counter create hit Madam Walker Theatre Center: An Indianapolis Treasure - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Madam Walker Theatre Center: An Indianapolis Treasure

Availability: Ready to download

As they watched construction of the block-long flatiron building brick by brick throughout 1927, African American residents of Indianapolis could scarcely contain their pride. This new headquarters of the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, with its terra-cotta trimmed facade, was to be more than corporate offices and a factory for what then was one of America's most As they watched construction of the block-long flatiron building brick by brick throughout 1927, African American residents of Indianapolis could scarcely contain their pride. This new headquarters of the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, with its terra-cotta trimmed facade, was to be more than corporate offices and a factory for what then was one of America's most successful black businesses. In fact, it was designed as "a city within a city," with an African Art Deco theater, ballroom, restaurant, drugstore, beauty salon, beauty school, and medical offices. Generations of African American families met for Sunday dinner at the Coffee Pot, enjoyed first-run movies and live performances in the Walker Theatre, and hosted dances in the Casino. Today, this National Historic Landmark is an arts center anchoring the Indiana Avenue Cultural District.


Compare

As they watched construction of the block-long flatiron building brick by brick throughout 1927, African American residents of Indianapolis could scarcely contain their pride. This new headquarters of the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, with its terra-cotta trimmed facade, was to be more than corporate offices and a factory for what then was one of America's most As they watched construction of the block-long flatiron building brick by brick throughout 1927, African American residents of Indianapolis could scarcely contain their pride. This new headquarters of the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, with its terra-cotta trimmed facade, was to be more than corporate offices and a factory for what then was one of America's most successful black businesses. In fact, it was designed as "a city within a city," with an African Art Deco theater, ballroom, restaurant, drugstore, beauty salon, beauty school, and medical offices. Generations of African American families met for Sunday dinner at the Coffee Pot, enjoyed first-run movies and live performances in the Walker Theatre, and hosted dances in the Casino. Today, this National Historic Landmark is an arts center anchoring the Indiana Avenue Cultural District.

39 review for Madam Walker Theatre Center: An Indianapolis Treasure

  1. 5 out of 5

    robin friedman

    Madam Walker And Her Theatre "Madam Walker Theatre Centre: An Indianapolis Treasure" (2013) by A'Leila Bundles is a short photographic history of Madam C.J. Walker and of the Indianapolis theatre she envisioned and which bears her name. A'Leila Bundles is the great-great-granddaughter of Madam Walker and has had a remarkable career in her own right. Bundles is an Emmy award-winning producer and former ABC News Executive and trustee of Columbia University. She is the author of a highly regarded bi Madam Walker And Her Theatre "Madam Walker Theatre Centre: An Indianapolis Treasure" (2013) by A'Leila Bundles is a short photographic history of Madam C.J. Walker and of the Indianapolis theatre she envisioned and which bears her name. A'Leila Bundles is the great-great-granddaughter of Madam Walker and has had a remarkable career in her own right. Bundles is an Emmy award-winning producer and former ABC News Executive and trustee of Columbia University. She is the author of a highly regarded biography of Madam Walker, "On Her own Ground". The first self-made woman American millionaire, Walker (1867 -- 1919) led an inspiring life. Born Sarah Breedlove in Louisiana to newly-freed slaves, Walker was orphaned at the age of seven and a widow with a child by 20. She supported herself as a washerwoman for two decades. When Walker became concerned over her hair loss in her late 30s, she discovered and began selling a product for hair restoration which became known as "Madam Walker's Wonderful Hair Grower". Walker began manufacturing a line of hair and other cosmetic products to African American women. She franchised her products and established a nation-wide system of schools for African American beauticians and cosmetologists. With her business acumen and real estate savvy, Madame Walker became wealthy. She moved her business from Denver to Pittsburgh to Indianapolis and ultimately to Harlem and to the Hudson River where she built a large mansion just before her 1919 death. In 1914, angered at her treatment by a segregated Indianapolis theatre, Madam Walker purchased a large city block in the city's African American district to house her company's headquarters and factory. The complex, a large four story building which included a drugstore, beauty salon, a beauty school, professional offices, ballroom, and 1500 seat theater, opened just after Christmas in December, 1927 and served for many years as a community landmark and as the headquarters for the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company. In the 1970's the building had fallen into disrepair and was about to be demolished. The Walker cosmetics business was sold in 1985. With community effort, the building was painstakingly restored and reopened in 1988 as the Madam Walker Theatre Center. In 1991, the Walker Building was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Madam Walker, her business endeavors, and her theater are wonderful to get to know and Bundles tells their stories well with beautiful photographs. The book covers Walker's early life, her business associates, the products she manufactured, the cosmetology school, the theater, and much more. The book includes photographs of urban Indianapolis through the mid-20th Century and beyond, of advertisements over the years for Madame Walker's products, of her schools, and of the businesses in the Walker Building that are good to have in a short book and that capture a great deal about Madam Walker. This little book might well have been expanded into several volumes. It covers the opening of the Walker Building and its restoration during the 1980s but has relatively little about the theater and its activities during the intervening years. Instead, most of the book is devoted to Madam Walker, her far-flung businesses, and her successors in the Walker family. While fascinating and important, the focus of the book is not on the Madam Walker Theatre Center. The book offers an excellent quick introduction to African American entrepreneurship, to the continued lure of pulling oneself up by one's bootstraps, and to Madam Walker. I enjoyed learning more about her in this book, which is part of the "Images of America" series of local American photographic histories published by Arcadia Publishers. Robin Friedman

