lui une expression de solidarité. Le livre a connu un succès formidable et le nombre d’éditions est impressionnant (j’ai la 128ème édition, qui est paru en décembre 1936).

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dmitri

    Я прочитал эту книгу в русском переводе (издание Алгоритм, Москва, 2015 -- ISBN 978-5-906789-28-0). На пятидесяти страницах автор (чьи произведения я раньше не читал) показывает блёклую, прямо скажем, реальность СССР в 1936-м году. Андре Жид всё понял: не зря его в Союзе запретили. Книга отличная: с юмором, болью, и многими интересными набросками.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cyrille Honoré

    C'est parce que Gide aime l'URSS qu'il la critique aussi fortement en 1936. Je crois que c'est ce qui nous manque dans l'UE : des gens qui sachent l'aimer mais qui sachent tout autant la critiquer. La force de ce témoignage de Gide, c'est de retrouver entre l'UE d'aujoud'hui et l'URSS d'avant-guerre des ressemblances : bureaucratie, autosatisfaction et monomanie économique notamment.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Interesting, but obviously dated, as travelogue or history. But revelatory and fresh as the story of one person's gradual and painful disillusionment worldview and mindset (Gide was committed to communism, a fervent believer. That is, until 1935 when he visited the USSR).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    آندره ژید که یکی از شیفتگان کمونیسم استالینی، پس از سفر به شوروی و مشاهده ی اوضاع از نزدیک، این سفرنامه را منتشر کرد که در زمان خود در محافل کمونیستی اروپای غربی جنجال بپا کرد. آل احمد نیز پس از جدایی از حزب توده، به ترجمه ی این اثر آندره ژید پرداخت.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alcmène

    Un témoignage historique et philosophique intéressant.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mehdi

    A candid, disenchanted look at the USSR under Staline

  22. 5 out of 5

    Siamak Mehrabani

  23. 4 out of 5

    marie.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dora

  25. 4 out of 5

    Arya Ptb

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nicolas Fremaux

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erdem

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amir Rafighi

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hossein Yarahmadi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Federico

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