counter create hit The Message: The Reselling of President Obama - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Message: The Reselling of President Obama

Availability: Ready to download

They had 99 problems but Mitt Romney wasn't one. At the start of an epic election, the team trying to reelect President Obama faced a mountain of challenges: a dismal economy, the faded hopes of the first campaign, and a struggle to raise enough cash to compete. No president had risen so fast, or fallen so far, in the modern era. And no president in living memory had earne They had 99 problems but Mitt Romney wasn't one. At the start of an epic election, the team trying to reelect President Obama faced a mountain of challenges: a dismal economy, the faded hopes of the first campaign, and a struggle to raise enough cash to compete. No president had risen so fast, or fallen so far, in the modern era. And no president in living memory had earned a second term in such troubled times. To resell the president, they needed to redefine the world they were living in. They needed to retell their own story and rewrite the characters. They needed to find The Message. But first, they needed to fight the enemy within: each other. For six years they kept a lid on their internal disputes-the ego clashes, the disappointed ambitions, and the battle to control the Obama brand. Everything was out of public view and under wraps. They called their style No Drama Obama, and the phrase matched the mood of the candidate. But it was never completely true. In 2008 they found a way around their rivalries. Four years later, their hostilities threatened to undermine the reelection of a president at a time when most voters were deeply unhappy and ready for change. Drawing on unrivaled access to the key characters, The Message tells the inside story of the Mad Men-the marketers, message-shapers, and admakers-who held the Obama presidency in their hands.


Compare

They had 99 problems but Mitt Romney wasn't one. At the start of an epic election, the team trying to reelect President Obama faced a mountain of challenges: a dismal economy, the faded hopes of the first campaign, and a struggle to raise enough cash to compete. No president had risen so fast, or fallen so far, in the modern era. And no president in living memory had earne They had 99 problems but Mitt Romney wasn't one. At the start of an epic election, the team trying to reelect President Obama faced a mountain of challenges: a dismal economy, the faded hopes of the first campaign, and a struggle to raise enough cash to compete. No president had risen so fast, or fallen so far, in the modern era. And no president in living memory had earned a second term in such troubled times. To resell the president, they needed to redefine the world they were living in. They needed to retell their own story and rewrite the characters. They needed to find The Message. But first, they needed to fight the enemy within: each other. For six years they kept a lid on their internal disputes-the ego clashes, the disappointed ambitions, and the battle to control the Obama brand. Everything was out of public view and under wraps. They called their style No Drama Obama, and the phrase matched the mood of the candidate. But it was never completely true. In 2008 they found a way around their rivalries. Four years later, their hostilities threatened to undermine the reelection of a president at a time when most voters were deeply unhappy and ready for change. Drawing on unrivaled access to the key characters, The Message tells the inside story of the Mad Men-the marketers, message-shapers, and admakers-who held the Obama presidency in their hands.