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kim. E.

    I've been incredibly lucky and fortunate to travel all over the country and world and learn about their cultures and history. Given that, why is it I drive or walk past the same historical landmarks in my own daily world? I lived in or near Indianapolis, Indiana for over ten years. At the time the city was actually called Indiana-no-place by Hoosiers in the area. I can't tell you what the precipitating moment or event was that began this change, but by the time I moved sadly from Indianapolis the I've been incredibly lucky and fortunate to travel all over the country and world and learn about their cultures and history. Given that, why is it I drive or walk past the same historical landmarks in my own daily world? I lived in or near Indianapolis, Indiana for over ten years. At the time the city was actually called Indiana-no-place by Hoosiers in the area. I can't tell you what the precipitating moment or event was that began this change, but by the time I moved sadly from Indianapolis the city was entirely different. We built a NFL football stadium when a team wasn't even possible, lobbied to locate the NCAA museum here, developed a zoo that was quite above the curve at the time, enhanced the White River by spending millions turning the river in the center of downtown into a smaller version of the river walk in Texas. As these projects became reality, new hotels arrived as did a mall connected to several of them by a walkway in the sky. Located between the White River and the IUPUI campus which included a new Olympic level swimming facility stood a building I knew only as being connected to someone named Madam Walker. I drove by that building a million times, and I watched all the work that went into remodeling and saving this unusual building that was gaining national fame and was placed on the National Historical Landmarks list. This book opened my eyes to an incredible woman who went from being born in a slave cabin during the Civil War to being the first woman, not the first African American woman to earn a million dollars. Born Sarah Breedlove, Madam Walker was working in a laundry in St. Louis for penance when she developed a hair product she needed because she was losing her hair. As she developed a customer base, Madam Walker decided to move to Indianapolis, Indiana due to the vast transportation options she had. At the time Indianapolis was controlled politically by the Klu Klux Klan and Miss Walker encountered a raise in movie ticket prices for the unfavored. Madam Walker was ahead of her time in every facet of business. She sold her hair products to many, but she also decided that women needed to be trained to assist other black women with the same issues. She insisted on teaching women in not only the steps for successful hair dressing employment, but also insisted they be taught classes that encouraged them to build their businesses across the United States and many other countries. She built the Madam C. J. Walker Manufacturing Company in 1927. This building did not only offer space to conduct her sales and classes, but it was considered a "city within a city" with a large Art Deco movie theatre, a ballroom, restaurant, drug store, beauty store, and medical offices. Madam Walker was quality in all aspects of her life, which she passed on to the women to come. An incredible woman worthy of so much.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Conn

  4. 4 out of 5

    Charity Bartley Howard

  5. 4 out of 5

    BOOKTHEWRITER

  6. 4 out of 5

    Beverly Pope Smith

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sherri Eggleston

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steph

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

  10. 4 out of 5

    Meghan Miller

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cecelia

  12. 5 out of 5

    Richard Denman

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stef

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarai Lillie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sydney Gwaltney

  18. 5 out of 5

    Debra E.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angi

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tasasha

  21. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  22. 5 out of 5

    QueenAmidala28

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angel Pickard

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nia

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mia Zaza

  26. 4 out of 5

    libraryfacts

  27. 4 out of 5

    Janice

  28. 5 out of 5

    Quintina J.

  29. 5 out of 5

    James Vanegas

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Alicia

  31. 5 out of 5

    Michael Scott

  32. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  33. 5 out of 5

    Saundra

  34. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  35. 5 out of 5

    Tushiya Hunter

  36. 5 out of 5

    Ines Yupanqui

  37. 4 out of 5

    Donna Woods

  38. 5 out of 5

    Bernitta

  39. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.