30 review for The Message: The Reselling of President Obama

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm

    The 2012 US Presidential Election from a Communications POV There are always lots of books and memoirs about elections, and this book takes the reader through the lens of communications and messaging for the Obama re-election campaign. It's my understanding the author wrote another similar book about the 2008 election, but I haven't read that one yet.   Here, the author talks to the Obama team: David Axlerod, Jim Messina, etc. about the trials and travails of the campaign's messaging and what they The 2012 US Presidential Election from a Communications POV There are always lots of books and memoirs about elections, and this book takes the reader through the lens of communications and messaging for the Obama re-election campaign. It's my understanding the author wrote another similar book about the 2008 election, but I haven't read that one yet.   Here, the author talks to the Obama team: David Axlerod, Jim Messina, etc. about the trials and travails of the campaign's messaging and what they wanted to tell the electorate in terms of the economy, their Republican opponent(s), why the President should be re-elected, etc. They were aided, of course, by the technological powerhouse that examined voters to get every single possible voter to come on Election Day. Wolffe talks a bit about how the data was sliced and diced to figure out who were the undecideds and who was up for grabs as a possible vote.   He also talks about the messaging from the campaign. The economy, economy, economy. How to talk about it when it was still really bad and hard for people to find work? How to define the eventual Republican candidate, Mitt Romney? What could they say? What should they say? Wolffe also talks a bit about the Republican side of things, about their messages and their communications response, but clearly he's writing this from the Obama campaign POV. But Wolffe does a good job in talking about the major events of the campaign (Romney's overseas trip, the Republican National Convention, the debates, etc.) and how communications and messaging was handled by both sides.   There's also quite a bit of drama within the Obama campaign. The "no drama Obama" ideal definitely never happened here (at all?) as it's clear different strategists have difference alliances, different goals and different ways of working. People dislike each other, disagree, work around each other, etc. When you read this it puts some future events into better context (main one that came to mind was David Axlerod and Jim Messina working on for the opposing main British political parties). I felt a little uncomfortable for the negative views on Stephanie Cutter, the deputy campaign manager. Wolffe says more than once that no one wanted to work with her and had ambitions for working in the White House. That she had a strong bond with First Lady Michelle Obama is hinted as a reason why others had to put up with her. Nothing wrong with ambitions campaign workers, but the men didn't seem to get the same treatment and so it makes me wonder a bit.   In some ways the book doesn't really tell anything that's new. It confirmed a statement by a Republican consultant that I listened to the day after the election in 2012. He said he by...8 PM (maybe later, can't remember) that the election would be called for Obama and went to sleep at a nice, regular time. The Obama campaign fought to define its opponent earlier in the summer, when the nomination wasn't official but Romney was clearly going to be the candidate. Because Romney and the GOP failed to respond in a timely manner (or at all, as Wolffe points out Romney avoided discussing his religion, which might have helped with the voters), the Obama campaign had the advantage of being able to bludgeon Romney over Bain.   It's not a bad book, and works as a complement to others out there (Game Change: Double Down, for example). But unless one is really interested in the communications and messaging aspects of the campaign, it wasn't exactly a page-turning like GC was. I enjoyed it but was glad I picked it up from the library.  

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    This book provided little new insight into the 2012 election season. It more or less just recapped the Obama campaign's strategy, and while it purports to tell the inside story of the campaign team, the "drama" detailed was fairly tame and par for the course in a political campaign. You read books like this for greater insight or juicy tidbits (or a little of both). Sadly, Wolffe delivers neither. This book provided little new insight into the 2012 election season. It more or less just recapped the Obama campaign's strategy, and while it purports to tell the inside story of the campaign team, the "drama" detailed was fairly tame and par for the course in a political campaign. You read books like this for greater insight or juicy tidbits (or a little of both). Sadly, Wolffe delivers neither.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    This is a pretty critical look at how a White House so seemingly focused on reforming the way Washington works ultimately embraced the tactics it had vowed to reject. Obama fans will hate it; detractors will likely say "I told you so." Wolffe isn't the best writer on the planet, and his flat prose sometimes lets down the subject matter. Still, it is instructive in demonstrating how easily idealism becomes a casualty of political gain, ambition, and necessity. This is a pretty critical look at how a White House so seemingly focused on reforming the way Washington works ultimately embraced the tactics it had vowed to reject. Obama fans will hate it; detractors will likely say "I told you so." Wolffe isn't the best writer on the planet, and his flat prose sometimes lets down the subject matter. Still, it is instructive in demonstrating how easily idealism becomes a casualty of political gain, ambition, and necessity.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    MANBC.com executive editor Richard Wolffe writes about the communication strategy of the 2012 Obama presidential campaign. There wasn't much here I did not already know, although some of the discussion about the reactions to various Romney campaign moves was interesting. Wolffe wirtes well, but there was not much drama or "insider dish"to his story. MANBC.com executive editor Richard Wolffe writes about the communication strategy of the 2012 Obama presidential campaign. There wasn't much here I did not already know, although some of the discussion about the reactions to various Romney campaign moves was interesting. Wolffe wirtes well, but there was not much drama or "insider dish"to his story.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    More of a good review of the campaign.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Critchley

  7. 5 out of 5

    Y

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  9. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paulette Smith

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Navarro

  13. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ashli Collins

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eric Peckham

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris Ziesler

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mario Tosto

  18. 4 out of 5

    David

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jed Mortenson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  21. 5 out of 5

    DeMon Spencer

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gloria Dixon

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris Carson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  27. 4 out of 5

    C

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Coffland

  29. 5 out of 5

    martin j brennan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Faith Schanck

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.